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Environmentalists have a new target: Charmin toilet paper

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TP today, sanitary napkins tomorrow.

 

 

By Irina Ivanova
Updated on: October 9, 2019 / 3:50 PM / MoneyWatch

Consumer goods giant Procter & Gamble faces pressure from environmentalists to clean up its act.
More than 150 groups are pushing the maker of Charmin toiler paper and Bounty paper towels to use recycled materials in its products. Currently, neither of those products uses recycled paper, and about one-third of it is sourced from Canada's boreal forest — a large swath of virgin forest that rings the Arctic Circle and acts as a critical check on climate change.
"It's just unacceptable that a company like P&G is making toilet paper, a product that is used for seconds and flushed, from virgin pulp," said Shelley Vinyard, boreal corporate campaign manager for the Natural Resources Defense Council and one of several dozen protesters at P&G's annual shareholders meeting in Cincinnati, Ohio, on Tuesday.

The NRDC likens Canada's vast forests to "the Amazon of North." Replacing just half of P&G's virgin pulp usage with recycled content "would dwarf the company's current climate commitments," the NRDC said in a letter to the company that was co-signed by 150 other activist groups.
P&G offers a simple reason for not using recycled wood pulp: It doesn't make for good toilet paper.
"Have you tried recycled toilet paper yourself?" a P&G spokeswoman asked CBS MoneyWatch who also pointed to Charmin as a superior product. "I promise you'll enjoy it much more," she said.

 

P&G is one of the world's largest consumer products companies, with annual revenue of $67 billion and a stock market value of $305 billion. Along with Charmin and Bounty, its many brands include Crest toothpaste, Gillette razors, Head & Shoulders shampoo, Pampers diapers and Tide laundry detergent.
Toilet paper made from recycled fibers doesn't have the same qualities, causing people to use more tissue made directly from trees, the spokeswoman added. She also noted that P&G's experience making recycled tissue products shows that "a significant amount of recycled fibers ends up as solid waste sludge going to landfill."
Instead, P&G promises to source its paper from forests that are well-managed, which in the company's view is a more responsible course of action than using recycled products. About 40% of its product line today comes from forests certified by the Forest Stewardship Council, a nonprofit conservation group, according to the company and the FSC.
36 billion toilet paper rolls per year
"Personally, I buy recycled toilet paper because we can and it's good for the Earth," said Andrew Musgrave, director of Catholic Social Action at the Archdiocese of Cincinnati and one of the 150 signatories to the letter sent to P&G.
Musgrave said he learned about the issue of deforestation for toilet paper relatively recently, through a member of the congregation, and that it was a natural fit with church teachings on preserving the environment. "We believe in the dignity of life, and part of that is having a place to live," he said.
He added that Cincinnati-based P&G had a history of "supporting work and social justice in the community," and he believed it was possible to shift to a recycled paper product without reducing quality.
"Frankly, there are a lot of different companies that have moved in the direction of using recycled paper, and I have a hard time imagining that they would have done it if it were not economically sustainable," Musgrave said.

Making paper sustainably doesn't necessarily mean using 100% recycled content, said Stephen Donofrio, director of the Ecosystem Marketplace initiative at the nonprofit Forest Trends. "It could potentially be a mix. It could be single-source certified and recycled.
Wood has a heavy presence in most U.S. bathrooms — Americans use more tissue paper than any other nation except China, which has more than four times its population. That comes out to 36 billion rolls per year, according to an analysis in Scientific American. The top three companies in what's called the tissue industry — P&G, Kimberly-Clark and Georgia-Pacific — rely almost exclusively on virgin pulp for their products.
Last week, P&G promised to increase the portion of FSC-certified fiber in its products to 75% from the current 40% within six years and to better protect caribou habitat in the Canadian forest where it gets much of its pulp. FSC certification limits forest clear-cutting and ensures trees are re-planted at the same rate they are harvested.
However, even harvesting from a sustainably managed forest has an environmental cost when compared with leaving trees uncut in the first place.
"The question we should be asking is whether or not those products are from virgin primary forests, which are rich with biodiversity, food systems and other ecosystems," Donofrio said. "It's that natural infrastructure that we're trying to avoid being lost. When companies make these pledges to be sustainably sourced or use recycled content, that's the problem that they're solving."

 

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Environmentalists really thought through everything they do, haven’t they. 

 

Lets say Charmin works with a company that utilizes 10k acres of forest to source its pulp. As long as Charmin is buying it, there will be that 10k acres of forest. What happens when Charmin stops buying it and no one else wants to? That forest turns into a Walmart and dollar general with some spiffy condo buildings. Not only are there less trees now, but a bunch of wildlife is displaced. Then the biologists say there needs to be more animals culled from the region to stabilize the habitat, these dbags will drop their Charmin signs and protest the hunters and trappers. Not that anyone would listen to the tree huggers, but let’s say they didn’t laugh at them and didn’t hunt and trap. Then disease will break out and we end up with a destabilized habitat, other species are offset and something becomes extinct. So then these dbags drop their vegan signs and pick up their “save the field mouse” signs and run around with their hair on fire. “We need more protected habitat for these animals to live!”  Well no ****. We tried telling you that when you wanted to protest the toilet paper company. 

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The forest is pine trees. You plant them all in a row and they grow. Cut one down,  plant one, rinse and repeat. They like pine because it’s fibers can be broken down easily. 

 

If they wanted to complain about P&G, they should have mentioned their logo as being satanic.

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You are going to be seeing more and more of this, pressuring corporations to get with the Progressive agenda.

They are getting squeezed in avenues to progress their agenda.

They are losing in the courtrooms, losing at the ballot box, and their regulations are getting ripped from the rule book by the chapter.

Pressuring corps is about all they have left.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

p

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1 min ago, Gotcow? said:

A group so totally full of sh*t complaining about soft TP.

 

I know there's a joke in there somewhere. 

They want us to be like the Arabs...eat with the right, wipe with the left.

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1 hour ago, dena said:

They want us to be like the Arabs...eat with the right, wipe with the left.

-

Better than the OSB plywood posted!

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California has now banned the free, sample-sized bottles of body wash, shampoo, conditioner and lotion provided by many hotels. They are not illegal because, well, plastic.

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1 hour ago, Steve in Mass said:

Never happen......that would be sexist, ya know....... ;)

 

 

Most of the liberal men here wouldny know what to do at the time of the month, now that they changed their genders.

 

 

Serious question.  Why dont the toilet paper whiners just buy a toilet paper that is more to their liking and mind their own business?

 

2) Why dont the toilet paper whiners Manufacture the "prpoer" toilet paper and put it on the shelf to compete with the "bad" toilet paper?

 

3) Do you believe that recycled toilet paper will help change the climate in any way?

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