CrappieAttitude

Headed to the Outer Banks

Rate this topic

46 posts in this topic

14 hours ago, CrappieAttitude said:

Thanks for all the feedback - looks like a rainy and windy week.  Guess we will just need to suck it up and deal with the weather.

Yup, today pretty much looks like the best day of the week...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

looks like wind might not be so bad in the am tomorrow .....if I had the day free id be on a pier at 6am hoping the pressure drop sparks a good bite as the wind switches....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, bronson said:

looks like wind might not be so bad in the am tomorrow .....if I had the day free id be on a pier at 6am hoping the pressure drop sparks a good bite as the wind switches....

Unfortunately we won’t arrive till mid-afternoon on Tuesday 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the Windfinder app, the weekend and early week should be better.  Unfortunately for you, 10/15 looks to be the best of the forecast.

 

If it makes you feel any better, the night of 10/16 and next day or two, are 30+ mph winds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I'm heading down on the 17th. I don't trust a forecast this far out, Last year around this time was a nor'easter with 30mph sustained winds on one of the days/nights the rest of the weekend was 15+

 Left the kayak at home but the beach was still doable except the 30mph day.

 I'll make a decision on taking the yak Wednesday night.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No doubt on long term forecast.  But for about a week out, that app is usually pretty accurate.  3-4 days out, it has been spot on for me and much more reliable on wind than any of the weather apps that I use.  I think it was someone on this site, possibly NJ forum, that I found out about it.  Nothing is going to be 100% for long term predicting, especially OBX, but nice to have some sort of tool for planning.  When at the beach for vacation, I use to give an idea if I should wake up at 5AM to fish the front, take a ride to the back, or sleep in.  Helps me decide which days to burn a vacation day to take the boat out locally, that I won't be fighting the wind.  If I have plans and reservations, whether with the family for a week or friends fishing for an extended weekend, the wind doesn't matter.  I am going regardless, unless a major storm has me in the cross hairs.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well according to that app.. next Friday and Saturday is starting to look good. No turning back now I’ll make the best of whatever happens. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to reports (at least on Hatteras Island), people are still catching fish in the high winds.  Fish reports on both front and back.  There always seems to be a place to hide from the wind a bit (maybe not always).  I'm sure you all will have good trips.  Great time to be fishing down there.  Hope you all do well and share your reports.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saw this in the Charlotte Observer: Outer Banks threatened as two storms merge to create coastal flooding, dangerous seas

 

Here is most of it: 

Two storms off the East Coast are combining in the Mid-Atlantic to create dangerous conditions on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, the National Hurricane Center said.

It gets worse, too.

Once the systems merge, the resulting storm will “stall off the East Coast,” stretching the predicted hazards out for days, according to the National Weather Service.

“While the storm system will not bring much rain to the coastline, it will, however, create some dangerous seas and hazardous beach conditions along with it,” NWS forecasters said.

“Large dangerous seas in excess of 10 feet will occur off the NC coast through late week.”

Parts of the Outer Banks should expect “beach erosion, dangerous rip currents and ocean overwash around the times of high tide,” forecasters said.

Flooding is most likely on the Pamlico Sound side of the islands, including southern Hatteras and Ocracoke islands, the Downeast area in Carteret County and communities along the lower Neuse River, the NWS said.

“All coastal impacts will likely be prolonged for several days... with roadways and properties north of Cape Hatteras adjacent to the beach experiencing inundation for several high tide cycles in a row,” the NWS tweeted.

The first photos of sea water pouring over dunes and across N.C. Highway 12 on the Outer Banks were posted on Facebook about 8:30 a.m. Thursday. Standing water was reported on the highway, which is the main road linking the barrier islands.

National Park Service officials have already begun warning motorists and campers at the national seashores on Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout to “exercise caution.”

“A developing coastal low will make things unsafe for swimmers and a little chancy for vehicles,” posted Cape Lookout National Seashore.

Many coastal communities have put up red flags on their beaches, indicating dangerous rip currents are likely in the ocean. Such currents are frequently blamed for drownings off the Carolinas.

 

 

 

noaa.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The above photographs are from the notorious S-curves at the north end of Rodanthe.  This area commonly washes out with big storms, hence the state's construction of a "jug handle" bridge to bypass this area entirely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.