Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
joe0306

Two unrelated questions about circle hooks and Seagulls

Rate this topic

22 posts in this topic

Posted (edited) · Report post

Hey all, just some questions that came up during fishing today.

 

First:

What is the best strategy for setting a circle hook on a striper after you feel a bite? I've heard to release the bail, reel in slightly, or tilt rod 90 degrees. What is the best way in your experience directly after feeling the bite? I use a spin reel btw, fishing from rocks.

 

I gut hooked my 2nd schoolie today on J hooks and really want to stop doing this, so it seems my only option are circles.

 

Second:

 

Is there anything to do with overly aggressive seagulls? They seem to be the gray type of seagulls that began to show up at my fishing spot, and these birds chase anything that I cast and steal a ton of my bait immediately after I cast. What can I do? 

 

Also, unfortunately managed to catch 2 of these birds, one with a hook and the other on a 7 inch SP minnow which I retrieved from the bird. Is there anything I can do other than finding a new spot?

Edited by joe0306

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seagulls , no idea they can be a pain in the arse. As far as setting circles and I've been using them for a while. For me depends on the size of the bait. Live lining a large pogie or mack I open the bail or free spool it after the pick up to give the bass time to swallow it. Probably 3-5 seconds then flip the bail or thumb the spool and slowly lift the rod up, slowly but apply enough pressure to set the hook. If that makes sense, just don't rip the rod like your setting a J hook. With chunks and I learned this from a commercial guy years ago he would just keep the drag at the fighting tension and let the fish hook itself because it will swallow the chunk quickly. It worked for him and works for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, alpha baiter said:

Seagulls , no idea they can be a pain in the arse. As far as setting circles and I've been using them for a while. For me depends on the size of the bait. Live lining a large pogie or mack I open the bail or free spool it after the pick up to give the bass time to swallow it. Probably 3-5 seconds then flip the bail or thumb the spool and slowly lift the rod up, slowly but apply enough pressure to set the hook. If that makes sense, just don't rip the rod like your setting a J hook. With chunks and I learned this from a commercial guy years ago he would just keep the drag at the fighting tension and let the fish hook itself because it will swallow the chunk quickly. It worked for him and works for me.

More or less how I do it. I remember being fascinated as to how simple it is. There really is no "setting" of the hook as it will set itself from the tension and most times in the corner of the mouth. Very satisfying when releasing too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, alpha baiter said:

Seagulls , no idea they can be a pain in the arse. As far as setting circles and I've been using them for a while. For me depends on the size of the bait. Live lining a large pogie or mack I open the bail or free spool it after the pick up to give the bass time to swallow it. Probably 3-5 seconds then flip the bail or thumb the spool and slowly lift the rod up, slowly but apply enough pressure to set the hook. If that makes sense, just don't rip the rod like your setting a J hook. With chunks and I learned this from a commercial guy years ago he would just keep the drag at the fighting tension and let the fish hook itself because it will swallow the chunk quickly. It worked for him and works for me.

What do you mean by the fighting tension? What drag should I ideally set? just started fishing seriously this season sorry if this is a dumb question

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

Just make sure your drag is set properly.  The fish will create the tension as he runs. Experiment a little with the drag settings.

Edited by Malsow
Info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Birds, nothing you can do.

 

A cormorant got our lure yesterday, bastard actually bit me when I was trying to unfree it, ungrateful sob. Broke skin, went and got a tetanus shot just to be safe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 mins ago, Malsow said:

Just make sure your drag is set properly.  The fish will create the tension as he runs. Experiment a little with the drag settings.

^^ that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 mins ago, fishonnelsons said:

Birds, nothing you can do.

 

A cormorant got our lure yesterday, bastard actually bit me when I was trying to unfree it, ungrateful sob. Broke skin, went and got a tetanus shot just to be safe.

cormorants are the worst when it comes to release. great blue herons are no picnic either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With a sweatshirt on, offer the bird your right forearm. When he bites, or tries to bite, grab his head with your left. Hold him beak up. The bird will relax and you will be able to untangle him, kinda like a largemouth bass by the lip. If the hooks are in his beak, throw the sweatshirt over him and try to grab his neck. This is my friend Chuckie demonstrating how calm a cormorant can be.

bird.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recall being hung up on a gull.  Braid was wrapped around its neck and wings.  I admit, I was not at all gentle when I reeled him in.  Poor bird was flapping and jumping all around when I pulled him up on the rocks.

 

Sully was with me at the time and was key in throwing his shirt over the bird and without cutting my line, getting it untangled.

 

Once free, we thought the bird would  beat a hasty retreat from us.  But no. The gull just remained 4-5 feet away from us. It took a few steps, was not apparently hurt, but remained close to us.

 

It was like he wanted to befriend us and thank us for freeing him.  Very odd behavior we thought..    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Joe G said:

 

 

Sully was with me at the time and was key in throwing his shirt over the bird and without cutting my line, getting it untangled.

 

 

I've handled dozens of "caught" birds over the years, mine and friend's and often stranger's.  Even handled a magnificent loon once.  The absolute rule #1 is to immediately cover their eyes

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, joe0306 said:

What do you mean by the fighting tension? What drag should I ideally set? 

About half the breaking strength of your line, or enough to bend your rod 90 degrees, whatever is less. Four pounds will finish a striper quickly, eight would be fine for cows in heavy current.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, ermghoti said:

About half the breaking strength of your line, or enough to bend your rod 90 degrees, whatever is less. Four pounds will finish a striper quickly, eight would be fine for cows in heavy current.

Does improper drag contribute to gut hooking a fish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, joe0306 said:

What do you mean by the fighting tension? What drag should I ideally set? just started fishing seriously this season sorry if this is a dumb question

No need to set your drag for anything other than fighting the fish. Just point the rod towards the fish and reel slowly in. Not to slow just normal winding to take up slack you will feel the tension and so will he. As he tries to escape the bait will come out of his gut and slide out till it hits the bone in his jaw. He will hook himself. Then your drag will come into play.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

35 mins ago, joe0306 said:

Does improper drag contribute to gut hooking a fish?

Not exactly, the suggestion was to leave the reel with its drag fully engaged, as opposed to in freespool or with a baitfeeder engaged, and set in an immovable rod holder. If the bait fits easily in the target fish's mouth, a tight line and full drag will set the hook as close to 100% as you can get, with nearly no chance of gut hooking, unless they vacuum it straight into the gullet, or swim in creating slack and you don't notice (you should be doing what Stonesipher says). Any misses can be chalked up to fish too small to engulf the bait, so you don't really miss out on anything.

Edited by ermghoti

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.