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Eating bunker

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Elias did a trash fish catch and cook episode on his YouTube channel with bunker. I forget how he prepared it, but iirc he took one bite and said it wasn't bad, took another bite and said nope, he was wrong, it's bad. I don't think there was a third bite.

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2 mins ago, chitala383 said:

Elias did a trash fish catch and cook episode on his YouTube channel with bunker. I forget how he prepared it, but iirc he took one bite and said it wasn't bad, took another bite and said nope, he was wrong, it's bad. I don't think there was a third bite.

It’s better if you let it sit out in the sun for a couple weeks and let it ferment. It’s an ancient oriental food preservation trick that allowed them to store fish for over a year without refrigeration. Menhaden takes a while because of how oily it is, but if you made a small cedar box, put the fish in it with a little salt and let it sit exposed for a couple weeks it’s actually quite good. 

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46 mins ago, chessie_yaker said:

It’s better if you let it sit out in the sun for a couple weeks and let it ferment. It’s an ancient oriental food preservation trick that allowed them to store fish for over a year without refrigeration. Menhaden takes a while because of how oily it is, but if you made a small cedar box, put the fish in it with a little salt and let it sit exposed for a couple weeks it’s actually quite good. 

If you're serious I don't think we can be friends anymore.

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Historically, even the Native Americans didn't eat them. They were used as fertilizer for plants in which Squanto taught the Pilgrims. 

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2 mins ago, Dah seee said:

Historically, even the Native Americans didn't eat them. They were used as fertilizer for plants in which Squanto taught the Pilgrims. 

Ah I think that Squanto taught the Pilgrims to use river herring as fertilizer for plants not menhaden.  At least that's what they taught us in grammar school here in Plymouth in the 1950's.

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33 mins ago, chitala383 said:

If you're serious I don't think we can be friends anymore.

Why you gotta blow up my spot Holmes 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Who can honestly tell me they've cut a bunker and eaten it's cooked flesh? Because if no one can then I'll feel compelled to do so my self......and when your jelious of my hickory smoked menheaden filets I'll have done the internet due justice.

Edited by DeepBlue85

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2 hours ago, peanutbunkerandjelly said:

I used to give them to an Arab guy at the gas station. Never really spoke about how he cooked em, but he accepted them multiple times.

 

 

Probably used it to catch the rats behind the station

 

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Leave a bucket of fresh bunker in the street of some war torn, third world country and I'm pretty sure it would be gratefully consumed by the residents. 

 

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If you read Peter Mattiessen's book Men's Lives, which chronicles the East End baymen, you'll find another of references to the old-time baymen eating bunker.  There is even a quote from someone--I think it was a bayman's wife--saying that they didn't understand what all of the fuss over striped bass was about, because if you wanted a fish with real flavor, you'd eat a bunker, which the person said they preferred.

 

History has a number of records of people in coastal communities eating things that we wouldn't eat today.  On the Outer Banks of North Carolina, the old-time residents once ate cormorants.  When a critter is the only thing that stands between you and starvation, you tend to eat it, and "acquire the taste."

 

Many, many years ago, when I still lived in Connecticut,  the wife of one of the older guys who had a boat at the dock engaged in French cooking as a hobby.  After he told her that menhaden weren't edible, she took up the challenge.  Apparently, she slow-cooked it for five or six hours, using various techniques, spices, etc. and from what the guy said, it came out pretty well.

 

Although if I really needed to eat a fish that badly, the freezer was emptly and I couldn't get out on the bay, I'd be far more likely to buy a can of tuna.

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What's the big deal, they are in the herring/shad family, and people eat those all the time. My friend (born in India) with a boat takes a few incidentally, and they go to the table. He hasn't stopped taking them, so they can't be terrible.

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