codfish

Stripe bass are moving North WAY North

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"Stripers have been confirmed to be reproducing in two different spawning grounds, including in the bay at Beauport, near Quebec City, where the CAQ government has proposed building a third link to the provincial capital.

Protecting those spawning grounds is critical to maintaining the species, said Prof. Pascal Sirois, who teaches fisheries ecology at the Université du Québec in Chicoutimi. For that reason, he said the striped bass's "threatened" status should be maintained."

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They have been in the St. Lawrence Seaway for quite sometime now. Many Canadians view them as an invasive species competing with and eating their adored native salmon.

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There was a guy on here awhile back from cape breton.  He caught some real beautiful fish approaching 50 lbs up there.  The Miramachi stock is doing very well. People like to blame them for killing salmonids but Canadian scientists say not so, rivers with no stripers have the same low returns of salmon. I might take a trip up there next August with the family. Its beautiful either way

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13 hours ago, codfish said:

"Stripers have been confirmed to be reproducing in two different spawning grounds, including in the bay at Beauport, near Quebec City, where the CAQ government has proposed building a third link to the provincial capital.

Protecting those spawning grounds is critical to maintaining the species, said Prof. Pascal Sirois, who teaches fisheries ecology at the Université du Québec in Chicoutimi. For that reason, he said the striped bass's "threatened" status should be maintained."

We are happy about the reintroduction of striped bass.It's an awesome sport fish. The spawning grounds you mention are not used by the Miramichi striped bass...Striped bass have been reintroduced in the upper St-Lawrence since the 90's using the Miramichi strain...They don't  go too far...Fish taken on the Gaspe Peninsula and the St-Lawrence North Shore are mainly Miramichi migrating fish, probably exploring in hope of a better world  :)

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14 hours ago, MakoMike said:

They have been in the St. Lawrence Seaway for quite sometime now. Many Canadians view them as an invasive species competing with and eating their adored native salmon.

Stripers and Atlantic Salmon have been native to the St. Lawrence Seaway since the last ice sheet receded just like the Atlantic Salmon, so they've been co-habitating for about 12,000 years, according to Fisheries and Oceans Canada.  Canada Striped Bass Q&A

 

9. Question:

Is striped bass an invasive species to the Miramichi River and the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence?

 

9. Answer:

No, striped bass is historically native to the Miramichi River and to the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence. The species has always spanned the Atlantic coast from the St. Lawrence River to Louisiana.

10. Question:

Some people think that the best way to help Atlantic salmon is to kill as many striped bass as possible. Can this help the recovery of salmon?

 

10. Answer:

No. Striped bass predation is not the determining factor in the abundance of adult Atlantic salmon returning to home waters. The unlimited killing or harming of striped bass is also illegal.

 

At the end of the last ice age, 19 freshwater and nine diadromous fish species, including Atlantic salmon and striped bass, colonized the Maritime Provinces’ rivers and have co-evolved since then. A complex predator-prey relationship has developed and exists between striped bass and Atlantic salmon – and amongst other species – however, that relationship is not fully understood and is limited to estuaries where striped bass and juvenile Atlantic salmon are both presents during a short period in the spring.

 

In general, returns of adult Atlantic salmon follow similar abundance patterns across the entire species’ range – a range in which striped bass do not occur in the majority of salmon rivers. Given that numbers of salmon returning to their natal rivers follow the same pattern whether or not striped bass are present suggests that the survival of Atlantic salmon is driven by limiting factors experienced while they are in the marine environment. This reinforces that striped bass predation is not the determining factor in the abundance of adult Atlantic salmon returning to home water

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This leads me to wonder if the decline of Atlantic Salmon is related to the decline in northern shrimp? I live hear Acadia and 10 or so years ago locals fished for shrimp and you could buy them everywhere. Most were egg bearing. The flesh of wild Atlantic salmon is the same deep orange color as the shrimp from the Gulf of Maine. Last year more than 40 wild salmon went through the fishway on the Narraguagus River in Cherryfield which is up from years when only a few went up to spawn. The Penobscot may have had better numbers but it is much larger river. Ironically striped bass are also counted in the Penobscot. i'm not sure they go through the Narraguagus but I've caught shorts and an occasional keeper downriver where it empties into the ocean. Biologists suggest there is a strain of bass native to the Kennebec which is another huge river. 

 

My point is that stripers and salmon co-exist now and have since at least the last ice age 100,000 years ago. On rare occasions you hear of  a striper caught ice fishing in lakes downeast that are thought to be landlocks but may have made it upstream to certain ponds and lakes.. 

 

I will say that around here the lobster industry does not want to see a surge in striped bass numbers because they eat lobster especially after they shed the old shells and are soft. 

 

As much as we try to control nature the more we see how fragile it is and how easy it is to mess it up which is usually done by over fishing. My example is that perhaps the over harvest of northern shrimp has caused the decline in salmon numbers. that along with the fact that the Gulf of Maine is warming faster than any body of water on earth.  

 

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The decline on salmon is due to overfishing, nothing more. 
 

the waters in that area are warming and most likely leading to better conditions for bass and worse conditions for salmon. 
 

 

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1 hour ago, Ted Pietz said:

This leads me to wonder if the decline of Atlantic Salmon is related to the decline in northern shrimp? I live hear Acadia and 10 or so years ago locals fished for shrimp and you could buy them everywhere. Most were egg bearing. The flesh of wild Atlantic salmon is the same deep orange color as the shrimp from the Gulf of Maine. Last year more than 40 wild salmon went through the fishway on the Narraguagus River in Cherryfield which is up from years when only a few went up to spawn. The Penobscot may have had better numbers but it is much larger river. Ironically striped bass are also counted in the Penobscot. i'm not sure they go through the Narraguagus but I've caught shorts and an occasional keeper downriver where it empties into the ocean. Biologists suggest there is a strain of bass native to the Kennebec which is another huge river. 

 

My point is that stripers and salmon co-exist now and have since at least the last ice age 100,000 years ago. On rare occasions you hear of  a striper caught ice fishing in lakes downeast that are thought to be landlocks but may have made it upstream to certain ponds and lakes.. 

 

I will say that around here the lobster industry does not want to see a surge in striped bass numbers because they eat lobster especially after they shed the old shells and are soft. 

 

As much as we try to control nature the more we see how fragile it is and how easy it is to mess it up which is usually done by over fishing. My example is that perhaps the over harvest of northern shrimp has caused the decline in salmon numbers. that along with the fact that the Gulf of Maine is warming faster than any body of water on earth.  

 

The last Ice Age started about 25,000 years ago and ended completely about 15,000 years ago - not 100,000.

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Thanks for the fact checking.. Wonder when the next ice age will come or if it is on its way? All that ice that is melting in the arctic and pouring into the Gulf Stream may be a factor.

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i live and fish in the st-laurent river and see and catch stripers only for the last couple years,  Seen panels everywhere for as long as i can remember saying it was a protected specie and release was mandatory. seen em eat my mackerels, cods, even eating small lobsters. heck even sharks are following em now.  Salmon fishermens are slowly changing from  river salmon setups to beach striper setups.
being on the rocks at least 4 days a week every summer, ive seen numbers grow dramatically from small school or 10/20 stripers to hundreds of em this year. but, what responsible for the decline of other species is and has always been the mindless government approved commercial fisheries of bottom fish with questionnable methods. this summer they where raking the bottom for sea cucumber near the coast, bottom is clean shaved now and all the habitat lands on the beaches once we get a good north east wind/waves. ''scientists'' can say whatever they want, i attribute the diminishing numbers directly to the lax methods of commercial fishing in my area and the fact that some cities upstream still dump their **** in the water when they feel the need to. nothing to do with recreative/survival fishing. i can predict with certainty that when the govt take things in their hands we will see a definitive decline in strippers as well. here they are like rocks, only dumber.

im currently looking at taking training for hunting seals like my father did when i was young. but its worthless if the govt decides they can attributes ''quotas'' to commercial fisheries wich they will do if they ever feel they can get some returns on it.

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1 hour ago, jerome gagnon said:

i live and fish in the st-laurent river and see and catch stripers only for the last couple years,  Seen panels everywhere for as long as i can remember saying it was a protected specie and release was mandatory. seen em eat my mackerels, cods, even eating small lobsters. heck even sharks are following em now.  Salmon fishermens are slowly changing from  river salmon setups to beach striper setups.
being on the rocks at least 4 days a week every summer, ive seen numbers grow dramatically from small school or 10/20 stripers to hundreds of em this year. but, what responsible for the decline of other species is and has always been the mindless government approved commercial fisheries of bottom fish with questionnable methods. this summer they where raking the bottom for sea cucumber near the coast, bottom is clean shaved now and all the habitat lands on the beaches once we get a good north east wind/waves. ''scientists'' can say whatever they want, i attribute the diminishing numbers directly to the lax methods of commercial fishing in my area and the fact that some cities upstream still dump their **** in the water when they feel the need to. nothing to do with recreative/survival fishing. i can predict with certainty that when the govt take things in their hands we will see a definitive decline in strippers as well. here they are like rocks, only dumber.

im currently looking at taking training for hunting seals like my father did when i was young. but its worthless if the govt decides they can attributes ''quotas'' to commercial fisheries wich they will do if they ever feel they can get some returns on it.

So do you think those large fish on cape brenton come from down here or native to there. ?

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honestly, i could'nt tell, like i said, there are now sharks around here and there where none a few years back. species are following normal and perpetual change in climates is the most logical explanation i could come with. nothing humans can do about this. but, commercial fishing methods can an do have an influence by changing the bottom (habitat) landscape, displacing species like cod for more than 20 years may have had an influence on what kind of bait and quantities spawn thus the variant on species that can adapt or must move.

best guess is that those big fish where not so far away, just look around and see what kind of fishing was done commercially and wich methods where used and you'll soon see some correlations.  where im at i observed em and lived em in real time, thus my doubt in ''believing'' the crap our govt organisations try to peddle us...

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Striped bass historically spawned in all the way up and down the coast before we showed up decimated the population and blocked or polluted nearly all major New England rivers and estuaries.  Tons of evidence of this...

Check out "A Report on the Historic Spawning Grounds of the Striped Bass, Morone Saxatilis" Michael J. Little for a brief overview. can read with a free account on Jstor.  

 

Hope they return as these places keep getting cleaned up and the population recovers (knock on wood).  

 

 

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