planter

Basic gear for tuna and swords?

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I've been given TWO overnight trips on different head end boats and am just curious what I can get for a pretty low budget? What the minimum conventional set up should i get that isnt junk.

I've been told since there are a lot of guys on the boat mono is preferred over braid because the braid cuts off tight mono so easily and i guess I'm alright with that. I've also been told 100 pound mono is the way to go so i will but how much of it is still a question.

If you were going to buy a conventional rod and reel for the canyons and didn't happen to be rolling in the Benjamins what would you purchase?

Thanks.

 

Edited by planter

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There's certain things you need to understand when blue water fishing.

One is it's not cheap and two it's not relaxing. What I can promise

you is that you're going to pay for it, work very hard at it and you're

going to have a spectacular time. You're going to have fun. You need

to be prepared. Now that being understood. My recommendation to

you would be a 50 wide spooled with 80 pound momoi diamond and

either a calstar or seeker rod. You now have this for the rest of your life

and saved yourself a lot of money. :)

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You don't need to spend SandSpike's money, if you're on the East Coast.  California is different.

 

Most of my tuna have come on a Daiwa 900H loaded with 400 yards of 80 lb. The rod was a Sabre Stroker. Last year the Viking boats at Montauk didn't see a single tuna over 100 lbs. I have talked to one guy, a Viking tuna regular, who was spooled on an 80W with 100 lb. mono, but it's very, very unlikely. It becomes less likely as the tuna population declines.

 

I think 95% of East Coast partyboat tuna would be effectively caught on a 6/0 with 60 lb., for that matter.

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True.

 

But after many, many, many offshore trips, either working on the boat, fishing the east coast tournament circuit, or just fishing for fun, I have found the big fish of the trip WILL ALWAYS seek out and crush the lightest rig in the water.

 

While the YFT fishing is not what it was, there are still plenty of bigeyes around, and nothing is worse than losing a good fish because you brought a knife to a gunfight.  And I say this as someone that tends to fish light.

 

Call it Murphys law.

 

Swords are a whole 'nother animal and fight like they are possessed by demons

 

I'm inclined to agree with sandspike.  Particularly if you think its something you will be doing regularly.

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9 hours ago, makorider said:

True.

 

But after many, many, many offshore trips, either working on the boat, fishing the east coast tournament circuit, or just fishing for fun, I have found the big fish of the trip WILL ALWAYS seek out and crush the lightest rig in the water.

 

While the YFT fishing is not what it was, there are still plenty of bigeyes around, and nothing is worse than losing a good fish because you brought a knife to a gunfight.  And I say this as someone that tends to fish light.

 

Call it Murphys law.

 

Swords are a whole 'nother animal and fight like they are possessed by demons

 

I'm inclined to agree with sandspike.  Particularly if you think its something you will be doing regularly.

This^^

And DO NOT forget a belt!

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10 hours ago, makorider said:

True.

 

But after many, many, many offshore trips, either working on the boat, fishing the east coast tournament circuit, or just fishing for fun, I have found the big fish of the trip WILL ALWAYS seek out and crush the lightest rig in the water.

 

While the YFT fishing is not what it was, there are still plenty of bigeyes around, and nothing is worse than losing a good fish because you brought a knife to a gunfight.  And I say this as someone that tends to fish light.

 

Call it Murphys law.

 

Swords are a whole 'nother animal and fight like they are possessed by demons

 

I'm inclined to agree with sandspike.  Particularly if you think its something you will be doing regularly.

That reminds me .... the best Viking fish I saw was a sword, on a tuna trip. The angler was a mate from a Sheepshead party boat, young and well muscled. He had a 9/0 Senator, with the same capacity as my 900H, 400 yards of 80 lb. line. The sword took an hour and change to land, weighed 260 lbs., and took him down to the last eight or ten wraps of line on the spool (I got a close look at one point.) 

 

If you think you'll do any particular fishing regularly, then it does pay to buy good gear. I infer from the OP that he's looking to try this fishery and not commit heavily, yet.

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1 hour ago, Markushook said:

This^^

And DO NOT forget a belt!

Actually, (and granted, not my cup of tea, only done PBs offshore twice - a funeral and another time when the capatin invited me on a charter b/c the crew was real small) you probably can get away without one.  Use the rail as leverage - foregrip on the rail and rod butt under your armpit.

 

But correct me if I'm wrong.

Edited by makorider

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It seems a 6/0 will do for most tuna i MIGHT encounter but I'll be under gunned if I happen to hook a sword.

They say 3.5 - 9oz jigs and for me jigging 9oz jigs for hours and hours ends up being a lot of work.

This isn't something I expect to do often something cheap but reliable would be cool. 

Apparently they rent shimano's spooled with 100 lb mono. The proble is ive been on a.lot of this sort of trip in my travels and ive never seen a decent rental.

Rod and reel aside what else should be in my bag? Leader material ect but what hooks?

thanks. im am looking forward to this and maybe I'll even catch a fish

 

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Gammi live bait hooks small enough to fit in a butterfish.  Don't be afraid of keeping them small; those hooks are incredibly strong.

 

Don't forget lead.  I prefer an egg sinker above the swivel.

 

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