robc22

Well the market is there....

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I'm sure that if killing seals were legal, there would be a large market for their carcasses. I don't think this market would be so much for human consumption as food but rather for the products that could be produced through a rendering process. Products such as soap, shampoo, body oils, pellets to be used as food for chickens or in aquaculture and many others could be produced I'm sure.

 

Back in the late 1970's when I was working at the Quincy Shipyard when I went back to college, I recall seeing railroad tanker car after car loaded with animal renderings headed for Proctor and Gamble where this nasty mess was converted into useful products. The same could be done with seal carcasses.

 

Of course the PC Liberal people of MA would never allow this to happen no matter what the Federal Government would decide. It would offend someone for sure.

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1 hour ago, MakoMike said:

I've eaten jellyfish and I wouldn't say that. It doesn't have a strong taste, but it definitely has a taste. 

That makes you the closest to an expert as I can find.

My comment came from a five minute google education. 

 

I think it's a typical American attitude that we all assume jellyfish tastes yucky but seal meat should taste good.

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I Watched an episode of bizarre foods last night and he was eating seal meat with members of the Tlingit tribe. It looked more appetizing than the fish oil they were extracting out of hundreds of lbs of rotten hooligan.

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8 hours ago, snookster said:

I'm sure that if killing seals were legal, there would be a large market for their carcasses. I don't think this market would be so much for human consumption as food but rather for the products that could be produced through a rendering process. Products such as soap, shampoo, body oils, pellets to be used as food for chickens or in aquaculture and many others could be produced I'm sure.

 

Back in the late 1970's when I was working at the Quincy Shipyard when I went back to college, I recall seeing railroad tanker car after car loaded with animal renderings headed for Proctor and Gamble where this nasty mess was converted into useful products. The same could be done with seal carcasses.

 

Of course the PC Liberal people of MA would never allow this to happen no matter what the Federal Government would decide. It would offend someone for sure.

Good ol Fore River.You must have worked on the LNG Tankers.Spent some time crawling around,over and under those beasts.Served on a ship built there too.Lots of stories on that river.

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20 hours ago, snookster said:

 

 

Of course the PC Liberal people of MA would never allow this to happen no matter what the Federal Government would decide. It would offend someone for sure.

Of course you are correct about PC Ma people, but even setting them, and PETA et al aside for a minute, think about what it would take to change the public perception of fur as fashion.

 

It's not just the peta types and their creepy late night tv ads that put fur out of business. 

People who eat loads of meat and never think about any other animal rights cause wouldn't even consider buying a fur coat.

Those are the people that would have to be convinced fur was "IN" before "the market" would be there. 

And of course, their minds would have to be changed despite a no-stop barrage of tv and FB ads of bloody seal clubbing.

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Interesting breakdown of the state of the fur trade. Bullet points make it easy to skim to key topics.

Basically, a slight uptick in high end fur fashion for rich people but fur farms represent 85% of the source.

Meanwhile worldwide, trapping is under siege and being banned across the US and the globe.

Seal skin will forever be at a disadvantage due to only babies being desirable. Public image of seal clubbing can't be overcome in the face of PC farmed mink.

One take away is the number of fur farms in the traditional seal harvest countries. Even where seal harvest is still part of the picture, the money is in farms.

 

 

"VIII. Conclusion

The fur industry is predominantly supported by fur farming.   It seems, due to the ease in regulating an animal’s reproduction and coat quality through farming that this method will continue to predominate over hunting."

 

https://www.animallaw.info/article/detailed-discussion-fur-animals-and-fur-production

 

N

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