JohnP

Adobe Lightroom

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I’d love to get feedback on Adobe Lightroom 

 

ive playes with the free iOS version for a while but not sure it’s any better than iPhoto

 

i mainly use a Nikon D7200 with a couple different lenses. Pretty happy with it. I transfer images to an iPad Pro 

 

ive toyed with the idea of going full on Creative Cloud but pretty sure I’d use like 2 % of the features 

 

here’s my deal 

 

right now I’m mainly into wildlife and related action photography 

 

I guess you can say I’m a “ professional photographer” as I regularly sell images to people or publications. But we are not talking big money. I won’t quit my day job 

 

anyway I’m pretty happy with what I shoot and how things come out. I often make minor changes in the iPhoto editor but nothing dramatic. 
 

since I’m shooting action and wildlife I can’t set the shot up. I’ll be out on a boat and a whale will come up or fish will start feeding, anglers will hook up. It’s either shoot or lose it

 

my main reason for better editing might be a section of a boat which comes out over exposed or maybe the body of a fish jumping out out the water is over exposed but the head and tail look great. My eyes saw the image. The camera may have had a slight problem. 

 

I can see Lightroom can help me isolate a portion of the image to correct. 
 

in rare cases some water gets on the lens. In a few cases I have to edit out the background so people don’t know where I was but that’s not so often 
 

otherwise I’ve got no need for wholesale recreation of an image that just wasn’t as it appeared to the eye 

 

anyway Light room can be sold for iOS or apple desktop. I do a lot of work in the field with an iPad Pro and don’t have access to my Mac book for Days sometimes. 
 

any comments regarding your experiences with Lightroom appreciated 

Edited by JohnP

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Lightroom is very useful for organizing your images and simple editing.  I have never used the iPad app but always use it on my desktop. It does have selection features for editing areas of an image but it can get out of hand quickly if you don't know what you're doing.  It's tough to say if it would be useful without seeing example images that were blown out, software can only recover so much of an image.  Usually post-processing is best at recovering underexposed details, but it can get grainy in my experience, that's where overexposing is often better when shooting wildlife/nature.  Can you do a trial on the desktop and see if its really that helpful?  Adobe Photoshop Express on the iPhone (and i think ipad) is pretty solid for quick edits.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

6 mins ago, Wizumz said:

Lightroom is very useful for organizing your images and simple editing.  I have never used the iPad app but always use it on my desktop. It does have selection features for editing areas of an image but it can get out of hand quickly if you don't know what you're doing.  It's tough to say if it would be useful without seeing example images that were blown out, software can only recover so much of an image.  Usually post-processing is best at recovering underexposed details, but it can get grainy in my experience, that's where overexposing is often better when shooting wildlife/nature.  Can you do a trial on the desktop and see if its really that helpful?  Adobe Photoshop Express on the iPhone (and i think ipad) is pretty solid for quick edits.


here’s a quick example 

 

the hull is over exposed but the rest of the shot is fine 


I can edit to get either the hull right or the rest 

 

I saw a demo of Lightroom today. The person doing the demo had a shot with the same problem and snagged the overexposed portion and turned it down 

 

570ACE60-0511-49A9-BCA8-25168D57848F.jpeg

Edited by JohnP

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Posted (edited) · Report post

6 mins ago, JohnP said:


here’s a quick example 

 

the hull is over exposed but the rest of the shot is fine 


I can edit to get either the hull right or the rest 

 

I saw a demo of Lightroom today. The person doing the demo had a shot with the same problem and snagged the overexposed portion and turned it down 

 

570ACE60-0511-49A9-BCA8-25168D57848F.jpeg

Hmm this is an easy edit, you could do this on your iPhone's native Edit feature.  Drop down highlights, won't affect much else in the photo, usually the sky but in your case it won't change much.

 

Download Adobe Photoshop Express, it has most of the same editing features as Lightroom.  The real benefit of Lightroom is organization, quick purging large quantities of photos, and applying quick exports/standard edits.

Edited by Wizumz

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46 mins ago, Wizumz said:

Hmm this is an easy edit, you could do this on your iPhone's native Edit feature.  Drop down highlights, won't affect much else in the photo, usually the sky but in your case it won't change much.

 

Download Adobe Photoshop Express, it has most of the same editing features as Lightroom.  The real benefit of Lightroom is organization, quick purging large quantities of photos, and applying quick exports/standard edits.


As you can see Adjusting the brightness gets the hull color about right, but there goes the color of the ocean. Lol

 

Lightroom is being marketed an an editor more than an organizer 

 

need that feature where you can choose the section to  edit I think 

 

 

2C9DA4C1-7AE4-4FEE-922D-F24D8D367480.jpeg

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Hi John,

 

I use the combination of Lightroom and Photoshop in my photo editing process. Most of the photo adjustments are done in lightroom, only some complicated editing will be done in Photoshop. On top of that, I use some other plug-ins, such as Nik Collection, Topaz, etc for some specific adjustment (mainly for noise control). In reality, all these software and plug-ins can do what you are trying to achieve: localized adjustment.

 

For the specific adjustment you mentioned here, the dial that you wanted to change is the "highlight", not the overall "exposure" or the "brightness". When you bring down the picture highlight, the extreme white area will lose its intensity. If you change the overall exposure or the brightness, you will bring down the entire picture's brightness and cause the problem you are seeing. Most basic photo editing software has the capability of adjusting "highlight" and "Shadow".

 

Hope this helps.

 

Eric

 

 

 

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20 mins ago, SurfGazer said:

Hi John,

 

I use the combination of Lightroom and Photoshop in my photo editing process. Most of the photo adjustments are done in lightroom, only some complicated editing will be done in Photoshop. On top of that, I use some other plug-ins, such as Nik Collection, Topaz, etc for some specific adjustment (mainly for noise control). In reality, all these software and plug-ins can do what you are trying to achieve: localized adjustment.

 

For the specific adjustment you mentioned here, the dial that you wanted to change is the "highlight", not the overall "exposure" or the "brightness". When you bring down the picture highlight, the extreme white area will lose its intensity. If you change the overall exposure or the brightness, you will bring down the entire picture's brightness and cause the problem you are seeing. Most basic photo editing software has the capability of adjusting "highlight" and "Shadow".

 

Hope this helps.

 

Eric

 

 

 


that’s much better 

 

not perfect but better 

 

if I may ask, what do you do in Lightroom vs photoshop ?

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2 hours ago, JohnP said:


As you can see Adjusting the brightness gets the hull color about right, but there goes the color of the ocean. Lol

 

Lightroom is being marketed an an editor more than an organizer 

 

need that feature where you can choose the section to  edit I think 

Not 'brightness,' you want to focus on 'highlights.'  Think of the histogram of the photo, looking at your image it's likely peaky at both ends of the graph.  Dropping the right-most data (highlights) will bring that blown out hull into acceptable range.

1 hour ago, SurfGazer said:

 

For the specific adjustment you mentioned here, the dial that you wanted to change is the "highlight", not the overall "exposure" or the "brightness". When you bring down the picture highlight, the extreme white area will lose its intensity. If you change the overall exposure or the brightness, you will bring down the entire picture's brightness and cause the problem you are seeing. Most basic photo editing software has the capability of adjusting "highlight" and "Shadow".

 

Exactly what Eric said.

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30 mins ago, JohnP said:


that’s much better 

 

not perfect but better 

 

if I may ask, what do you do in Lightroom vs photoshop ?

Hi John,

 

As I mentioned, I use Lightroom as the first step of my entire photo processing, for most of my photo adjustment, probably about 90%. All basic changes such as cropping, exposure adjustment (local and global), highlight/shadow, color saturation, initial de-noise, minor color adjustment, etc. Then the Lightroom adjusted file will be sent to the Photoshop for further noise removal (using plug-in such as Nik Collection's Define, or Topaz's Denoise). If there is some minor edit needed, e.g. to remove a small tree branch in a bird picture, I will usually do it in Photoshop at this step, finally in the Photoshop, the picture will be sharpened and exported to become the final product.

 

For me, I use both software since each is good at some areas (or at least I'm more familiar with certain adjustments in one software) or at least easier doing certain adjustment in a specific software. 

 

I'm attaching your picture that I have adjusted in Lightroom, with the adjustment dials I used in lightroom.

 

Eric

 

 

 

 

 

 

JohnP.jpg

Screen Shot 2019-10-24 at 9.07.57 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-10-24 at 9.08.19 PM.png

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Posted (edited) · Report post

19 mins ago, SurfGazer said:

As I mentioned, I use Lightroom as the first step of my entire photo processing, for most of my photo adjustment, probably about 90%. All basic changes such as cropping, exposure adjustment (local and global), highlight/shadow, color saturation, initial de-noise, minor color adjustment, etc. Then the Lightroom adjusted file will be sent to the Photoshop for further noise removal (using plug-in such as Nik Collection's Define, or Topaz's Denoise). If there is some minor edit needed, e.g. to remove a small tree branch in a bird picture, I will usually do it in Photoshop at this step, finally in the Photoshop, the picture will be sharpened and exported to become the final product.

Hahaha I have the exact same process!  Though I default to Nik Color Efex first :)

Edited by Wizumz

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You could also use the adjustment brush and dial down the highlights or exposure on the boat. Then again I just switched from lightroom to capture one so maybe I'm not the best to ask lol.

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The new version of iPhoto on my desktop Mac has a touch up editor 

the iOS version on my iPad has some great features but not so much.

 

im assuming folks shoot in jpg + raw and this is where Lightroom is at its best?

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If the OP has a way to post the link to dropbox or such so we could download the raw file we could each run the photo through what we all do and post our best result.  I use lightroom and am quite confident I could have that photo looking great in just a few seconds........assuming he is shooting in raw.

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I'll also add that when I shoot I purposely error on the side of shooting with my exposure set so the pictures come out a touch dark.  The sensors on these cameras do a fantasic job of capturing the data if the image is a little too dark.  Its easy to bring up a dark image in post.  If its over-exposed it is considerably more difficult to recover the image as the data is very poor in overexposed areas.

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On 10/31/2019 at 7:45 AM, mako capt said:

Its easy to bring up a dark image in post.  If its over-exposed it is considerably more difficult to recover the image as the data is very poor in overexposed areas.

Generally I do the same and agree with you, UNLESS you're shooting wildlife and the lack of light is pushing your ISO out of your comfort zone (and you don't want to drop shutter or aperture much).  In that case I'll err on the side of overexposure as to not get too much grain (assuming you DON'T want any grain, sometimes grain is good).  I've found sharpening and working with an overexposed wildlife photo produces better end results than an underexposed one.  This almost never applies with landscapes or people... or if you have a low-light-beast like the D500.  But everyone has their own style and intended outcome, and that's what makes this all so much fun!

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