codfish

Its looking like 1 fish at 35 inches, new rules

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15 hours ago, jps1010 said:

Off hand, I am not sure what their regs are the but I believe they are under 20" which makes 0 sense to me.  Why kill the fish if they haven't even had a chance to breed.  I could be wrong, but wasn't there a moratorium and/or 1@36" in the Chesapeake?

From roughly May through March the only fish left in the Chessie are either males (which rarely get bigger than around 25 inches) and immature females. All of the breeding females are out along the coast somewhere. 

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30 mins ago, MakoMike said:

I was fishing out of Montauk when it went to 1 fish @ 36 inches, we never had problems finding 36 inch fish.

When it went to 38" in NJ for half a season there were 36" fish everywhere. From the rocks and beach. I can only imagine what it would have been like from a boat.

 

TimS

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33 mins ago, MakoMike said:

From roughly May through March the only fish left in the Chessie are either males (which rarely get bigger than around 25 inches) and immature females. All of the breeding females are out along the coast somewhere. 

Conversely, for a couple months a year the majority of the mature striped bass on the East Coast are in the Chessie and need to be protected better than a "trophy" season where the biggest spawning females are targeted while they are gathered and vulnerable for spawning :rolleyes:

 

TimS

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3 hours ago, TimS said:

Conversely, for a couple months a year the majority of the mature striped bass on the East Coast are in the Chessie and need to be protected better than a "trophy" season where the biggest spawning females are targeted while they are gathered and vulnerable for spawning :rolleyes:

 

TimS

With all due respect, I don't believe that is the way the MD "trophy season" works. AFAIK there is no fishing for any striped bass while the fish are on their spawning grounds. The "Trophy season" is supposed to be after the fish are done with the spawn and on their way out of the bay. IIRC there is also a bag limit of one fish per angler for the entire season? NY is much worse, targeting the breeders while they are going up river, in the act of spawning, and going down river. 

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7 hours ago, golden said:

I think the 35" limit is good, but I think a slot system like Maine has or had is better - how about 1 fish @ 20-24" daily and 1 @ 45"+ for trophy catch?

I hated the slot in Maine. 

Suddenly anyone with a walmart zebco or line wrapped around a beer can could get a keeper every single trip. Hoards of fishermen came out of the woodwork. It was a blood bath. 

I'm convinced they wiped out the gene pool of Maine imprinted migrants. The bottom fell out insane fast. Maine fishermen started talking about the decline years before southern New England. 

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On 10/3/2019 at 2:59 PM, MakoMike said:

There are no 35 inch stripers in the Chessie for most of the year.

We were catching 30s back around July/Aug

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23 hours ago, rst3 said:

Allow the use of gillnets to harvest bass.....If ya gonna do it might as well "Git it Dun"!

Gill nets all over the chesapeake, I saw a couple larger ones around the 30s just floating with their gills all flared :( 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Live and learn ??? I GUESS NOT.

 

from the NY Times... March 1990...

 

There is considerable disagreement among biologists and anglers over whether Atlantic coast stocks of Atlantic striped bass have recovered sufficiently to allow more harvesting by sport and commercial interests in the coming season.

Once the most sought-after inshore game fish along the Northeast coast, stripers of Chesapeake Bay origin went into precipitous decline in the early 1970's. Historically, the Chesapeake has accounted for most of the species that wander up and down the coast. Various reasons have been advanced for the striper's plight, among them overfishing by sport and commercial interests, pollution (including acid rain) and unusually low water temperatures during the striper's spawning periods.

Midway in the last decade, fisheries managers took the one option immediately available: severe reduction of the catch.

In 1984, Congress passed the Striped Bass Conservation Act, which required the coastal states from Maine to North Carolina to adopt a striper management plan promulgated by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. The act gives the Federal Government the power to shut down all fishing for the species in states that do not follow the plan.

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In 1985, Maryland went beyond the plan's requirements and imposed a total moratorium on striper fishing. Maryland said its ban would not be lifted until the Chesapeake's striped bass young-of-the-year index reached a three-year running average of 8.

The is index is a measure of relative abundance of juvenile stripers. (The commission's plan called for sharply reduced harvesting and no increase until the running average of 8 was attained.) The index, intended to provide a measure of spawning success, has been computed for 36 years. It involves counting the numbers of juvenile stripers taken - at 22 specific sites in the bay in July, August and September - in 132 haul seine samplings.

The index of 8 is the approximate average over the entire period the samplings have taken place. The highest index, in 1970, was 30. It was below 5 in the 80's save for 1982, when it was 8.4, and last year, when it was 25.2.

A key element in the commission's plan was protecting the females of the relatively abundant 1982 year class with minimum-length limits that crept upward a few inches season after season, the idea being to give those fish a chance to spawn at least once.

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Last year - with some exceptions - the basic recreational limit for coastal-migrating stocks of stripers was one fish a day, 36 or more inches long. Last fall, the 25.2 index figure prompted the commission to announce that it would relax its restrictions in 1990. The recreational limit would remain at one fish a day, but the minimum size would be dropped to 28 inches. Each state would be required to limit its 1990 harvest to 20 percent of its average annual landings from 1972 through 1979.

Some of the striper's champions questioned the 1989 Maryland index. They included Joe Boone, who, until he retired in 1986, ran Maryland's striper sampling program for 27 years. Boone said the '89 sampling was skewed by two abnormally successful seine hauls in the Choptank River. It was a good year, he added, but not good enough to warrant any significant relaxation of regulations.

Boone has not been alone in this view, and a short while ago an article in Sports Illustrated by Robert Boyle questioned the plan to allow more stripers to be caught. Boyle quoted Dr. Ian Fletcher, who is chief scientist at the Great Salt Bay experimental Laboratory in Damariscotta, Me., as having said that the Maryland sampling procedure had always been invalid.

Reached by telephone, Fletcher said, among other things, that he was amazed that the commission's technical committee hadn't made Maryland aware of this. A redesigned and valid sampling procedure, would not, he said, cost any more to operate than the one now in effect. Fletcher is also a professor of oceanography at the State University of New York in Stony Brook and his affidavits on the Hudson River's striped bass helped defeat the Westway project.

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The coastal states have been busy preparing their proposed striper regulations for 1990. The minimum-length limits being contemplated by some of them follow, but it should be understood that all these plans are subject to approval or rejection by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission. The daily recreational limit is always one fish unless otherwise stated.

Massachusetts, which has a significant commercial rod-and-reel fishery for stripers (103,000 pounds were caught in that fishery in 1988), had planned to drop the minimum size to 28 inches. But opposition from sport-fishing interests was so intense that it was decided to leave the size at 36 inches.

Rhode Island will go for the 28-inch minimum.

Bob Jones, chief of Connecticut's Bureau of Natural Resources, said his office would undoubtedly propose a minimum length greater than 28 inches. Connecticut, which for decades has banned the sale of stripers caught in its waters, has no problems associated with commercial fishing for stripers as do Massachusetts and New York state.

In New York State, Gordon Colvin, director of the Division of Marine Resources, said his office's plans were still being formulated. Stocks of Hudson-spawned stripers have been doing very well and account for many of their kind that are caught in the state's waters. It is possible that they could sustain a commercial fishery, but bass of Hudson origin are contaminated by PCB's, some above the level deemed fit for human consumption. Because of this, New York closed commercial fishing for them more than a decade ago.

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New Jersey is proposing a 28-inch minimum for coastal-migrating stripers and a 36-inch minimum for those caught in the Delaware River or Delaware Bay. The state will also submit a plan that would allow coastal anglers to take one additional ''trophy bass'' of 38 inches or more in length each day.

The technical committee of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission meets April 10 to consider the states' proposals.

 
A version of this article appears in print on March 25, 1990, Section 8, Page 4 of the National edition with the headline: Outdoors; Disagreement on Striped Bass.
Edited by nicknotsebastian

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On 10/3/2019 at 7:29 PM, mikez2 said:

You haven't answered. How will stricter regs hurt?

 

You're thinking only in terms of breaking the law. The majority of us are law abiding. If the law says 28", most of us obey. When the law was 36", most of us obeyed.

The result was a drastic, huge, historical recovery. 

 

 

I mean, if I knew anyone at all taking shorts period; I'd be reporting it to local enforcement... Self-policing is also something that needs to be taken a little more seriously especially if certain parties and im even talking about relatives...if you even question someones intentions behind a fishing outing you need to have a serious talk with them like I have with some relatives who have had their eyes opened with just a factually backed conversation and the common sense of just doing the right thing by regulations set in place...  But common now...40 short bass a trip that's plain intentional nonsense that I wouldn't be able to even stand hear about. Id be embarrassed as a bass fishermen to even associate or be a whisper coming for anyone mouth who would do such a thing...

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A lot of the large scale poaching I'm hearing about here is clearly people selling. These are not "rec" fishermen. Somebody somewhere is buying them.

A thriving blackmarket is what it sounds like to me.

Far as I'm concerned, rec/com is too much the grey market already.  Without it, the blackmarket wouldn't exist in large scale.

 

Now watch the guys who whine about the carnage at the canal turn and defend rec/com at the canal.

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Sadly 1 fish at 35" will do little if anything to help restore the stock.  It will just kick the can down the road and it will get worse.  I know it worked in the past, but things are very different now.  Way more people are fishing these days.  The internet has made it very easy for the average joe to succesfully catch quality fish.  And Stripers are not exactly difficult to catch either.  The poaching and general lack of respect for the fish is absolutely out of control.  And it's not just the canal and block.  Unfortunately, 5 years from now I am going to look back at 2019 and wish the fishing was as good as it is today.               

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Posted (edited) · Report post

9 mins ago, frezzy said:

Sadly 1 fish at 35" will do little if anything to help restore the stock.  It will just kick the can down the road and it will get worse.  I know it worked in the past, but things are very different now.  Way more people are fishing these days.  The internet has made it very easy for the average joe to succesfully catch quality fish.  And Stripers are not exactly difficult to catch either.  The poaching and general lack of respect for the fish is absolutely out of control.  And it's not just the canal and block.  Unfortunately, 5 years from now I am going to look back at 2019 and wish the fishing was as good as it is today.               

This makes absolutely no sense. None.

 

All this defeatist attitude is making excuses for the status quo.

 

We can't pass new regs because of poachers? Foolish. Why pass speed limits, nobody follows them? Cops ignore it.

 

The level of poaching as a percentage of the harvest is being blown way out of proportion. Using it as an excuse to avoid painful regs is either foolish or selfish. 

 

Nobody has offered a better suggestion. 

 

 

 

Edited by mikez2

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5 mins ago, mikez2 said:

This makes absolutely no sense. None.

 

All this defeatist attitude is making excuses for the status quo.

 

We can't pass new regs because of poachers? Foolish. Why pass speed limits, nobody follows them? Cops ignore it.

 

The level of poaching as a percentage of the harvest is being blown way out of proportion. Using it as an excuse to avoid painful regs is either foolish or selfish. 

 

Nobody has offered a better suggestion. 

 

 

 

Save this thread and come talk to me in 5 years.  It's going to get a lot worse (unless you enjoy catching schoolies). 

 

Poaching is probem but the real challenge is that particiaption in this sport is at an all time high (and that's ok).  The fishery can no longer support 1 fish of any size being taken by recs on a daily basis though.  Then when you add the comms to the equation it is just not sustainable any longer.

          

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12 mins ago, frezzy said:

 The internet has made it very easy for the average joe to succesfully catch quality fish.  And Stripers are not exactly difficult to catch either.            

This cracks me up.

I assume you are a young guy spoiled recently at the canal. 

 

I got news.

35 inch stripers are not easy to catch, even with the internet. 

The canal thing with the mackerel frenzies will not be reliable all season, every season. 

 

A 35 inch limit addresses the law abiding rec fishermen who honor the recource too much to make a whore out of it. The majority of us. 

The guy who might respectfully legally keep a fish for his own table but would never consider killing them to fund his hobby.

 

Those are the majority of the fishermen out there. Screw the canal, screw Block.

In places where rec/com don't gather, that stuff does not happen. I never, ever see it.

 

If poachers can't sell their fish, they have no incentive to poach large scale. The guy who sneaks a 34" when no one is looking is not the problem. It's the guys selling. That's the law most in need of change. 

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3 mins ago, frezzy said:

Save this thread and come talk to me in 5 years.  It's going to get a lot worse (unless you enjoy catching schoolies). 

 

Poaching is probem but the real challenge is that particiaption in this sport is at an all time high (and that's ok).  The fishery can no longer support 1 fish of any size being taken by recs on a daily basis though.  Then when you add the comms to the equation it is just not sustainable any longer.

          

Talk to me in 5 years if we do nothing. 

I'm willing to bet if they pass 35" it will improve in less than 5 years.

I lived the last set of regs. Heard the charters and party boats predict the end (was the best thing ever happened to the industry). I heard the meat fishermen claim their families would go hungry.

I saw how fast it recovered with my own eyes.  It's not some abstract talking point. That's why it's frustrating to hear so much negativity. 

I really believe it's from commercial interests. 

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