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Wood stair tread over concrete

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Hi forum.

Took out a large concrete hearth and installed a entry door to the garage. 

The room is on a slab.

The baseboard pipe runs into the remaining concrete from the hearth (pictured) and may enter the slab somewhere in the doorway.

Logic (my logic, so....) said cut the hearth and use it as a step.

Want to put a wood tread and riser over the concrete.

Want to basically build a box that fits over the concrete.

Given the safety (walking on it) element the question is the best way to create a stable attachment to or around the concrete?

Likely a tile floor going down in front of the step.

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Edited by NaturalScience

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You can use a combination of construction adhesive and Ramset/tapcons. More than likely, just one or the other would be enough but both would ensure that thing ain't moving. 

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2 hours ago, Scallywag said:

You can use a combination of construction adhesive and Ramset/tapcons. More than likely, just one or the other would be enough but both would ensure that thing ain't moving. 

I can't think of one I've done, and that's alot, where i haven't had to use both tapcons and Hilti shots.

I always bring both set ups for just that reason. Plus tubes of PL.

 

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3 hours ago, NaturalScience said:

The baseboard pipe runs into the remaining concrete from the hearth (pictured) and may enter the slab somewhere in the doorway.

Logic (my logic, so....) said cut the hearth and use it as a step.

Want to put a wood tread and riser over the concrete.

Want to basically build a box that fits over the concrete.

Given the safety (walking on it) element the question is the best way to create a stable attachment to or around the concrete?

Likely a tile floor going down in front of the step.

Okay, your use of the word confuses. As the word hearth means the area in front of a fireplace. What you have there is just a step.

Now, you say that a heat BBHW pipe runs through that step somewhere?

It's very important to know what and where that is.

You obviously don't want to shoot or screw anywhere near that. But PL is your friend.

 

More importantly even is what the height is from your step right now ( all of the way through the swing of the door ! ) , to the bottom of the door allowing for the sweep. This will determine what you can use to top the step. 

It appears from the picture that you only have an inch and maybe a bit. 

 

I really need more info to help further.

 

 

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Thanks Scally.

Seems so obvious now.

I think I will put 2x around the sides of the "step" flush with the top, anchored with the tapcons. Screwing into that plus adhesive should hold that tread in place and give me enough surface area to keep the riser in place.

When attaching the tread and riser to the wood beneath would it be best to screw it through the face and use plugs to cover the screws?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

20 mins ago, Ben Lippen said:

Okay, your use of the word confuses. As the word hearth means the area in front of a fireplace. What you have there is just a step.

Now, you say that a heat BBHW pipe runs through that step somewhere?

It's very important to know what and where that is.

You obviously don't want to shoot or screw anywhere near that. But PL is your friend.

 

More importantly even is what the height is from your step right now ( all of the way through the swing of the door ! ) , to the bottom of the door allowing for the sweep. This will determine what you can use to top the step. 

It appears from the picture that you only have an inch and maybe a bit. 

 

I really need more info to help further.

 

 

The "hearth" was a 6" tall mass of concrete that has been cut down to approximately 12" from the wall.  The "step" is about 50" wide by 6" high by 12" deep.

The pipe, as far as I can tell, runs along the wall. I can't truly say for certain exactly where it is but common sense (I hope they used this) would say it hugs the wall and enters the slab straight down.

As far as the area between the top of the concrete step and the bottom of the door sill I would say about an inch is correct. The total distance from the top of the concrete to the door sweep I'm not certain off hand but I'm pretty certain it will accommodate a 3/4" thick tread.

I'll get the exact measurement from the top of the step to the bottom of the door from my brother when he gets home.  His house.

Edited by NaturalScience

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Okay, thanks for the help.

If you have an inch on top roughly you can put down 5/4 acq decking as the tread. Glued and maybe screwed if you feel confident about the pipe location. 

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50 mins ago, NaturalScience said:

Thanks Scally.

Seems so obvious now.

I think I will put 2x around the sides of the "step" flush with the top, anchored with the tapcons. Screwing into that plus adhesive should hold that tread in place and give me enough surface area to keep the riser in place.

When attaching the tread and riser to the wood beneath would it be best to screw it through the face and use plugs to cover the screws?

You can use plugs/dowels to cover the screws if they are going to bother you. Tapcon does make a tapered head screw, so that you can counter sink. 

1 hour ago, Ben Lippen said:

I can't think of one I've done, and that's alot, where i haven't had to use both tapcons and Hilti shots.

I always bring both set ups for just that reason. Plus tubes of PL.

 

I am not a fan of Tapcons, personally. I've had much better success with my Ramset. The gun paid for itself in the few times I've used it. The Tapcons are expensive and I never feel I get the hold I desire. PL or whatever adhesive you desire is added insurance. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I hope this is legible enough to decipher but this is what I'm planning, now that you guys helped me.

 

Sorry I did a terrible job with the back story. 

The hearth as I called it was a roughly 5'x5'x6" poured slab of concrete covered in slate and brick, on which an old wood burning stove Sat. The brick and slate were removed from the floor as well as the brick heat shield on the wall. The remaining concrete slab was cut and broken down to the 12"x50"x6" "step" that was pictured.

 

It is a "den" in the interior of the home, so he wants it to be a finished look. He is getting a hard wood stair tread made to the dimensions needed which is why I'm thinking plugs for the screw holes.

20191027_184409.jpg

Edited by NaturalScience

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1 hour ago, NaturalScience said:

I hope this is legible enough to decipher but this is what I'm planning, now that you guys helped me.

 

Sorry I did a terrible job with the back story. 

The hearth as I called it was a roughly 5'x5'x6" poured slab of concrete covered in slate and brick, on which an old wood burning stove Sat. The brick and slate were removed from the floor as well as the brick heat shield on the wall. The remaining concrete slab was cut and broken down to the 12"x50"x6" "step" that was pictured.

 

It is a "den" in the interior of the home, so he wants it to be a finished look. He is getting a hard wood stair tread made to the dimensions needed which is why I'm thinking plugs for the screw holes.

20191027_184409.jpg

I was under the assumption that you were using PT (pressure treated) wood. You cannot put finished wood directly over the concrete. You're going to have to use some type of vapor barrier. I would suggest a penetrating sealant, or at least a topcoat sealant maybe. Maybe a rot resistant hardwood wood be a good idea too. 

 

Or... You could put PT down and then a finish wood over that but that's probably going to add too much height. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

41 mins ago, Scallywag said:

I was under the assumption that you were using PT (pressure treated) wood. You cannot put finished wood directly over the concrete. You're going to have to use some type of vapor barrier. I would suggest a penetrating sealant, or at least a topcoat sealant maybe. Maybe a rot resistant hardwood wood be a good idea too. 

 

Or... You could put PT down and then a finish wood over that but that's probably going to add too much height. 

Ah, thank you.

I have a penetrating sealer from doing my basement. I'll definitely use that and additionally get something in between the hardwood and concrete.  I'll use PT 2x material as well. 

And really, thank you guys so much.  

Edited by NaturalScience

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I will play devil's advocate here... I know you just cut out all but 12" of the hearth... Would you consider building out a landing at least the width of the door? I would have to check code to be sure, but I think you should have a landing that you can stand on and be able to open the door, as well as a landing to step down onto...

 

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9 hours ago, nightfighter said:

I will play devil's advocate here... I know you just cut out all but 12" of the hearth... Would you consider building out a landing at least the width of the door? I would have to check code to be sure, but I think you should have a landing that you can stand on and be able to open the door, as well as a landing to step down onto...

 

I'll pose this to my brother and see what he wants. Thank you.

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An easier way might be:

 

Make the box to fit, as you described and perhaps attach a couple of small

wood strips at the back edge of the box where it meets the wall, and then also attach the strip to the framing around the door or in other spots in the wall. Not too bad.

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12 hours ago, NaturalScience said:

I have a penetrating sealer from doing my basement. I'll definitely use that and additionally get something in between the hardwood and concrete.

A layer of 15# felt will work after ya seal the crete.

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