Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
fishinambition

Loading Bombers with Mercury.

Rate this topic

48 posts in this topic

I read in the main that this is good for heavier reels. It helps maintain balance during the retrieve and gets it deeper. I'm having trouble finding it though. Does VS make mercury?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 mins ago, fishinambition said:

I read in the main that this is good for heavier reels. It helps maintain balance during the retrieve and gets it deeper. I'm having trouble finding it though. Does VS make mercury?

If you mean mercury like in the old thermometers.....?

not sure you can even it get it anymore....extremely toxic/poisonous/will kill you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 mins ago, MarkG said:

not sure you can even it get it anymore....extremely toxic/poisonous/will kill you

 

that's ridiculous.  you shouldn't believe everything you hear on The View 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My neighbor worked at the thermometer factory when I was a kid. She gave her son a jar of mercury and we used to play with it on the front steps and sidewalk. It was impossible to pick up. Good time!! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still in business at the same location I knew.

 

Quote

he original company was established in 1905 under the name of Philadelphia Thermometer Company. Its original founders were F. Stuhl and S. L. Baily Jr. After several owners, the company became wholly owned by Hugo Engelhardt Sr. and J. Leonard. Schwartz Sr. With the retirement of Hugo Engelhardt Sr. and J. Leonard. Schwartz Sr. the company's new owners became Hugo Engelhardt Jr. and John L. Schwartz Jr. starting the second generation of Thermometer manufacturers. The name was changed to Philadelphia Instruments and Controls, Inc. when the company was incorporated in 1995. The third generation of the founding families is now serving as the officers of the corporation, which are Eric G. Engelhardt, President, Robert H. Engelhardt, Treasurer, and John L. Schwartz III, Secretary. Glassblowing skills have been passed down from generation to generation. The company was originally located in Center City Philadelphia and moved to its current location, North Sixth Street, in Philadelphia in 1943.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mercury poisoning 

Mercury and most of its compounds are extremely toxic and must be handled with care; in cases of spills involving mercury (such as from certain thermometers or fluorescent light bulbs), specific cleaning procedures are used to avoid exposure and contain the spill.

Spill it in your house and you got BIG PROBLEMS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

15 mins ago, MikeMc said:

My neighbor worked at the thermometer factory when I was a kid. She gave her son a jar of mercury and we used to play with it on the front steps and sidewalk. It was impossible to pick up. Good time!! 

 

Belmo had a neighbor that worked at the lead paint factory I think 

 

 

trans-fat-paint-chips-who-else-hungry-21391450.png

Edited by RiverRaider
I Hate Belmo More

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do it all the time, I get a bunch of old t-stats from the kid.

Then when I'm done , I paint them with the special paint my grandma got at the clock factory:

 

The Radium Girls were female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning from painting watch dials with self-luminous paint. Painting was done by women at three different sites in the United States, and the term now applies to the women working at the facilities: the first, a United States Radium factory in Orange, New Jersey, beginning around 1917; the facility at Ottawa, Illinois, beginning in the early 1920s; and a third facility in Waterbury, Connecticut.

The women in each facility had been told the paint was harmless, and subsequently ingested deadly amounts of radium after being instructed to "point" their brushes on their lips in order to give them a fine point; some also painted their fingernails, face and teeth with the glowing substance. The women were instructed to point their brushes because using rags, or a water rinse, caused them to waste too much time and waste too much of the material made from powdered radium, gum arabic and water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get my lab grade mercury thru Grainger, make sure to taste to ensure AA quality.

Anyone got a lead on some osmium? I want to pour some bucktails

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.