flyfshr60

2000 Toyota 4 Runner

13 posts in this topic

I'm considering buying a 2000 Toyota 4Runner to use as a beach vehicle next year.  It is in very good condition even with 180K miles on it.  I know the timing belt was done at around 120k .  Are there any other issues (other than normal wear and tear ) that I should be on the lookout for. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 mins ago, Ba Ba Buoy said:

Frame rot

 

 

Another vote for frame rot. 

Had the frame fixed on mine once when my son was driving it. He got another vehicle and let that sit in front of his mom's til they were going to tow it. Brought back to my house and was going to put it up for sale. My neighbor saw and bought it off me. 

Noticed it sitting and saw him driving a car one day. Told me he had the frame fixed twice and it needed more fixing. He won't even drive it. 

 

It still runs great with 235,000 mile on it, though. :laugh: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you guys.  I never realized the earlier models had a problem with frame rot .. l am going to have my mechanic look for it when he goes through it ... I'll report back. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, flyfshr60 said:

Thank you guys.  I never realized the earlier models had a problem with frame rot .. l am going to have my mechanic look for it when he goes through it ... I'll report back. 

I'm by no means a mechanic, or inclined in that regard, but I think frame rot is a general old car issue.  Obviously more prevalent in the North East with our winters and salt-laden roads... wouldn't want something deteriorating underneath you as your hitting bumps and cruising at 60mph+

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Wizumz said:

I'm by no means a mechanic, or inclined in that regard, but I think frame rot is a general old car issue.  Obviously more prevalent in the North East with our winters and salt-laden roads... wouldn't want something deteriorating underneath you as your hitting bumps and cruising at 60mph+

Agreed, any car pushing 20 years old needs to be check for frame rot. I got an 02 4runner with almost no rust besides some surface stuff, looked at 4 others that were rough before I found it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 2000 had terrible frame rot.  Its catalytic converter was a giant PITA, too.  They can be difficult to diagnose (search "Code P0420" on the web or ask Bob G.).  Because all Toyotas of that vintage were 50 state compatible, 4Runners like Toyota cats better than aftermarket cats and the Toyota cats run $2,000 a pop.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frame rot, lower ball joints, rear springs sag, rear bumper rusts but for the most part very reliable vehicle. I have a 2000 with 135k on it and it seems brand new.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, tbyrne said:

My 2000 had terrible frame rot.  Its catalytic converter was a giant PITA, too.  They can be difficult to diagnose (search "Code P0420" on the web or ask Bob G.).  Because all Toyotas of that vintage were 50 state compatible, 4Runners like Toyota cats better than aftermarket cats and the Toyota cats run $2,000 a pop.

 

 

Not so true about aftermarket cats. Cat converters have a finite life,the better you maintain your vehicle,the longer the cat will last. Continuing to operate vehicle when not running properly takes miles off the cat. 

PO420 code is not difficult to diagnose. Toyota cats cost what they do due to their pricing structure and the fact they have to meet oe level quality emission standards testing for 100k plus miles. 

My Tacoma had check light wink on and off occasionally at 168k miles,PO420 code,catalyst efficiency. Tested O2 sensors and cat temps and exhaust temps before and after cat. Cat was wearing out,the 420 code stored comes from the rear sensor monitoring how well cat is cleaning things up and bumps the light when thresholds aren't met. Many people start swapping O2 sensors in an attempt to cure the 420 code. While O2 sensors get less sensitive and slower as they age,they won't cause the 420 code. The front O2 should be replaced periodically@60-70k as fuel mileage begins to drop perceptively around this mileage. 

I replaced the cat on my Tacoma 8 years ago with a Magnaflow heavy metal converter. It has passed emissions testing easily every 2 years since.

 

 It is not necessary to replace your cat with the Toyota factory one. I paid $140.00 for the one on my truck,certain it'll last 150k easily. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am hopeful for this one on the frame rot front.  The car was 100% garage kept and used very lightly in the early years.  I'm hoping whatever rot is there will be repairable.   I will have access to the truck next week so I will report back.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lost my 2004 (4th generation) 4runner to frame rot, having paid the dealer to rust proof it - ends up they "ghost-sprayed" it. 

I brought my 5th generation (2016) to same place that rust-proofed my 1989 Jeep Cherokee, which I traded in after 15yrs with 65K almost exclusively beach miles on it and not one bit of undercarriage rust.  He did my 2016, which I bought Dec 2015, in Feb. 2016 - truck spent the time in between in the garage, so it was virgin when he did it with the Ziebart product.  Note that I removed all the skid plates, mud guards, fender plastic pieces underneath the truck and the "cowling" between the grill and the radiator, so that he had full access to the entire undercarriage and engine compartment. I made sure he sprayed the inside of all the frame sections thru the drain holes and the bottom of the running boards, and he clear sprayed the engine compartment and the area between the grill and the radiator frame..

I did all the skid plates myself with rustoleum 2-part epoxy truck bed liner, since the 9.5ft of ground clearance acts like a big sand scoop on the beach. I also reinstalled them with stainless 8mm bolts heavily coated with aluminum-based anti-seize to prevent galvanic corrosion of the tapped bolt holes. In addition, I added poly spacers and longer bolts to the back of the rear engine skid plate to alleviate sand build up underneath the transmission, which will overheat it.  I also leave off the bolt-on access plate on this skid plate, again to alleviate sand build-up under the transmission. Another thing I do is I remove the two engine skid plates before every 5k service and blow the sand out of the engine and transmission cross members, as well as touching up the truck bed liner, as required. 

After every trip to the beach, I blow the sand off the top of the engine skid plates with a home-made 5 ft long bendable blow gun, and rinse the entire truck, including the undercarriage, with a wand from West Marine (see picture).

I put the 4 Runner up on the lift and inspected for rust in Feb 2019 (after 3+ years and 15K miles) and only found "staining" of the stock fastener heads - so far, my prevention/maintenance plan is working.  

West Marine Spray Wand.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

On 9/23/2019 at 3:11 PM, tbyrne said:

My 2000 had terrible frame rot.  Its catalytic converter was a giant PITA, too.  They can be difficult to diagnose (search "Code P0420" on the web or ask Bob G.).  Because all Toyotas of that vintage were 50 state compatible, 4Runners like Toyota cats better than aftermarket cats and the Toyota cats run $2,000 a pop.

 

 

The imfamous 420 code on Toyotas is almost always associated with the downstream air/fuel ratio sensor and rarely the cat.  Be sure to change o2 sensors with OEM sensors like Denso.  Toyotas do not get along well with aftermarket electrical parts.

 

In regards to the 2000s 4Runners, the most common problems i've encountered are frame rot as mentioned, gas tank & skid plate rot, and EVAP code issues associated with the charcoal canister.  Suspension parts could be a concern but expected with an older vehicle.  My sequoia has around 230K with original suspension parts.

Edited by DEM Parking Lot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.