Southcoastphil

Do any of you still use these old-school eels?

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I've yet to fish them, so I'd love to get your thoughts/results.

 

Top one says FELMLEE.

 

Next two are ALOU Eels, marked I and III, respectively.

 

Bottom is a GOT STRYPER.

 

Where and how do ya fish them?  Any results you'd care to share?

 

:bigeyes:

 

IMG_1930.JPG

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I've fished the Felmlee ones a few times around jetties with success. Can't say I've thrown one in probably 3-4 years though; I've snagged them and not replaced them. Good lures though! Definitely swim them with a slow retrieve. Let that eel swim!

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I used to fish the smaller of the two allow eels  from my 8 foot dinghy, trolling the flats around croton point in NY..Fished the larger one off the sand beach and rocks at Montauk. Nice that they were through wired and would take a few hits from blues before they were unusable, I didn't really have a supply of them so I don't know how well I would have done while wet suiting I liked them.

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The got strypers are my go-to on a jig head in the back bay when there’s lots of tidal flow.  They don’t seem like they should have much action but man they catch fish.  I need to give them more attempts in the surf.  

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10 mins ago, LateralLineSider said:

The got strypers are my go-to on a jig head in the back bay when there’s lots of tidal flow.  They don’t seem like they should have much action but man they catch fish.  I need to give them more attempts in the surf.  

My initial assessment as well.  Haven't fished any of these yet.

 

They kinda sound like the needlefish's cousin in the straight rubber family, no?

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9 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

I've yet to fish them, so I'd love to get your thoughts/results.

 

Top one says FELMLEE.

 

Next two are ALOU Eels, marked I and III, respectively.

 

Bottom is a GOT STRYPER.

 

Where and how do ya fish them?  Any results you'd care to share?

 

:bigeyes:

 

IMG_1930.JPG

Second one down....is that rigged correctly?  I always thought that they were  supposed to be straight to avoid not coming in spinning or twisting. Maybe cast and test them to see what they do in daylight hours so you know what they will do and when its dark you already know. 

I never fish with anything that i haven't given a test ride in daylight. 

I have some spoons rigged just like this but "straight" that i have done good with on RI beaches in the past. 

Good luck with them. :wave:

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Ha, I hadn’t thought of that but very true.  I fish them slow and low just off the bottom in sweeping current.  Basically just fast enough to make it seem naturally moving with the water.  Have been loosing the back third of a couple a night to blues but shops near me have them cheap enough.  

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I Have a bunch of the got stryper eels that i got on the bst. They have great action on a point jude wobble head. I need to toss them more. I need to toss rubber more in general actually.

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10 hours ago, Southcoastphil said:

I've yet to fish them, so I'd love to get your thoughts/results.

 

Top one says FELMLEE.

 

Next two are ALOU Eels, marked I and III, respectively.

 

Bottom is a GOT STRYPER.

 

Where and how do ya fish them?  Any results you'd care to share?

 

:bigeyes:

 

IMG_1930.JPG

Felmlee yes, I actually have one rigged and one extra eel. I rarely throw it.  I have never caught a fish on it.  I have quite a few 2” and 4” felmlee eels. I’ve done well with them as teasers and bucktail dressings. 

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2 hours ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

Second one down....is that rigged correctly?  I always thought that they were  supposed to be straight to avoid not coming in spinning or twisting. Maybe cast and test them to see what they do in daylight hours so you know what they will do and when its dark you already know. 

I never fish with anything that i haven't given a test ride in daylight. 

I have some spoons rigged just like this but "straight" that i have done good with on RI beaches in the past. 

Good luck with them. :wave:

Greetings, mate!

 

That's what it looked like when I got it.  I agree that it looks a lil dodgy like that.  When I use squids (90% w/dead eels, the remainder with sluggos or similar) I also rig them such that the hook exits much closer to the head than what we're seeing with that Black Alou.  I'd have expected that hook to exit about half way between the current exit and the tip of the "snout".  

 

Although tough to see in the pic, that squid has been bent (at *both* ends) to a more pronounced "S" shape, (compare it to the shape of third one) which suggests to me that the front of the squid will rise during retrieve.  How much?  Dunno.  (Yet.)

 

If we consider the eel body as being horizontal in this pic, then lifting the leading edge of that squid by some 20* might result in the body of the eel remaining horizontal, but without that strange (to me) kink just aft of the eye.

 

"Why would one do that?", I wondered.  My hypotheses:

 

  1. Increases prey visibility and/or proximity to predators and minimizes bottom hangups:  This keeps the eel higher off the bottom while still maintaining a very slow retrieve.  
  2. This minimizes snagging the squid body:  The steeper angle of the squid allows it to better rise over (and/or slide off to the side of) obstacles because the point of contact has changed from the wide and flat (in x-section) very front of the squid to the narrower (and softly keeled) area in the lower 2/3 of the squid, which, in contrast to the "head-on" impact allows for deflection.  (If an arrow hits a shield head on, it either penetrates or stops.  Change the receiving angle of the shield enough and the arrow continues its forward motion, but in a slightly different direction.  Hope that makes sense.)
  3. This also minimizes snagging the squid hook:  If the squid, the squid hook and the eel are all parallel to each other--Think of dragging the rubber eel horizontally through the water behind a diamond jig; The jig and the eel are essentially in a straight line, while the hook point rides away from the jig-eel line--the 7/8" gap can allow many things to snag the hook.  With our current approach, the squid (and the eel rubber that's on the hook shank) shield the hook's point and gap from obstacles.
  4. The motion of the eel is more lifelike:  Presenting what's effectively the "keeled bottom face" of the squid, plus the foremost 1" of the eel, at a 45* to the water it's trying to move through means that the squid has to respond to a drastically greater volume of water than would be the case in my crude horizontal straight line scenario.  (Although the traditional approach moves the squid through the water at an angle, it is still moving through the water mostly horizontally.)  As the squid's face and keel respond to the water pressure, the squid "rocks" along its axis (the opposing long edges alternate respective high-low positions) but not moving very much laterally, resulting in the eel shimmying behind the squid.  Increasing the vertical angle of the squid as we pull it horizontally through the water also causes rocking of the squid, but with significant differences:

4a.  The squid rocks in a different (more vertical) plane, and

4b.  The force of the water impacts the squid at a sharper angle, exposing a much longer length of the keel to the greater force.

 

These result in much greater lateral motion of the squid, which causes a greater side-to-side motion for the head of the eel, which exposes more of the length of the eel to the force of the water, which causes the eel's motion to change from a shimmy to a more S-shaped undulation, which more accurately mimics live eels' swimming behavior.

 

What do you all think? 

 

Maybe I am way off base.  Maybe I am on target.

 

In either case, I'm looking forward to some daytime data collection next week!

 

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I've used those, and the Ultimus eels that SOL used to sell, off the bank of a Chanel in RI, in place of the live eels. 

I didn't rig mine like those. I put the hook through the lower tip and run the line through from the tail hook to that center eye on the squid 

CIMG4507.JPG

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