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Goudacuda

beginner fly setup

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really want to get into fly fishing and was looking around online for a good setup for my first fly rod and reel, I came across the Lamson guru II 3.5 and the tfo nxt in the 9 weight. I was wondering if that is good and if there are any other reels or rods to look into before I make a purchase. thanks. 

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I’d say that’s just a fine place to start. Both of those companies have tremendous warranties (I think thirty bucks will get you a replacement on both brands regardless of how badly you screw up) and you’ll quickly find that a good warranty is worth its weight in gold whenever you do need it. 

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Assume your looking to fish primarily for stripers (and like sized fish)?  If so, that is a good set-up. If you want a "all round rod" that will double for freshwater bass , trout etc, you might want something lighter. It's hard to get one rod to do it all.

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1 min ago, WeeHooker said:

Assume your looking to fish primarily for stripers (and like sized fish)?  If so, that is a good set-up. If you want a "all round rod" that will double for freshwater bass , trout etc, you might want something lighter. It's hard to get one rod to do it all.

yes I'm gonna be in saltwater 95% of the time chasing stripers and blues. 

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TFO and Lamson both make good stuff.  I'm not sure about Lamson's warranty, but TFO is great.  I know I broke my Lamson Liquid and they offered me a new one at 30 or 35% off (which was nice, as the breakage was totally my fault).

 

If you're looking for a medium action rod, the TFO Professional II is great, I think it runs around $ 150 or so.  I've never used the NXT so I can't comment on that.  

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I have that exact set up. I'm somewhat of a beginner to fly fishing the salt, but have decent experience in the past fly fishing freshwater. I like the guru a lot, quality made reel. Rod casts well too as a I get used to turning over heavier flies and lines. I will say I think there are some less expensive options out there for you though unless price is not an issue.

 

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If you want a world-class fly rod:

I donated 10 fly rods suitable for Striper fishing to Casting For Recovery.  They plan to auction them off sometime in November.  They are the left-overs of the rods that I offered for sale as a Fund Raiser for SOL.

PM me if you wish to be notified of the details.

If you are not familiar with the charity - google Casting for Recovery.

Regards,

Herb

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Worth it to spend a little more on the rod, IMO.  The TFO Pro II is good for only a bit more.  If you are fishing mostly locally I'd also suggest looking at a two piece rod.  The TFO TFR (Tough Fly Rod) in 8wt is in reality an 8/9w same as the NXT 8/9 but it is a better rod.  Check TFO's website to compare them.  Very powerful and a better casting rod than the NXT.  Then again if you can wait to bid for one of HL's rods you would likely get a world class rod for a decent bargain.

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8 hours ago, surfcityNJ said:

I have that exact set up. I'm somewhat of a beginner to fly fishing the salt, but have decent experience in the past fly fishing freshwater. I like the guru a lot, quality made reel. Rod casts well too as a I get used to turning over heavier flies and lines. I will say I think there are some less expensive options out there for you though unless price is not an issue.

 

what are some of those less expensive options

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4 hours ago, Killiefish said:

Worth it to spend a little more on the rod, IMO.  The TFO Pro II is good for only a bit more.  If you are fishing mostly locally I'd also suggest looking at a two piece rod.  The TFO TFR (Tough Fly Rod) in 8wt is in reality an 8/9w same as the NXT 8/9 but it is a better rod.  Check TFO's website to compare them.  Very powerful and a better casting rod than the NXT.  Then again if you can wait to bid for one of HL's rods you would likely get a world class rod for a decent bargain.

thanks, definitely gonna take a look at the tfr 

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1 hour ago, Goudacuda said:

thanks, definitely gonna take a look at the tfr 

Also, the Lamson Guru II is a great match for that rod (size 3.5 is an 8/9 reel).  Make sure you follow the provided guidelines to maintain it and it will hold up well.  Skip on maintenance and it won't.  Don't let salt water get inside the drag.  It's not completely sealed if you dunk it or remove the spool while in use.

 

Here are TFO's own ratings for presentation, distance and lifting power, respectively, for the following rod series.

 

TFO NXT - 5, 5, 2   

TFO pro II - 5, 5, 2

TFO TFR - 5, 5, 5

TFO Mangove - 5, 5, 5

TFO BVK - 6, 5, 1

 

The Mangrove is 4 piece and is a more expensive rod than any of the others.  Great rod if you want to spend more $ for a four piece rod.  The TFO Mangrove in 8w or 9w was highly regarded by of one member here who was very well respected who passed recently.  His name was Dick Perry (aka Bonefish Dick).  The TFR is a great all around saltwater rod, if you can deal with a 2 piece (not a great air travel rod).  If you can, test cast a bunch of rods and make sure to include the Mangrove in 9wt vs. the TFR in 8w. 

 

Note that the TFO BVK in 8 or 9wt has been reported to have breakage issues (because of the thin tip relative to rest of the blank, and maybe user error particularly if the rod is high sticked or used for heavy lifting).  The Mangrove is also a better rod than the BVK in my opinion.  I sold my 8wt BVK and purchased a TFR for local use.  Very pleased with it so far.  My use for it includes but is not limited to fishing off of rocks and jetties, or similar situations where heavy lifting may be useful but casting qualities are still good to excellent.

 

Another company to check out is Echo.  The Echo Base series gets good reviews here and the Echo Ion XL in 8wt is a very decent rod, if a bit heavy.  Echo rods tend to be tough as nails and their warranty is as good as TFO's.  YMMV.

 

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Hi guys, I am new to the game myself and I have that same Guru reel on a 7wt throwing an 8wt line as recommended by my local shop. This was my second setup that I was able to add to the arsenal for targeting small blues and hickory shad in the bays and estuaries and from the kayak, and it has been a hoot. I also have a 9wt that was my first setup and I'll admit that the first time I caught a moderately sized schoolie say 20" in the actual surf (ocean/sand beach with 2-3' waves, working a small closer in a rip), I felt completely under-gunned compared to my lightweight surfcasting setup. A 10wt might be in your near future if you frequent sand bars / the surf?

 

I'm curious to hear what the knowledgeable folks say about a recommended first line for the OP on his likely setup? I discovered different line styles can change your cast quite a bit, thx!

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I'd definitely consider looking at the buy sell here for used options. Might find the same or similar set up for the same or less money. I was very close to pulling the trigger on the Echo Bravo reel. Little less money, but looks like a good reel with good reviews. I'm not an expert but I was trying not to spend a lot as I know I will likely still fish spin more often. I'm happy with my set up though. I've never been the type of person who is happy with cheap options, I screw up enough, I don't want my gear failure to be a reason for losing more fish.

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12 hours ago, dkanoafry said:

Hi guys, I am new to the game myself and I have that same Guru reel on a 7wt throwing an 8wt line as recommended by my local shop. This was my second setup that I was able to add to the arsenal for targeting small blues and hickory shad in the bays and estuaries and from the kayak, and it has been a hoot. I also have a 9wt that was my first setup and I'll admit that the first time I caught a moderately sized schoolie say 20" in the actual surf (ocean/sand beach with 2-3' waves, working a small closer in a rip), I felt completely under-gunned compared to my lightweight surfcasting setup. A 10wt might be in your near future if you frequent sand bars / the surf?

 

I'm curious to hear what the knowledgeable folks say about a recommended first line for the OP on his likely setup? I discovered different line styles can change your cast quite a bit, thx!

Dk

 

When you get used to fly rods you will learn how to extract the power they posses low down by using a low rod angle when fighting a fish.

 

20 inch fish you can comfortably fight with a 6 wt.

 

No one line can cover all bases. If OP is mainly fishing fairly shallow water then a floating line is easier to cast when starting out as it is easier to lift off the water. Ideally if we wish to cover most bases it’s a floater, Intermediate and fast sink.

 

If could only have one line then my choice would be an Intermediate Line for NE Coast Stripers.  

But you need to know how to unplug a sunk line and be able to have a reasonable cast to enjoy one.

 

Nothing comes for free.

 

mike

 

 

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7 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

Dk

 

When you get used to fly rods you will learn how to extract the power they posses low down by using a low rod angle when fighting a fish.

 

20 inch fish you can comfortably fight with a 6 wt.

 

No one line can cover all bases. If OP is mainly fishing fairly shallow water then a floating line is easier to cast when starting out as it is easier to lift off the water. Ideally if we wish to cover most bases it’s a floater, Intermediate and fast sink.

 

If could only have one line then my choice would be an Intermediate Line for NE Coast Stripers.  

But you need to know how to unplug a sunk line and be able to have a reasonable cast to enjoy one.

 

Nothing comes for free.

 

mike

 

 

Good advice!  I'd add that one of the temporary band-aids that can be used with a floating (or intermediate line) is to buy / make a sinking leader kit. ( Cortland sells them but it's not hard to make your own.)  Namely a 3-6' section of LC-13 /fast sinking line, looped between the end of a floating/Intermediate fly line and your leader can make an instant sink tip without benifit of an extra spool and /or line. . The rig will cast a little clunky, and you'll lose distance  but such a set up has saved me more than once when fishing the surf/rocks . If you only have one line, it's worth packing one of these kits along.

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