coastalfreak

Consensus on Old vs New Reels

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Yes, I know we are beating a dead horse here, but I really want to hear yalls thoughts. 

 

I saw a video of a guy fishing a Shimano Saragossa and besides a Penn and a Mitchell 300. Complained that the reels were clunky, not smooth, slow, but robust and durable. Long story short he much preferred the Gosa. 

 

Anyhow, I love heard other people say that new reels won’t last long whatsoever and that old reels are the only way to go. 

 

Thoughts?

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 An indestructable clunky old reel that never dies should always be stashed in the truck as a backup for the fancy smooth reels that don't last more than a couple of seasons

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They made poor quality reels in the old days too, they just haven't survived.

A high-end modern reel is better in most ways but usually has a higher part count, which increases the rate of failure. Then some manufacturers discontinue spare part production after a few years which makes it a dead reel.

 

Some manufacturers are better than others when it comes to this stuff. I believe the the Penn Torque for example has less than half the parts of the Shimano Stella, and Penn has an excellent track record when it comes to parts availability. But the Torque is not quite as silky smooth as the Stella, so it's a tradeoff.

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New reels are more enjoyable to use, but many old reels will outlast them.  IAR instead of ratchet AR systems is a huge improvement, not to mention overall smoothness.  New reels typically handle braided line better and have better drags too.  New reels are usually lighter.

 

Has anyone here actually killed a 704?  I know I sure haven't.

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I have a gosa for the surf and a pair of Stradics for inshore boat fishing and they are sweet. Silky smooth and a pleasure to fish. But from the looks of the schematics I’m scared to open them up for maintenance. I am very careful to keep them from dunking.  After 3 seasons they are still like new. I also have several penn SS reels from the early 1980s that I consider the best spinners penn made.  They have had lots of use for 30 years and are smooth as they were when new.  They are made with quantity materials and are easy to maintain. I could be happy only using them. Similarly for chunking I have a couple penn mag 980 reels that are indestructible. My penn squall is lighter and casts a little further but I could be happy only fishing my 980s.  Bottom line is I like old penn reels and new rods.  The material improvements in rods make the performance of newer rods a big improvement over old rods. 

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Everyone made good and junk over the years.  

 

Been pretty happy with my new fleet this past year.  Ssv6500ll for live bait mono or heavier braid jigging inlets,  ssv4500 for beach fishing,  ssv3500 for fluke fishing,  shimano sahara 2500 for freshwater.

 

I have the old penn ss reels as loaners and casting sabikis in the hudson.  They're tanks.  I also love the penn 560l for live lining too.  You can still buy that reel new on ebay.

 

I still use the 1st reel I ever bought a large penn silver series.   It don't like braid, but chugs along on mono.

 

I can't speak for others, but I feel you don't need to spend more than $150 to get a great reel. You can but used or wait for a line to discontinue to freshen the fleet.  

 

I was getting spinfisher ssv reels for 75-100 each.  Bought 8 total for maybe $600.

 

 

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My old SS 750 is still in good order ... but the bail WILL flip in mid-cast, and cost me a lure, now and then. Very annoying.  Spooling it with braid would cost a ridiculous amount of money, and I'm not sure how well it would like braid in the first place. An excellent drag, I admit. 

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Prefer new reels to the point where I've sold most of the"old reliables" minus a couple Newells. Mid-range/higher end new reels are very reliable, but the "economical" choices these days are disposable.

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1 hour ago, BrianBM said:

My old SS 750 is still in good order ... but the bail WILL flip in mid-cast, and cost me a lure, now and then. Very annoying.  Spooling it with braid would cost a ridiculous amount of money, and I'm not sure how well it would like braid in the first place. An excellent drag, I admit. 

It's the same reason I got rid of a 650 ss. I replaced it with a slammer 460 and didn't have the problem again. 

As far as old vs new, how about a bit of both.

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The two reels I still use are a Penn Fathom12 (2012 release) and a hot rodded 1960s Penn Squidder 140 (1938 release).

The Fathom is amazing at everything, but the Squidder has history and an anti reverse on off lever.

 

I'd rather plug with the Fathom, but I'd rather chunk with the Squidder

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19 hours ago, Sudsy said:

 An indestructable clunky old reel that never dies should always be stashed in the truck as a backup for the fancy smooth reels that don't last more than a couple of seasons

I keep a 704z or 706 in the truck just in case one of my newer reels fails on me.. or if I'm just feeling nostalgic.

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I still use my 704 greenie for chunking stripers. The one difference I have found with New vs. Old is the line lay on the spool particularly with using braid. Those old Penn spinning reels are battle tanks, but I wouldn't necessarily use them for plugging with braid. I find I get too many wind knots if if do. If I'm just throwing bait and not constantly retrieving, the older Penn reels and are hard to beat.   

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20 hours ago, Sudsy said:

 An indestructable clunky old reel that never dies should always be stashed in the truck as a backup for the fancy smooth reels that don't last more than a couple of seasons

Exactly . . . always carry an old 706 ready to back-up my VS . . . actually did put it into action recently and after a few casts felt like old times.

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