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hurricane1091

Striper population discussion from report thread

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15 hours ago, hurricane1091 said:

Funny enough the person above me just posted as I finished this post. He's right about pressure, it's totally true. It could be related in my case but we were in a private park of the creek that really wasn't pressured by anyone but us, but I guess it's possible still that they wised up since this past summer was fairly down compared to the previous two. One log I fished with great success always for two summers straight didn't produce at all this year. It was MONEY for a Texas rigged senko always but this year never a single take.

 

I'm a golf course superintendent. At the course I'm at now, I have a irrigation pond with pickerel, bass, crappie, etc. When I first got here, I could go out there and catch as many fish as I wanted. They would hit anything that moved. Fast forward four years, and I'm hard pressed to catch one fish. Despite visually being able to see the pond is still full of fish. They have just wised up to the pressure. 

 

I'm not sure it plays a part here, but maybe. We've seen from tagging data that very few fish are caught twice. And the area these fish can roam is so vast that I doubt a lot of them are truly being pressured. Who knows though?

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52 mins ago, PhilCVG said:

 

I'm a golf course superintendent. At the course I'm at now, I have a irrigation pond with pickerel, bass, crappie, etc. When I first got here, I could go out there and catch as many fish as I wanted. They would hit anything that moved. Fast forward four years, and I'm hard pressed to catch one fish. Despite visually being able to see the pond is still full of fish. They have just wised up to the pressure. 

 

I'm not sure it plays a part here, but maybe. We've seen from tagging data that very few fish are caught twice. And the area these fish can roam is so vast that I doubt a lot of them are truly being pressured. Who knows though?

I don't discount your thought process here. The only difference I would imagine is that there's a lot more stripers in the sea that haven't been caught and haven't wised up. I wouldn't imagine that there has been enough fish that just won't bite anymore to make fishing this difficult but who knows. LMB are interesting because I believe 100% small waters can be pressured and the fish wise up for sure. In fact, I'd argue the fishing hole I am referring to only got productive because I had switched tactics from years prior and after two successful years, the third was a down one. Seems difficult to occur since I am the only one really fishing the hole (that I know of, and it is "private" so really no one else should be) but who knows. I have also caught a LMB weeks after a friend of a friend did and we only knew this because it was again a private pond and the hook we still in the throat (which I was able to get out!).

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2 mins ago, hurricane1091 said:

I don't discount your thought process here. The only difference I would imagine is that there's a lot more stripers in the sea that haven't been caught and haven't wised up. I wouldn't imagine that there has been enough fish that just won't bite anymore to make fishing this difficult but who knows. 

 

No, I agree. I'm not sure it is a factor on striped bass. Too many fish. Too big of an area. The fish don't get real good looks at lures due to dirty water, darkness, wave action, etc. And tagging data has shown us how few fish get caught twice. 

 

I was simply saying I understand the theory, but I too doubt it has anything to do with the poor striped bass fishing. 

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2 hours ago, hurricane1091 said:

The only difference I would imagine is that there's a lot more stripers in the sea that haven't been caught and haven't wised up.

Theres also the fact that hundreds of thousands more people with high end electronics and state of the art technology, using the highest end gear available tracking these fish up and down the coast into every little nook and cranny.  They dont get a rest, from cape cod the Virginia they are pounded.

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19 hours ago, ChumSlickJon said:

Does anyone else have a feeling that maybe, and it's a pretty big maybe, the fish have learned where its safer?  

 

I've watched fish in salmon river learn what fishing line looks like and actually dodge it.  I've watched fish in ponds learn what to eat and not to eat.  What about the pattern of a new color always producing well when its first released?  Seen it first hand with nuclear chicken gulp.  

 

Maybe the bass stay offshore to dodge the million people trying to catch them?  

People are out there trying to catch 10-20 year old fish. They don't live that long for no reason. 

18 hours ago, bigfish4me said:

My home port is Townsend’s inlet.....I’ve been running out of that inlet for 30 years, my family for 50.  I’m primarily a boat guy but I do surf fish too. I agree with you that A lot of south jerseys structure was subtle....but you also had eel grass and clam beds to go along with those humps and bumps. 

 

Before beach replenisment and artificial reefs was a place called the table top ... It was between corsons and Ti....it was a Flounder factory all summer long and all but a gimme for stripers in November. That’s just one of thousands of spots dozed flat. We would save numbers to good pieces of natural structure, ridges humps etc.... that we did well with flounder at during the summer. We would hit the same spots in the fall and catch stripers ,  what Few fish do pass south jersey these days inside the fence are on the move and in a hurry .... it’s a desert. 

They definitely don't stick around long. 

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21 hours ago, Gully said:

The fish aren’t smarter. The surfcaster is getting worse...  

...because we're getting older, and weaker, and grumpier, and vision challenged, and our boots leak (oops. boots are sound. i peed.) and forgetful.  What are we talking about? 

Oh, the wash is devoid of marine life because is covered with ocean dirt that doesn't support it. 

I've always wondered if the structure -holes/depressions- that are created where the sea floor is removed for replenishment is more attractive to bait than the beaches for some reason.  It seems that the boats are often marking bait in these "borrow areas" off of LBI, albeit there are no fish -bass, blues, weakies- on them.  These fish bio-masses are severely depleted.  I don't give a rats petute what the data asserts and what the regulators regurgitate.

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If a striped bass populating can be established on the west coast from a couple hundred fish from Jersey in the late 1800's, it shouldn't be too hard to replenish/save the native east coast population in the 2000's.

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11 mins ago, Frugal Fisherman said:

If a striped bass populating can be established on the west coast from a couple hundred fish from Jersey in the late 1800's, it shouldn't be too hard to replenish/save the native east coast population in the 2000's.

Forget the west coast.  With our current bass population it should be much easier to recover than it was back in the 80's.  

*sly though.  No matter how many fish there are, some people are always going to complain.  

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14 mins ago, ChumSlickJon said:

Forget the west coast.  With our current bass population it should be much easier to recover than it was back in the 80's.  

*sly though.  No matter how many fish there are, some people are always going to complain.  

Not sure I heard too many complaints during the 90's into the early 2000's :cool:

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9 mins ago, cartopper said:

Not sure I heard too many complaints during the 90's into the early 2000's :cool:

Didnt have as many peta people with fishing rods.

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16 mins ago, ChumSlickJon said:

Forget the west coast.  With our current bass population it should be much easier to recover than it was back in the 80's.  

*sly though.  No matter how many fish there are, some people are always going to complain.  

I think one shouldn't overlook the west coast stripers in regards to increasing the East Coast biomass...it's kinda like a scientific experiment with a control group and a variable group. ...Maybe it would be beneficial to send some of those west coast fry back to the East coast..

 

From what I've read about west coast stripers is that they're mainly Sweetwater/river fish over there. It's the 21st century we should be able to figure it out.

 

 

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