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Titanty

Bilge Pumps

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How many of you that leave your boats in the water all season have rewired your bilge pumps direct to the battery (with fuse protection).  My factory wiring is thru the battery selector switch and then on a toggle on the dash.

 

Leaving the main switch on with everything energized seems like a waste...the battery would die too fast with all the unnecessary loads.

 

I think I will connect it and a back up pump (mounted higher than the main bilge pump) direct to the batteries.

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Even though I have shore power, both pumps are always hot, though I pull them from the hot side of the batt switches.

 

I pull the fuses when the boat gets hauled

Edited by makorider

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We run our boats pretty much daily and do daily checks on the pumps, but ours are wired directly to the battery just in case. Having your bilge pumps switched off when you leave the  boat is asking for trouble. I can’t tell you how many sunken boats we’ve raised because the pump/pumps weren’t functioning. 

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Imo you want a two battery setup with one pump wire directly to battery or have shore power.  A reg swing back float are prone to fail get a newer style pump more reliable .a 500gh is a joke..aslo when looking at pumps get one you can service with cartridges swap out. Buy an extra cartridges. 

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Thanks all!

 

I will plan on (2) pumps in my bilge, one direct connected to each battery.  I think I will mount one at a higher elevation to work as the back up.

 

the existing pump is a 800GPH and I will match the new one...should be enough for my 21' CC.

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1 hour ago, Titanty said:

Thanks all!

 

I will plan on (2) pumps in my bilge, one direct connected to each battery.  I think I will mount one at a higher elevation to work as the back up.

 

the existing pump is a 800GPH and I will match the new one...should be enough for my 21' CC.

Then put a 1500 or 2K in

 

800 does NOT move that much water.  Put a big 2nd in to handle something failing.

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Are you sure that the pumps are not wired directly? Most boats, from the factory are wired from the battery to a dash mounted switch on one side but on the other they're wired directly to the float switch. That way you can turn the pump on from the dash switch, but it will always be on from the float switch.

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13 hours ago, Titanty said:

Thanks all!

 

I will plan on (2) pumps in my bilge, one direct connected to each battery.  I think I will mount one at a higher elevation to work as the back up.

 

the existing pump is a 800GPH and I will match the new one...should be enough for my 21' CC.

I wouldn’t mount the other pump higher. Maybe forward or aft of the other, but not higher. If the lower pump fails and enough water accumulates in the bilge, the weight could cause discharge thru-hulls and/or scuppers to sink below the water which is usually a death blow, especially if there’s any sort of sea state. 

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On 8/27/2019 at 9:12 AM, 757saltwater said:

Only direct connect to one battery. The other battery is there to start the engine if battery one dies..  

I disagree.  Primary purpose of bilge pumps is to keep a boat that is docked from filling up and sinking.  If your boat is taking on water continuously and your pumps are running, they are  going to run down the battery and your boat will  sink.  If you have a second pump mounted slightly higher than the first, wired to a second battery, you will have more time to discover the issue and fix it before the boat sinks.  That second pump should also be connected to a high water alarm, so that if it runs, the alarm will go off and hopefully, someone at the marina will be alerted to the problem and let you know if you're not around or tend to it themselves.

 

If you're at sea and you start taking on water,  the first thing you do is start the motor, so having a bilge pump run down your battery shouldn't really occur.  Also, if while at sea, you notice you're bilge pump running more often than normal, without an obvious reason, you should be starting the motor and heading for the dock as your first course of action.

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16 hours ago, Seadogg said:

I wouldn’t mount the other pump higher. Maybe forward or aft of the other, but not higher. If the lower pump fails and enough water accumulates in the bilge, the weight could cause discharge thru-hulls and/or scuppers to sink below the water which is usually a death blow, especially if there’s any sort of sea state. 

I disagree with this as well.  A system where your second bilge pump is mounted so high that it allows enough water to enter the hull and submerge your thru hulls is a completely flawed system.  The second pump should be just high enough so that it only runs if the first pump is not working.  If both pumps are operating at the same time all the time, it takes away some of your redundancy and makes it harder to identify a potential problem.

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