robc22

Well the market is there....

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3 hours ago, mitchman said:

I have some knowledge on this subject and would add some points of consideration:

 

1 - There currently is not a significant market for seal meat. The indigenous (Inuit, etc.) populations that do harvest them are small populations that wouldn't be able to consume a large volume of animals. If they were, they would already be doing so and Canada wouldn't need to look to export. Indigenous populations also traditionally ate their meat based on subsistence living during winter, but many of these same populations have enough modern amenities that the practice isn’t as popular. Some indigenous folks on Cape Cod have explored the idea of creating a market for meat and fur, but the problem is they could only sell on their land and wouldn’t be able to export out of the country. Reality is modern societies aren't that interested in eating marine mammals as even in Japanese the whale market has a large unsold surplus with its popularity declining drastically in the last few decades. So if you're going to create a serious market its going to create a lot of work.

 

2 – In order to create a domestic or export market in the US the MMPA would have to be overturned or amended through an act of Congress as currently it outlaws the sale, trade and even possession of meat, furs, bones, etc. However, the current political climate may be favorable to this as there was an exemptions to kill up to 93 sea lions at Willamette Falls in Oregon to protect spawning steelhead, but this work was done in cooperation with local tribes and would be difficult to get approved on a large scale (1000s) to make any impact as Environmental groups would lobby hard against it.

 

3 - Seal meat is full of contaminants such as mercury, PCBs, etc. being apex predators that live a long time...worse than tuna, swordfish, sharks, etc. Being mammals they also carry a host of communicable diseases to humans like influenza, herpes, giardia, e. coli and seal finger (flesh wasting disease). So careful harvest, preparation, and handling would be key…the last thing you need is for there to be a herpes outbreak from eating seal meat 'cause there goes your market.

 

4 - Would agree that there could be a market for the fur, especially internationally, but the question is what do you do with all that meat in the meantime? If you are running a commercial operation you simply can't just dump it back into the ocean as it would be illegal and just attract more sharks anyways. Landfilling thousands of animals would be expensive and "seal mass graves" would be a point of contention with environmental groups.

 

5 - Making them into fertilizer or feed would be subject to the same laws as above. Additionally, if you're using seals to make feed/diet pills then you will be passing on those high levels of contaminants with them to the cattle or people that are further concentrated as extracts. To use as fertilizer would require extensive processing so you don't have rotting diseased corpses contaminating the soil for crops. Imagine an e. coli outbreak from seal fertilizer.....

 

6 - There are organizations on Cape Cod (IFAW, WHOI, PCCS, etc.) that respond to marine mammals strandings/deaths including whales, dolphins, seals, and even turtles. They are on top of this stuff and every time there is a dead seal it gets reported with so many concerned citizens out there. To point, they receive numerous nuisance calls of 'stranded' seals on the beach especially in winter/spring as naive people think they're sick or hurt but they're just chilling and doing their thing. Point is most injured/dead animals get reported and a visit from a response team so poachings wouldn't go unnoticed.

 

7 - The Cape Cod grey seal population is 30-50,000 animals, but its only a small portion of the greater North Atlantic population centered in Sable Island, Canada that's about 500,000 animals. This population on Cape Cod isn't a static, resident population as various tracking studies indicate they move frequently between the Cape, Islands, and Canada spending weeks offshore. The result? Even if you kill every single seal on the beach today, there are thousands of reinforcements that could arrive within weeks that we're already on their way anyways.

 

8 - A poacher could probably kill a few dozen seals a day, but that doesn't even make a dent in the population. As soon as you get a single “mass killing” poaching event, the FEDs will be out in force to investigate and then patrol/enforce to prevent any future poaching. The bodies would be hard to hide. Killing a seal or any marine mammal is a federal crime, much more serious that getting caught by EPOs for keeping an undersized bass which is a small fine from the state. We’re talking thousands or tens of thousands of dollars and jail time. Who really wants to take that risk?

 

9 - You're not going to be able to reduce the seal population enough to deter sharks from the area because even a 50% reduction in the seal population still leaves 15-25K animals, which is plenty of food for the sharks that only need to eat every few weeks anyways. 

The reality is seals and sharks are here to stay. Personally I'm not necessarily against a managed population or market creation, but in the end I think it would be more of a 'feel good' measure for fisherman that really wouldn't have a significant population impact as hoped. 

 

 

well researched and well said, thanks for posting.

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1 hour ago, mitchman said:

Probably not but I mean they made an exception in Oregon for killing close to 100 seals annually to protect steelhead, and with the current administration favoring business/comm fishermen over environmental issues you never know what's possible until someone tries...

Well, I take your point. But it wasn't really 100, more like a couple of dozen and they weren't seals they were sea lions. But that was an administrative action, repealing the MMPA would have to go through Congress as well. I don't think there is snowballs chance in hell repealing the MMPA. Maybe, at best and its still a long shot, you might be able to get an exemption for a particular area and species.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Well I started this thread because of my concern with the seals,,,,,,,Ended up in an awful fight with MichaelZ and others.........We are more or less on the same side.....Mako mike, Jason, mikez, fizzy.......All good inputs from these very knowledgeable gents......I guess it a win even to talk about this.....Respect you guys 2much to turn this into a hate hate......Peace out brothers.......:th: :)

Edited by robc22

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Is their milk any good? Just asking. They reproduce incredibly fast so maybe their is a market for their milk. Bring all of them to Nevada.  Cortez would love that as part of her new deal. Seals dont fart. Scientific fact.!

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23 mins ago, FEW3 said:

Super fast!

Seriously, you are repeating Conventional Wisdom considered Gospel by the Anti-Seal Armchair Biologists.

 

What is the rate of reproduction of grey seals in US waters?

Everyone knows it's "Super fast!", that's common knowledge, right?

 

So how fast is super fast?

Fast as mice? Rabbits? Those are considered the super fast repoducers. Where do grey seals fall on that scale?

 

Come at it another way;

How old till females mate?

How long is gestation?

How old do females stay fertile?

How many babies max can one female have in her lifetime, if none die?

 

If you really want to know, all that info is available. 

 

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On ‎10‎/‎31‎/‎2019 at 0:32 PM, smellfish said:

We need to get the Japanese interested in Seal ... once the are on it they will just about drive it to extinction. The objective is to formulate a recipe for Seal Sushi that has the same effects as Viagra or cures a cold and the Japanese will be all over it. Maybe it will divert their attention from the whales.

Just tell them it's better than bear gall bladders, livers and penises and won't be as hotly contested as killing dolphins.

Maybe spread the word to other parts of the world that seal is better than ground rhino horn, and their teeth are more prized than ivory. Hell, even tell them it will extend life by years and see what happens?

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Just watched a show about jellyfish. The Chinese are now catching and eating jellyfish they had deemed inedible until they killed off all there fish.

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16 hours ago, TonyO said:

Just watched a show about jellyfish. The Chinese are now catching and eating jellyfish they had deemed inedible until they killed off all there fish.

????

The Chinese have been eating jellyfish for 1500 years. They grow jellyfish in aquaculture industry. There's like a half a dozen species at least that are edible. 

The worldwide jellyfish industry is in the hundreds of tons and it's always been there. 

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1 hour ago, mikez2 said:

????

The Chinese have been eating jellyfish for 1500 years. They grow jellyfish in aquaculture industry. There's like a half a dozen species at least that are edible. 

The worldwide jellyfish industry is in the hundreds of tons and it's always been there. 

They'll be a slot limit on jellyfish before you know it.

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1 hour ago, bob_G said:

They'll be a slot limit on jellyfish before you know it.

I think some jellyfish are harvested in the US for the asian market. I don't know if the edible types are found in New England.

 

Maybe the new elvers?

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13 hours ago, mikez2 said:

Supposedly the jellyfish has almost no taste.

I've eaten jellyfish and I wouldn't say that. It doesn't have a strong taste, but it definitely has a taste. 

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