LGFishing

Tips for an intermediate?

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7 hours ago, FlatWing said:

I do not know what the modern day Penn's and ABU's are capable of.  My statements are regarding reliability/quality control based on my experiences with the 7000i and reviews on line that speak to the new Penn's vs. the 525 Mags.  As I stated, all my ABU's are pre-2005 Swedish made and my Penn's are 525Mags modified for knobby mag control.  I was hoping some SOL'ers would address AKIOS with 1st hand knowledge - I know they have left hand retrieve model, specifically the Akios S-Line Left Hand Series 651 CTM, and I have not seen anything negative posted here or elsewhere about them - they are also very reasonably priced, in my opinion.

I've posted this before in the distance casting forum, but here are the results from the last Sport Cast USA tournament I participated in, which was a fisherman's cast-a-muck, so "Full Tournament" rods and casts were not allowed, so you will see Uni-Tech, aerolized Uni-Tech, Hatteras and OTG fishing casts utilized with distances measured by use of a range finder.

 

2012_Cast-A-Muck_Results (2).xls

 

You may recall that after Hurricane Irene (Fall 2011), Striper fishing from the surf involved delivering Sand Eel imitations over the outer bar - most folks were wading out there on both sides of low tide.  Those of us physically unable to do so who could execute 350-400ft casts were able to catch from solid beach. I personally used a 3oz T-Hex, 4oz Diamond Jig, heavy Hag's Tackle Sting Silver or, in extreme cases, a 125gm bullet lead to deliver a Flatwing Fly Teaser rigged 4 1/2 ft above the terminal clip of my rig.  Using 30lb PP with a 60lb PP Hollow Ace "shock leader", I had no difficulty keeping in touch with my lure during what was admittedly a very slow retrieve (after quickly picking up slack) that allowed the fly to "swim".  Perhaps because I have, since 1992, fished exclusively crushed barbs, I had no difficulty with hook up.  Also, I had no difficulty with controlling the fish, but I also use LC rods (Zziplex, Century and Shimano) of 101/2 - 14ft lengths, which have a completely different action than fiberglass, graphite or more parabolic action carbon rods, such as the Century Slingshot or FSC Predator (which I use for "short cast" work). 

I understand your reply, and it makes a lot of sense. It does, though, sound like you're fishing sandy beach terrain. I was specifically thinking of the rocky structure I fish, often with different current speeds between shore and the end of a cast, and lots of obstacles to bring the fish through. Long distance casting is an art that intrigues me. But for a novice, I think learning how to find fish, fight and land them would be something they should learn before expanding their skills to long-distance fishing. 

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3 hours ago, baldwin said:

I understand your reply, and it makes a lot of sense. It does, though, sound like you're fishing sandy beach terrain. I was specifically thinking of the rocky structure I fish, often with different current speeds between shore and the end of a cast, and lots of obstacles to bring the fish through. Long distance casting is an art that intrigues me. But for a novice, I think learning how to find fish, fight and land them would be something they should learn before expanding their skills to long-distance fishing. 

I agree with your priority of learning for a novice.  My perspective is that of someone who had to give up the rocks after 1988, when the drunk irreparably altered my life.  For many years, my favorite walk-on spot was the rip alongside the Manasquan Inlet North Jetty on the Beach side.  My go to outfit was a 9ft 6in All Star BGS1145-2.  Now,  post Sandy replenishment, that beach is un-walkable to me, and the distance from the beach to the jetty kick-out is no longer sufficient to form a decent rip. 

The beaches I can drive on, with the exception of IBSP, have all be replenished, so any pre-existing structure is buried, and really the only hope of decent sized bass and blues is to hit 300+ feet.  Accordingly, 99% of my plugging there is with the "delivery weight"/Flatwing fly teaser rig I described in my 2nd post.  The great thing about Flatwing teasers is that you can imitate anything from spearing up to bunker/squid, depending on the number of hackles you employ, and their construction allows them to emulate fish swimming action without having bulk, since the bucktail throat and wing are tied sparse, or palmered Marabou is employed as a collar.  Just be sure to tie them on heavier hooks than the EC253/254 used in Fly Casting, as these will likely be opened by the lack of "spring" in the spinning/conventional rod.  My hook of choice is the Mustad Tarpon Hook C68SNP-DT 2XH/2XS in 4/0.

IBSP still has good structure, so most of the sand used to the north, when stripped by a storm, seems to go out from the beach, as opposed to north with the littoral current, but it does seem like the pocket next to the Barnegat Inlet North Jetty is filling in.

Edited by FlatWing

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You should probably learn more about line, what reels lay line well and cast with less frustration, and find out how your casts work with your rod. Reels that lay line well and release line easily will allow you more freedom to cast into or against wind, ease into a few casts or really lean into one here and there.

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14 hours ago, cheech said:

If you go with a round reel, get a levelwind, much easier for plugging. The Abu 6500 cs mag elite or a Penn 525 have been my only plugging reels for many years. Surf casting a spinner is a work in progress for me. Dry land practice is where I hash things out.

CE6A2466-0423-4B72-B895-250B4F5DE5F8.jpeg

For the rod, is spinner and round reel different?  Or one rod can use for both style of fishing?

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3 hours ago, Pierce said:

For the rod, is spinner and round reel different?  Or one rod can use for both style of fishing?

Generally speaking rods for conventional reels have a significantly lower-to-the-blank type of guide installed, and the stripper guide will be closer to the reel seat and of a smaller diameter than it would be on a spinner.  There are however, exceptions to this generality - a high quality carbon blank, which will have a much less pronounced spline, can be wrapped with Fuji Low Rider guides, and if thin, limp braid is used on the spinning reel, and the spinning reel is an angle foot Long Cast design, (such as the Daiwa Tournament Basia or even better, a Surf Basia) then this rod can be used with both a conventional and a spinning reel with no significant difference in casting distance.  A prime example of this is the Daiwa Tournament Ballistic series of rods. I would, however, caution against assuming that every production rod wrapped with these guides is the same as the Daiwa.  To the best of my knowledge, these are the only production rods for which the manufacturer states the dual usability and provides a limited lifetime warrantee.

 

As an example, Daiwa wrappes the Coastal Surf Pro rods with the same guides, but does not state they are dual purpose.

Daiwa Tournament Ballistic Surf Rod.jpg

Edited by FlatWing

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My suggestion if going conventional would be a siegler sm with a 13' if your looking for a 8nbait. But no matter what a 150yd is a poke that not that many can achieve.

A good budget reel is Akio's, I have 757ct that I can almost hit 100yrds on a football field. If you want more pro's and con's on the akio let me know.

Hope this helps.

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On 9/9/2019 at 3:02 PM, FlatWing said:

I agree with your priority of learning for a novice.  My perspective is that of someone who had to give up the rocks after 1988, when the drunk irreparably altered my life.  For many years, my favorite walk-on spot was the rip alongside the Manasquan Inlet North Jetty on the Beach side.  My go to outfit was a 9ft 6in All Star BGS1145-2.  Now,  post Sandy replenishment, that beach is un-walkable to me, and the distance from the beach to the jetty kick-out is no longer sufficient to form a decent rip. 

The beaches I can drive on, with the exception of IBSP, have all be replenished, so any pre-existing structure is buried, and really the only hope of decent sized bass and blues is to hit 300+ feet.  Accordingly, 99% of my plugging there is with the "delivery weight"/Flatwing fly teaser rig I described in my 2nd post.  The great thing about Flatwing teasers is that you can imitate anything from spearing up to bunker/squid, depending on the number of hackles you employ, and their construction allows them to emulate fish swimming action without having bulk, since the bucktail throat and wing are tied sparse, or palmered Marabou is employed as a collar.  Just be sure to tie them on heavier hooks than the EC253/254 used in Fly Casting, as these will likely be opened by the lack of "spring" in the spinning/conventional rod.  My hook of choice is the Mustad Tarpon Hook C68SNP-DT 2XH/2XS in 4/0.

IBSP still has good structure, so most of the sand used to the north, when stripped by a storm, seems to go out from the beach, as opposed to north with the littoral current, but it does seem like the pocket next to the Barnegat Inlet North Jetty is filling in.

Wow, I'm really sorry to hear about the encounter with the drunk. That's tragic.  On a lighter note, I also love flatwing flies. I love fly fishing and have been tying most of my flies flatwing-style for years. I love not only the versatility, but some other benefits of that tying style as well.

   If you hold a feather so that the flat surface is oriented vertically and wave it back and forth you see the action that traditional Deceiver style flies have. Rotate it 90 degrees so that the flat surface is oriented horizontally (flat wing style) and do the same. Notice the difference in action. When tied flat wing style the fly also sinks slower, allowing it more hang time in the strike zone and is especially valuable when swinging the fly in current and mending the line. 

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