Captain Ahab

To sell or not to sell

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This really is a bizarre thread, to sell or not to sell. We are talking fishing gear, not a car, a house, a bunch of stock. If fishing isn't rewarding to you because you aren't able to catch 50 pounders regularly, maybe the question should've been asked 30 years ago when keeping and killing fish for pictures and mounts was all the rage.

 

Around Long Island waters, there is PLENTY of bait to hold striped bass and bluefish. The overfishing has to stop. Radically, the only real solution is a moratorium on keeping fish, recreationally and commercially, for two years. All bass would be released. 

 

Most fish are mishandled even when released. Kept out too long for pics, dragged through sand and thrown so haphazardly to break spine bones.

 

If you want something to last, you need to take care of it.

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1 hour ago, gln826 said:

 Radically, the only real solution is a moratorium on keeping fish, recreationally and commercially, for two years. All bass would be released.

The problem is release mortality - more than half of the bass we kill annually die after they are released. So being forced to release all of them will increase release mortality greatly. You won’t get a commercial moratorium, they killed less than 10% of the stripers killed last year. Not gonna change anything by shutting them down. The only hope is to make the minimum size big enough that a lot of people will stop fishing for them. Or closed seasons where there is no fishing for striped bass at all. 

 

Thank your ‘recreational’ fishing lobbyists for getting us here and STILL fighting against the regulations that could possibly begin the recovery :th:

 

TimS

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When my job kept me from vacations and fishing, I bought tackle for the "dreams" that went with it.   Hope my imagination does not fail me in retirement.

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Maybe we could box up and ship out politicians from California to the east coast, to balance things out? 

 

That could solve many problems on both sides for US. 

 

Just need some air holes cut, kitty litter, and a few MREs. 

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2 hours ago, cityevader said:

Maybe we could box up and ship out politicians from California to the east coast, to balance things out? 

 

That could solve many problems on both sides for US. 

 

Just need some air holes cut, kitty litter, and a few MREs. 

California instituted MPA's, and the lobbyists, along with at least one well known rag went bats**t. Look how fast their fisheries recovered.  You want to greatly and quickly improve the East Coast Striper Population? - here's my suggestions for closed seasons/MPA's:

  1. The Chesapeake Bay and all its estuaries during the winter spawn, including while the Females are holding in them/migrating into them waiting to spawn.  It is absurd to allow the targeting of roe laden females when the stock is crashing, even if they are holding in the ocean of VA/NC.
  2.  The Hudson River and all its estuaries during the spring spawn, including while the Females are holding in them/migrating into them waiting to spawn. It's laughable that NJ has "closed to striper fishing" estuaries from 1 Jan to 1 march when the bass have not even moved into holding position in the Hudson before late April.  Also, would you like to go to the Toms River in January and see how many "white perch" fisherman are gleefully catching resident bass on barbed J-hooked worms, and then "releasing" them to die in the water?
  3. The Cape Cod Canal all summer long (Yeah, like that will ever happen). Care to look into the survival rate of a released "fought out" 50lb bass when the ambient temp is in the 90's?  How cold/oxygen rich do you think that water actually is?

 

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In the last say 35-40 years when I decided to pick a hobby I made sure it would always pay for itself then some...so when there was extra some I bought ,never taking money out of my main job to fund my hobbies...so everything and anything fishing wise can sit and collect dust even if it has to sit for years and years...it owes me nothing...I'm leaving it all to my son..he'll be a happy boy...if he wants to sell it for a dime on a dollar...it'll be his gain.

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49 mins ago, capesams said:

In the last say 35-40 years when I decided to pick a hobby I made sure it would always pay for itself then some...so when there was extra some I bought ,never taking money out of my main job to fund my hobbies...so everything and anything fishing wise can sit and collect dust even if it has to sit for years and years...it owes me nothing...I'm leaving it all to my son..he'll be a happy boy...if he wants to sell it for a dime on a dollar...it'll be his gain.

Same here I hope I can get my little nephew into the outdoors as much as I've been my entire life. He's gonna have a mountain of gear to deal with when I go!!

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How is release mortality rate even calculated? If half the fish die then when its shoulder to shoulder 6-7 hour blitzes shouldn't i see 100’s of floating fish? Or bass all over the beach washed up the next day? Where do they go 

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20 mins ago, carznfish said:

How is release mortality rate even calculated? If half the fish die then when its shoulder to shoulder 6-7 hour blitzes shouldn't i see 100’s of floating fish? Or bass all over the beach washed up the next day? Where do they go 

I am skeptical of these mortality stats too? 99% of the bass that I release swim away. How does a scientist determine if half of those fish die. Lately, all of my released fish are schoolies which are brought in quickly and released within seconds especially if they are caught on bucktails..... With that said, I do realize that there is a serious problem as big fish from shore are very , very difficult to find. They are gone. There are however lots and lots of small fish. Over the last four seasons finding school bass has been almost a sure thing. Can the fishery be that bad if a dedicated surf fisherman can catch between 500 and over a thousand bass a season? I don't think I'll be selling my Van Staals just yet.

Edited by VanStaalSteve

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Just now, VanStaalSteve said:

I am skeptical of these mortality stats too? 99% of the bass that I release swim away. How does a scientist determine if half of those fish die. Lately, all of my released fish are schoolies which are bought in quickly and released within seconds especially if they are caught on bucktails.

There was a good study done out of Mass some years back. It calculates release mortality at 8 or 9%. I think the number at best is reasonable and at worse too low.

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11 mins ago, Drew C. said:

There was a good study done out of Mass some years back. It calculates release mortality at 8 or 9%. I think the number at best is reasonable and at worse too low.

That makes a little more sense.

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