Southcoastphil

Resawing: Band saw vs table saw questions

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I want to resaw some stock on hand to make shelves for display cabinets and other smaller pieces.  Ideally I'd love to end up with material that's just shy of 3/8" thick by 2 to 3" wide for the 24-36"-long shelves in some the cabinets.   For other cabinets, 1/4" stock will be ok.

 

Here's what I plan to cut:

 

  • Red and white oak, up to 1x5 (0.77") and from 2' to 6' long
  • Mahogany 1x4 and 1x5, (0.77") up to 8' long
  • Soft woods (pine, spruce and fir) 2x3, 2x4, 1x6, up to 8' long
  • Reclaimed 5/4 (1.11") x 10, up to 6' long

 

I don't foresee cutting any more than 20 linear feet at a time, if that matters, 

 

Should I get a BS or just outfit my TS (10" Delta w/ 1.5 hp motor) with thin-kerf blade and zero-clearance throat plate ?  I've looked at what I'll call ultra-thin kerf blades, but at >$170 for a 5/64" Forrest or a 1/16" Infinity those are out of my budget.  0.091" kerf Freud blades go for about $80 and would leave me with HW stock that is close to my desired thickness.

 

Decades ago, I inherited many of my Dad's Delta tools (table saw, drill press, etc.) and, since those have proven to be nothing but bombproof, I'm leaning toward a 14" two-wheel Delta BS.  Most of what I've seen of late have a 1 hp motor, and some might have a 3/4 hp motor.  Note that I am new to BSs, and have just recently started studying them.

 

Q1:  Assuming that I properly tune the BS saw and use sharp/new blades, will either hp do the job?  (I plan to rip most of the boards to rough widths on a separate TS prior to resawing, unless you think that I could resaw HW 1x5s in one pass.)

 

Q2:  Acknowledging that there's no such thing as a "one blade that's perfect for every application", can you recommend BS blade types and perhaps brands that would meet my needs without breaking the bank?

 

Q3:  Do you have any suggestions for thin-kerf TS blades that are similar to the Freud I mentioned above?

 

As always, TIA for your insights.

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I have a bandsaw, so I would use that. But ya could do it with a table saw. Not 1 x 5 or 6, but smaller widths. Trick is to make two shallow passes  to protect yourself from the spinning blade. 

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If I had the shop space and the cash, I'd go with the bandsaw and get a wide blade with relatively few teeth per inch and the bigger motor. There's a reason they sell those whopper 3HP bandsaws- resawing- albeit for more and bigger pieces than you'll be doing.  I know a guy who is a truly gifted woodworker-  does it for some fun and a bit cash on the side-  beautiful furniture type work. He's got a really well equipped shop he's built up over years and just added a large bandsaw for this purpose.  However, he did most of his resawing on a TS for a long time.  On thicker boards he's actauly flip the board- taking multiple passes from each side and then finishing up the small strip in the middle on a not so large bandsaw that just didn't have the power to cut the whole thing.  I'm just an occasional weekend hack and my TS is nothing special, and I get nervous cutting close to the fence (although I am guessgn there may be a smarter way to do this than a thin strip at the fence.  Although it would probably have more waste, given the length of the shelves, I'd probably cut the 8' length closer to length before resawing to make it easier to handle.   WRT TS blades, on the recommendations of my acquaintance I bought a Diablo thin kerf rip blade. They are pretty cheap and work well.  He told me he doesn't bother with buying eh high end blades any more and trygn to deal with resharpening.  He's got a pretty nice saw (SawStop cabinet saw) with plenty of HP and for many of his glue-ups he goes right from the TS to glue up . Only bought himself a jointer recently and I cant' recall why. 

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Just dawned on me-  with the 1x stock you wont' be able to get 2 boards that are at 3/8, at least not  the TS approach and probably not with the BS either once you clean it up after the resaw.  It wouldn't be the best use of materials, but maybe just run through a planer if you have one?

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Thanks guys.

 

52 mins ago, rathrbefishn said:

Just dawned on me-  with the 1x stock you wont' be able to get 2 boards that are at 3/8, at least not  the TS approach and probably not with the BS either once you clean it up after the resaw.  It wouldn't be the best use of materials, but maybe just run through a planer if you have one?

I do not have a planer.  If I did (and I was willing to accept some 40% decrease in yield), I'd just rip it on the TS to ~1/2" and then plane it.  Maybe I'll start looking for a planer?

 

RE thickness:

Table saw

initial stock thickness - TS blade kerf = usable stock thickness

0.77" - 0.09" = 0.68"  

That's two pieces at 0.34" thick 

I can live with about 11/32" thickness.  Allowing for some imprecision still leaves me with 5/16", which I'd have to live with in the TS approach. 

 

Band saw

0.77" - 0.025" = 0.745"  

That's two pieces at 0.3725" thick, which is just about 3/8" (3/8" = 0.375") and an improvement over the TS approach.  

 

(Please correct my math if I erred.)

 

1 hour ago, Ben Lippen said:

I have a bandsaw, so I would use that. But ya could do it with a table saw. Not 1 x 5 or 6, but smaller widths. Trick is to make two shallow passes  to protect yourself from the spinning blade. 

By that, I assume that you mean flipping the stock after cutting it at 1/2 height, which I can do.  That also provides for cleaner cuts, IMO, with less load on the motor and less opportunity for scoring the wood.

 

Once I get going, I'll make some jigs with sacrificial fences and push sticks just for these projects.  

 

As for blades, I've just ID'd a few candidates:

Freud Industrial 10" x 24T Thin Kerf Rip Blade LU87R010 (FTG) $44

Freud 10" x 30T Industrial Thin Kerf Glue Line Ripping Blade LM75R010 (TCG) $60

Diablo 10 in. x 24-Teeth Ripping Saw Blade (ATB) $30 

 

I'm leaning toward the first one, primarily because the flat top blades can also be used for cutting thin dados and rabbets.

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Boy, doing either of these methods without a planer and you'll have to have perfect form. The blades will need to be like brand new sharp, featherboards on the tablesaw, on the band saw the guides perfectly adjusted so the blade won't wobble, and you can't stop or glitch during your cut. Hard to do. Before I got a metal mill I once tuned up my bandsaw (gold standard old Rockwell with the steel cutting gears) to cut a bevel in 1.5" brass. It worked, but that was just 6" not 8'!  As said above, I'd cut them to just over final length before resawing. It's when you're trying to shift your hands on a long piece that you get the dings.

 

If it were me, I'd cut it with the bandsaw, then take a tiny cleaning pass on the tablesaw to smooth it out. Featherboards before and after the blade.

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2 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

By that, I assume that you mean flipping the stock after cutting it at 1/2 height, which I can do.  That also provides for cleaner cuts, IMO, with less load on the motor and less opportunity for scoring the wood.

Exactly. Not long ago I did a steam bend trim piece that required me to rip 5/4" x 3" Sapele into 3/16" thick strips for steaming. I use a Diablo standard thin kerf blade in my table saw.  ( Ya hafta remember that the thinner the blade, the more wobble at the tooth, so the higher the blade is above the table the more deflection there is and thus a wider cut. ) Anyway, and pay attention here ;

 

4 hours ago, rathrbefishn said:

and I get nervous cutting close to the fence (although I am guessgn there may be a smarter way to do this than a thin strip at the fence.

 

You never want the blade near the fence when ripping anything. Tablesaws,  NEVER trap the wood between the cutter and the fence. If you need an 1/8" strip off a 3" piece, you set the fence so the inside tooth of the blade is at 2 3/4 roughly.  Allowing for the kerf.

 

But anyway, I set my blade depth just past half the height of the board, and set the fence so that I would have 3/16 leftover. I did that four times with the 5/4 rotating the board end over end each time. All I needed after that was to sand them a bit with an orbital mostly to get the burn marks off. You will get them.

Edited by Ben Lippen

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I use a Freud LU84 blade for this kind of work, I hate thin kerf blades because they don't stay flat during a tough cut. A Delta Contractor saw has the balls to cut maple or oak up to at least 2 inches, I'd make two passes of half the board width and hit it with an orbital sander after. If the saw is aligned properly and you get the feed speed right, you might not even have to sand at all. Make a finger jig to help hold the board tight against the fence. Use a riving knife if you have one on the saw

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If you go with the bandsaw, look up the wood working shows with Alex Snodgrass's band saw clinic on u tube. Although you may not use the products he is using, he will get you on the right track for setting up the bandsaw for resaw work.

Edited by tonymo
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On 11/5/2019 at 6:56 PM, Ben Lippen said:

 

 

 I did that four times with the 5/4 rotating the board end over end each time.

This is important if using table saw,you want the same face against the fence for all passes.

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18 mins ago, cdsleeve said:

I have an old 36" Crescent I use for resawing :)

 

OK. Yes. Yours IS bigger! Nice pile of old iron you got there.

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You mention that you would like to re-saw these boards. On my first reading of the original questions, I was assuming that this was for the purpose of having grain matching boards for glue up, which I would definitely use a bandsaw.

Upon  further reading it seems that the need is to simply dimension the thickness of the wood. If this is truly the case then a thickness planer is the tool of choice. 

 

With that said, although you can resaw with a table saw, the bandsaw is safer IMHO. Only with enough jigs/hold downs would I consider resawing boards of those widths on a table saw.

 

On a bandsaw. A sharp wide blade is a must and the bandsaw needs to be properly tuned (I.e. surrounding blocks) otherwise the blade will want to drift.

 

always thing safety first

 

hope this helps

 

cdsleeve, nice old iron

 

regards

anthony

Edited by AnthonyT
Typos

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