buz23

Slipper Shell Explosion??

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46 posts in this topic

15 hours ago, buz23 said:

They're invasive in Europe, having come over there with Oysters from here.  They are native to NE.

Aha! When someone said invasive I thought they meant invasive to our waters, like green crabs.

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17 hours ago, buz23 said:

They're invasive in Europe, having come over there with Oysters from here.  They are native to NE.

You're right. Im not sure where i heard they werent native to our waters. But i was certainly wrong. Maybe i heard the were overpopulated in BB.

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10 hours ago, MakoMike said:

Looks good, but those don't look like slipper hells to me. More like snails or periwinkles.

Agreed.  Those aren't slipper shells

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On 10/25/2019 at 11:31 PM, RaritanRedfish said:

Love 'em. We eat them raw. 

They are the greatest things next to a fresh locally harvested oyster or little-neck on a half shell...They're plentiful, delicious, and make for a great appetizer! 

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On 10/26/2019 at 3:05 PM, MakoMike said:

Just curious, do you eat them raw or cooked?

Raw is the best way; I've always harvested from clean and cold and try and keep it to open water exposed gravel areas around SoCo/Lower Bay area when harvesting for myself.  Crack them apart from one another, lift from underneath the suction-cup/muscle, pull upwards and then forward to release the underbelly that is under the fingernail looking structure of its shell and slurp that sucker down. They are hands down one of the tastiest critters around our local water ways. I have grown up as a child eating them with my parents adn can tell you, one must acclimate your stomach to handle these in moderation just like eating any other seafood raw....To many may have you running for the toilet. 

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10 hours ago, SouthCoastSurfFishermen said:

Raw is the best way; I've always harvested from clean and cold and try and keep it to open water exposed gravel areas around SoCo/Lower Bay area when harvesting for myself.  Crack them apart from one another, lift from underneath the suction-cup/muscle, pull upwards and then forward to release the underbelly that is under the fingernail looking structure of its shell and slurp that sucker down. They are hands down one of the tastiest critters around our local water ways. I have grown up as a child eating them with my parents adn can tell you, one must acclimate your stomach to handle these in moderation just like eating any other seafood raw....To many may have you running for the toilet. 

My parents were born in a small fishing town (Molfetta)on the east coast of southern Italy. As such, it's hard to find anything from the sea that we don't eat. I've eaten them since I was a kid and they are a favorite of mine too. Growing up in an Italian community, I remember being surprised to find later that there wasn't a mainstream market for them. Especially in sea side towns.

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There was an article in On The Water earlier this year or maybe last year about eating slipper shells. I think that he said they were tasty but a lot of work for a small amount of meat. 

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1 hour ago, RaritanRedfish said:

My parents were born in a small fishing town (Molfetta)on the east coast of southern Italy. As such, it's hard to find anything from the sea that we don't eat. I've eaten them since I was a kid and they are a favorite of mine too. Growing up in an Italian community, I remember being surprised to find later that there wasn't a mainstream market for them. Especially in sea side towns.

Interesting! I also grew up in a traditional Italian seaside household, and though we ate a lot of creepy crawly things I don't ever recall eating slipper shells.

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On 10/26/2019 at 7:51 PM, bob_G said:

Hey wait, Rob's from England. I'll bet he brought them to our waters.

Well fair's fair......u guys gave us sweet meats so we gave you periwinkles.....Both the snail and flower. Oh, We gave you crabs too!....:b:....The green kind that is!.....:D

 

I checked on the boat price for limpets.....You would need to harvest a truck load to make any money......:(

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11 hours ago, RaritanRedfish said:

My parents were born in a small fishing town (Molfetta)on the east coast of southern Italy. As such, it's hard to find anything from the sea that we don't eat. I've eaten them since I was a kid and they are a favorite of mine too. Growing up in an Italian community, I remember being surprised to find later that there wasn't a mainstream market for them. Especially in sea side towns.

That is awesome! Yeah both of my parents were born and raised in Portugal; father is from St. Miguel (Azores), Mother was born in Lisbon...My sister and I were born here in the U.S., first born generational problems....Anything that comes from the sea must be good and good for you i believe is the motto my parents lived by lol! 

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5 hours ago, SouthCoastSurfFishermen said:

That is awesome! Yeah both of my parents were born and raised in Portugal; father is from St. Miguel (Azores), Mother was born in Lisbon...My sister and I were born here in the U.S., first born generational problems....Anything that comes from the sea must be good and good for you i believe is the motto my parents lived by lol! 

That is a good motto to live by.......

The seaside towns in Britain have fishmonger shops that sell cooked cockles and periwinkles to summer visitors much like fried clams are sold here..  Europeans really love their seafood..... 

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1 hour ago, robc22 said:

That is a good motto to live by.......

The seaside towns in Britain have fishmonger shops that sell cooked cockles and periwinkles to summer visitors much like fried clams are sold here..  Europeans really love their seafood..... 

Americans see people putting cockles and periwinkle in a bucket call them poachers.

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9 mins ago, mikez2 said:

Americans see people putting cockles and periwinkle in a bucket call them poachers.

:lost:

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15 mins ago, robc22 said:

:lost:

Certain people seen near the shore with buckets are immediately labeled as poachers out of hand.

Whether the bucket contains periwinkle, green crabs, silversides, cunner, or in freshwater, the invasive apple snails and crayfish, does not matter.

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In Dublin's fair city
Where the girls are so pretty
I first set my eyes on sweet Molly Malone

As she wheeled her wheelbarrow
Through the streets broad and narrow
Crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"
 
Alive, alive, oh
Alive, alive, oh
Crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"
 
She was a fishmonger
And sure, t'was no wonder
For so were her mother and father before

And they wheeled their barrow
Through the streets broad and narrow
Crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"
 
Alive, alive, oh
Alive, alive, oh
Crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"
 
She died of a fever
And sure, so one could save her
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone

Now her ghost wheels her barrow
Through the streets broad and narrow
Crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"
 
Alive, alive, oh
Alive, alive, oh
Crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"
Alive, alive, oh
Alive, alive, oh
Crying "cockles and mussels, alive, alive, oh"
 
;)
 

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