codfish

Its looking like 1 fish at 35 inches, new rules

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A YOY survey of 3.4 is not good at all. Wise resource managers would say we need to protect the fish we have left. Is it all that important that we continue to eat stripers?

 

 

 

 

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I saw the end coming many years ago and haven’t really targeted them since, I’ve had much more fun fishing for other  fish that taste much better and don’t require the time commitment 

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8 hours ago, bob_G said:

A YOY survey of 3.4 is not good at all. Wise resource managers would say we need to protect the fish we have left. Is it all that important that we continue to eat stripers?

 

 

 

 

I concur. 3.4 is a level that should trigger action by the feds. This is detrimental to the sustainability of the fishery. A stock collapse could be imminent if left unchecked.

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11 hours ago, flydog777 said:

I concur. 3.4 is a level that should trigger action by the feds. This is detrimental to the sustainability of the fishery. A stock collapse could be imminent if left unchecked.

But the feds don't manage striped bass, they want nothing to do with them. Striped bass management was purposely handed over to the ASMFC in order to give it something to do.

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On 10/17/2019 at 10:10 AM, MakoMike said:

NJ uses their commercial allocations to give more fish to recreational anglers. There is no commercial fishery allowed in NJ. Different user groups than what they do in NY & MA, but same amount of fish killed. But I will say that I agree that the feds should be managing all of the fisheries. The ASMFC has screwed up every fishery where they have exclusive management authority. For most species it's the MAFMC and NEFMC that keeps the ASMFC in line.

Couldn't agree more. ASMFC's track record is dubious at best. Time for a change, but it sounds like the feds want nothing to do with it.

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On 10/17/2019 at 0:31 AM, flydog777 said:

The best course of action would be the feds to recognize the striper is threatened.

If they ever did that, no one would be allowed to fish for them. And if you got caught fishing for them, for example casting into a breaking school of stripers, the fines would be humongous!

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4 hours ago, MakoMike said:

If they ever did that, no one would be allowed to fish for them. And if you got caught fishing for them, for example casting into a breaking school of stripers, the fines would be humongous!

Who would enforce it? We have ample fishery laws on the books now, all carry substantial fines. Even the most egregious offenses only get a slap on the wrist, and rarely appear in the paper.

I watched people fish without licenses, keep undersize fish, and over their daily limit all summer. Often in broad daylight and in public. Nothing happens.

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1 min ago, bob_G said:

Who would enforce it? We have ample fishery laws on the books now, all carry substantial fines. Even the most egregious offenses only get a slap on the wrist, and rarely appear in the paper.

I watched people fish without licenses, keep undersize fish, and over their daily limit all summer. Often in broad daylight and in public. Nothing happens.

Ditto!

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11 hours ago, MakoMike said:

But the feds don't manage striped bass, they want nothing to do with them. Striped bass management was purposely handed over to the ASMFC in order to give it something to do.

If they recognize the striper as a threatened species from overfishing. They certainly will. That is why the feds have management and enforcement of the endangered species act. Give me an example of when the ASMFC did anything to ensure sustainability of the striper? Beyond no gaff and circle hooks?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On 10/10/2019 at 11:22 AM, MakoMike said:

Very few Hudson river fish migrate past the tip of Long Island, which is why I said "almost" all of the fish you catch are females.

You still foisting this falsehood?  I've caught 2 Hudson River Foundation tagged fish in the past 3 years in Maine.  If "very few" Hudson River fish leave LI, I must be one lucky SOB.

 

But wait, there are a bunch of us lucky SOBs not on LI as this return map from HRF shows.  And yes, those inland returns are probably folks who just used their mail addresses for the catch location.

 

tag-locations-2001-2017-1.jpg

Edited by Roccus7

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1 hour ago, bob_G said:

Who would enforce it? We have ample fishery laws on the books now, all carry substantial fines. Even the most egregious offenses only get a slap on the wrist, and rarely appear in the paper.

I watched people fish without licenses, keep undersize fish, and over their daily limit all summer. Often in broad daylight and in public. Nothing happens.

Whole different ball game Bob. How many times do see the blurbs in the paper when someone kills an eagle or a wolf? An endangered listing would change the whole regime.

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1 min ago, MakoMike said:

Whole different ball game Bob. How many times do see the blurbs in the paper when someone kills an eagle or a wolf? An endangered listing would change the whole regime.

I completely understand the ramifications. But the fishery managers won't even consider giving stripers game fish status,  let alone declaring them threatened or endangered. 

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2 mins ago, bob_G said:

I completely understand the ramifications. But the fishery managers won't even consider giving stripers game fish status,  let alone declaring them threatened or endangered. 

Gotcha! But an endangered species listing isn’t up to the fishery management people. There is a whole different bureaucracy for that.

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10 hours ago, bob_G said:

I completely understand the ramifications. But the fishery managers won't even consider giving stripers game fish status,  let alone declaring them threatened or endangered. 

That’s because they are neither threatened or endangered. They have been overfished. Get a grip, give the regulations a few years and the less than average fishermen will be catching keepers in places other than the canal by 2025.

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, giggyfish said:

That’s because they are neither threatened or endangered. They have been overfished. Get a grip, give the regulations a few years and the less than average fishermen will be catching keepers in places other than the canal by 2025.

 

Get a grip por favor?  We've already been down this road before. The last time it took the better part of a decade before it recovered. Now we're all supposed to tighten our belts, and do it all over again.

Why? Because our fishery managers didn't have the foresight to see this trend coming, we happily do it all over again. What do we do in the meantime, play frisbee golf?  More and more I feel like it might be time to move on.

Edited by bob_G

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