MaxKatt

Deep Water Farmed (Non-Hybrid) Stripers

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27 posts in this topic

14 hours ago, norcalkat said:

incorrect, we have Striped Bass here that are 100% Morone Saxatilis.  The reason they have broken lines happens when they are raised from Fry in hatcheries and something genetically happens to the stripes.   All of the Stripers we have in Northern California come from the Navesink River that came across the country via train in the 1890s.  In the Early 90's we had a Striper Club that was funding the cost of raising Striper smolts and they were showing up with broken lines.   Those smolts were released out here and since have spawned with the NJ strain of Stripers and we sometimes get stripers with solid lines or with broken lines.  I have talked to a marine biologist and he told me that the hatchery grown stripers have a high incidence of getting broken lines, that some hatcheries in the East Coast have shown same results. 

Missed this post. I was breeding eastern king snakes awhile back. Ended up with a couple of hatchlings that were striped instead of the normal chain pattern. Experienced breeders said it was usually caused by higher incubation temps. So I looked and found this old study.

 

Quote
Selected Biocharacteristics of Hatchery-Reared Striped Bass Captured in New York Ocean Waters 
JOHN R. WALDMAN 
Hudson River Foundation, 40 West 20th Street, Ninth Floor, New York, New York 10011, USA
VICTOR J. VECCHIO 
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Marine Resources, 205 Belle Meade Road, East Setauket, New York 11733, USA
Abstract
Millions of hatchery-reared striped bass Morone saxatilis have been stocked into the Hudson River since 1983 and into the Chesapeake Bay since 1985; these annual programs continue indefinitely. Despite the magnitude of these plantings, little attention has been paid to whether or not these hatchery-reared fish display the migratory behavior or morphological characteristics of their wild counterparts. Most of these fish were marked with coded wire tags. To examine selected biocharacteristics of hatchery-reared striped bass in the wild, we used coded wire tag detectors to identify hatchery-reared fish among striped bass captured during autumn in 1991 and 1992 in haul seines near Montauk, New York. More than 1,500 striped bass were scanned for coded wire tags each year; hatchery-reared fish composed about 3.5% of the striped bass catch in 1991 and 2.5% 1 year later. Although only about twice as many marked striped bass were stocked in Chesapeake Bay as in the Hudson River, the recapture ratio of Chesapeake Bay to Hudson River fish was 62: 1 in 1991 and 37:2 in 1992; these differences probably resulted from differences in relative survival or migratory behavior. Hatchery-reared striped bass from Chesapeake Bay showed significant (P < 0.05) differences from wild fish in 14 of 18 morphometric dimensions and in the proportion of fish with asymmetric pectoral fin ray counts, but not in the magnitude of asymmetrical fin ray counts or in condition. Hatchery-reared striped bass also displayed a pronounced increase in the incidence of broken stripedness, which may be related to the artificial environments in which they had been raised. We believe that the continued use of hatchery-reared striped bass requires additional monitoring to determine whether or not they are inferior to wild fish in such key characteristics as migratory behavior or homing fidelity.

 

 

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3 hours ago, 55555s said:

This is the future of store bought fish.

Looks like stripers will be number 5 in the list of fish being seriously aquacultured for human consumption.  Read "Four Fish: the Future of the Last Wild Food" by Paul Greenberg.  Very interesting read.  The author is a "local" guy, raised on Long Island Sound in Connecticut.  He saw first hand what has happened to all our sport fisheries here in the Northeast. 

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48 mins ago, Dan Tinman said:

Looks like stripers will be number 5 in the list of fish being seriously aquacultured for human consumption.  Read "Four Fish: the Future of the Last Wild Food" by Paul Greenberg.  Very interesting read.  The author is a "local" guy, raised on Long Island Sound in Connecticut.  He saw first hand what has happened to all our sport fisheries here in the Northeast. 

Good book!

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2 hours ago, Shaky said:

Missed this post. I was breeding eastern king snakes awhile back. Ended up with a couple of hatchlings that were striped instead of the normal chain pattern. Experienced breeders said it was usually caused by higher incubation temps. So I looked and found this old study.

 

 

 

Very interesting.  Thansk to you, and especially NorCalKatt for adding smarts and value here.

 

NY Times Food Section is typically my least favorite and most often skipped.  Surprised it fed a thread that made it to a second page.

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1 hour ago, MaxKatt said:

 

Very interesting.  Thansk to you, and especially NorCalKatt for adding smarts and value here.

 

NY Times Food Section is typically my least favorite and most often skipped.  Surprised it fed a thread that made it to a second page.

One other thing, with the snakes it wasn't a genetic mutation, so it wasn't something that was passed along, or so they said. I'm pretty sure they would have tried to breed and sell a striped variation so I'll take their word on it.

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21 hours ago, Shaky said:

Missed this post. I was breeding eastern king snakes awhile back. Ended up with a couple of hatchlings that were striped instead of the normal chain pattern. Experienced breeders said it was usually caused by higher incubation temps. So I looked and found this old study.

 

 

 

I had no idea this was ever attempted....I wonder how a program like this would benefit the fishery today

 

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1 hour ago, BrianBM said:

Why breed king snakes?  As pets?

Why not? Why do people keep and breed tropical fish?

 

yes as pets. 

 

Most reptiles  bought and sold today are captive bred and though most people don’t care much for them it probably goes a long way in preserving wild populations. 

 

Many of the breeders are as passionate about saving the resource  as fishermen are about saving theirs. 

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26 mins ago, BrianBM said:

No criticism meant, I was just curious. Kingsnakes eat other snakes, don't they?  Must be a pain to feed them.

Feed them mice. Would by them frozen and vacuum packed. Thaw them out at feeding time. 

 

In in the wild snakes may carry parasites I was told not a good idea to feed them snakes or lizards in captivity

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Enjoy.  Still, while I've enjoyed many a chat with a friend's parrot (he's a passionate Republican; I tried to teach the parrot to say "Gore was robbed," but the bird was apparrotly a Republican too), it's the animals with whiskers, dogs and cats, that I prefer. Either they remind me of someone I dated, or of a cousin I see only at family reunions.

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