Jammin81

Best knot for 60lbs mono leader?

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palomar knot...no doubt....palomar the swivel that starts the leader first.....use needlenose pliers and wet the mono to help set the knot...then pull the swivel from a nail on your workbench with one hand while pulling the tag with the pliers with the other....trust me the knot will lock....then clip the tag and again pull the leader line against the nail to ensure the knot is all set....repeat the same for the other end of the leader (i.e. tact angler clip or fish hook...etc...) same thing use pliers/water/nail pull to make sure the full leader is now all set...finally loop the leader through the final palomar knot on your main braided line...your line/swivel/hook/clip will fail before the not....it's a lot of work..but if you want to make sure you land those fish (i bridge fish so the stress is unreal) its the safest bet...

the 3 loop uni will slip...do not listen to that advice....good luck...

 

 

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I don't wish to enter a contestant, because crimps hold better anyways. LOL

 

I would like to mention a few things if I may.

 

Wetting the line. I read all about how it prevents the material from burning during the tightening process. Always doubted that the material burned significantly, so often times skipped licking my knots. Later on I realized something important and started licking knots again. It was that lube allows the knot to cinch up more completely, and that is why we should lick our knots.

 

Let us face it, most any of our knots will hold fine. People mention 100% knots and I always wondered about that. I have tested many different knots and the line always seems to break somewhere above the knot. Does that mean all of them are 125% knots ?

 

It really isn't which knot you are using, it is all about how well you tie that knot. Any poorly formed triple Lancaster with a hypotenuse finish will fail faster than a dumb old nail knot tied very well, and by someone that knows how. Many knots are very susceptible to slight deviancies, and can slip and fail for seemingly minor issues. I switch knots when I am trying to accomplish something. Choosing a particular knot based solely on its application. Sometimes I want a constricting knot, sometimes a loop, sometimes it is that I want the tag end facing backwards. They all seem to work pretty well, but only when formed just so.

 

I like to have a third hand available to me. I use a metal wire shaped into a shepherds hook, attached to my bench. This allows me to use that third hand to hold something still and that frees up both of my hands to do the forming. I also like to tighten down most all of my knots in a particular fashion. That is apply some pull to the main line, and using pliers on the tag end, and draw the knot together carefully, watching the whole time. Then a test pull to ensure I haven't flubbed something. I do not pull on it like I am mad at it either. Just a good test and done, leaving the fish to stress it if it gets stressed at all.

 

Buying fresh materials from big retailers that actually move their stock, and then storing them in a cool and dark place until needed is also something that I feel helps me with my knottings. Also, if I can utilize a tool to form the knot, I find that is also an advantage, and own several varieties and even invented one myself. Tools can help you achieve reliable and easily repeatable knottings.

 

Well thanks, it is always fun to enter into a knotting thread. Maybe next time I will enter an actual knot into the discussion. Like maybe a Double Davey, or a King Sling Loop knot, but for sixty pound test to a clip, short crimp the whole way.

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On 14/09/2019 at 7:06 AM, FishinMortician said:

I don't wish to enter a contestant, because crimps hold better anyways. LOL

 

I would like to mention a few things if I may.

 

Wetting the line. I read all about how it prevents the material from burning during the tightening process. Always doubted that the material burned significantly, so often times skipped licking my knots. Later on I realized something important and started licking knots again. It was that lube allows the knot to cinch up more completely, and that is why we should lick our knots.

 

Let us face it, most any of our knots will hold fine. People mention 100% knots and I always wondered about that. I have tested many different knots and the line always seems to break somewhere above the knot. Does that mean all of them are 125% knots ?

 

It really isn't which knot you are using, it is all about how well you tie that knot. Any poorly formed triple Lancaster with a hypotenuse finish will fail faster than a dumb old nail knot tied very well, and by someone that knows how. Many knots are very susceptible to slight deviancies, and can slip and fail for seemingly minor issues. I switch knots when I am trying to accomplish something. Choosing a particular knot based solely on its application. Sometimes I want a constricting knot, sometimes a loop, sometimes it is that I want the tag end facing backwards. They all seem to work pretty well, but only when formed just so.

 

I like to have a third hand available to me. I use a metal wire shaped into a shepherds hook, attached to my bench. This allows me to use that third hand to hold something still and that frees up both of my hands to do the forming. I also like to tighten down most all of my knots in a particular fashion. That is apply some pull to the main line, and using pliers on the tag end, and draw the knot together carefully, watching the whole time. Then a test pull to ensure I haven't flubbed something. I do not pull on it like I am mad at it either. Just a good test and done, leaving the fish to stress it if it gets stressed at all.

 

Buying fresh materials from big retailers that actually move their stock, and then storing them in a cool and dark place until needed is also something that I feel helps me with my knottings. Also, if I can utilize a tool to form the knot, I find that is also an advantage, and own several varieties and even invented one myself. Tools can help you achieve reliable and easily repeatable knottings.

 

Well thanks, it is always fun to enter into a knotting thread. Maybe next time I will enter an actual knot into the discussion. Like maybe a Double Davey, or a King Sling Loop knot, but for sixty pound test to a clip, short crimp the whole way.

Exactly ^ I always think about the knot tests and myself fall victim to the 100% knot stuff. A well tied knot rarely fails and that’s why we have drags on the reel! 

 

Combine that hat with the cushion and bend of the rod most knots will hold. 

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Tie the knot you're most proficient at.  The key is ensuring it is fully tightened without abrading the line. Most knot failures are due to slippage, not actual breaking.  Tightening can be more difficult with heavier mono, especially with the Palomar, Improved Clinch or Trilene.  Pliers and/or gloves (along with some spit) help, but you'll often pigtail the end of your leader when tightening.  That's the advantage of the Uni.  I prefer the San Diego Jam Knot, which is a version of the Uni, from 30 lb up to about 80 lb test.  Bigger than that, I crimp.  Smaller than that, the Trilene knot is my go to.   

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