cityevader

Rod length advantages/disadvantages

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Please forgive the noob questions... 

 

I broke my (first "real" rod)  9' Penn Prevail while loading up my vehicle for a fishing trip (at least there was the boy's 7' Ugly Stik, so I headed out regardless.) 

 

Now I'm looking at the Penn Battalion which has the same lure rating of 3/4-3oz...but in either 9 or 10'.

 

Will a longer rod throw a LURE farther? 

To refrash the question, do lures- let's say an SP Minnow and NOT some monster CCC lure- have a terminal velocity?

Would the rod length even matter, as long as the appropriate tip speed is reached? I imagine a longer rod will throw a lead weight farther, but a lure? 

 

A longer rod can hold line up higher over cresting waves, but is harder to pull seaweed from the tip guide (the last three trips were PLAGUED with seaweed each and every cast over 2 miles worth of three separate beaches.)

Does a longer rod take more effort to throw the same lure? 

 

Any other advantages/disadvantages to consider? 

 

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I do believe that the trajectory makes a difference In casting distance but from a 9 to a 10 ft I think that advantage will be minimal based on aerodynamic of the lure to overcome resistance and gravity is always pulling weight down ,higher and faster you get it out there before it get suck down the farther it goes. From a 8 ft to a 10 ft I think the advantage is more significant in casting distance To maximize the distance the action of the rod vs the way you cast makes the most difference. If the rod has same action I think less effort for the longer rods. 

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A lot has to do with where you are fishing. A 9 foot rod is a very universal size. It fits comfortably in many beach and jetty fishing situations. Longer rods when properly matched with the right reel and line will always cast further than their shorter versions. How much further involves several variables. The tradeoff is the overall  added weight and in some situations like on jetties the added length can be cumbersome. 

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Well, I went with two rods. :)  If I broke one once, it might happen again...gotta have a better backup than my boy's 7-footer!

 

Went with the Battalion 9' rated 1/2-2oz rod for the smaller lures, and the 10' rated 3/4-3oz rod for everything else.

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3 hours ago, cityevader said:

Well, I went with two rods. :)  If I broke one once, it might happen again...gotta have a better backup than my boy's 7-footer!

 

Went with the Battalion 9' rated 1/2-2oz rod for the smaller lures, and the 10' rated 3/4-3oz rod for everything else.

Now you need a bait rod 10' or  1 to 5 oz or better 11' 2 to 6 oz or a 3 to 8 oz . That's if your soaking bait. But for casting plugs and tins your all set. Tight lines.

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I dislike the idea of soaking bait, and planting a pole in the ground doesn't align with walking around trying to figure out where the Perch are biting, where/how the water is moving, and attempting to learn the slow, difficult way of how to read the water and the structure beneath it. 

 

For now, I'm not necessarily targeting large fish, but still want the ability to toss lures to some reasonable distance...I'm merely trying to learn "how" to fish, and "when" to fish, and trying to keep up with a journal of times/tides, conditions, and outcome of each trip. Maybe I can learn more with actual numbers to review.

(too bad there doesn't seem to be any Perch forums; only Striper forums...I feel kinda out of place here.)

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5 mins ago, cityevader said:

 

 

For now, I'm not necessarily targeting large fish, but still want the ability to toss lures to some reasonable distance...I'm merely trying to learn "how" to fish, and "when" to fish, and trying to keep up with a journal of times/tides, conditions, and outcome of each trip. Maybe I can learn more with actual numbers to review.

(too bad there doesn't seem to be any Perch forums; only Striper forums...I feel kinda out of place here.)

Its strange, the shore guys want to cast far away from shore, the boaters want to cast as close to shore as possible, the fish can be anywhere. Don't overthink it to much. There is a sub-forum here for strictly freshwater fishing...

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13 mins ago, nuub said:

Its strange, the shore guys want to cast far away from shore, the boaters want to cast as close to shore as possible, the fish can be anywhere. Don't overthink it to much. There is a sub-forum here for strictly freshwater fishing...

Some of my best saltwater fishing has been just beyond the breakers. We're talking 30-40 feet. 

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I only saltwater fish. 

My aiming point is usually just beyond the breakers. Sometimes that's well over a hundred feet. Sometimes i'm lucky to get fifty feet from a one ounce lure helicoptering through the air. 

Sometimes our beaches are dead flat, with the entire shoreline breaking at once with endless wash. Sometimes they're sawtoothed with some breakers right at your feet and i'm catching them six feet out. 

 

I don't believe i'm overthinking it, putting in the time and effort to see if there is a pattern between productive and non-productive days. Nor in asking if a 9 or 10' rod will throw an SP Minnow a similar distance, or if either length is overall more advantageous. 

 

I'm also not the type to ask questions, wanting a "gimme" shortcut to you folks' vast years of knowledge earned the hard way.

I am learning the hard way, by myself, and just need a tidbit here and there on the mechanics/techniques of some things. 

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Well now you have the opportunity to try the light lures on both rods, and you definitely should.

All else being equal, the lure's speed as it begins flight should be 11.1% faster on the 10' rod vs. the 9', plus you have an additional foot of height at the launch point, so gravity takes longer to bring the lure down to the surface. How this translates to real world throwing distance is beyond my calculating abilities, but the 10' should throw even a light lure a good bit further. Personally I have only tried this on 8' vs 10' and the difference is quite profound with 1/4 oz lures.

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2 hours ago, jcberg said:

Well now you have the opportunity to try the light lures on both rods, and you definitely should.

All else being equal, the lure's speed as it begins flight should be 11.1% faster on the 10' rod vs. the 9', plus you have an additional foot of height at the launch point, so gravity takes longer to bring the lure down to the surface. How this translates to real world throwing distance is beyond my calculating abilities, but the 10' should throw even a light lure a good bit further. Personally I have only tried this on 8' vs 10' and the difference is quite profound with 1/4 oz lures.

Even for a detail nut like me, this is too much.  Yikes.

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somewhere I heard about 10 yds per extra foot of rod length. so I tested w 4 rods and was surprised is was fairly true. rods used were airwave 9, Albright 10, team daiwa 11, and century 12.6. the century surely kicked more ass. all rods tested w ranger on the sand.... so throwing ranger added a real life element as some times they fly better than other times....ymmv

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3 hours ago, jcberg said:

 

All else being equal, the lure's speed as it begins flight should be 11.1% faster on the 10' rod 

 

 

All else wont be equal...the longer rod is heavier, has more inertia, especially out at its tip, and wont be accellerated at the same rate by someone applying equal force to it.  If it were as simple as length=distance we'd all be using 20 foot rods.  In reality very few people have the strength and ability to cast even a 12 foot rod effectively and most max-out with something around 10 feet long.

 

 

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I never seem to get my questions readily understood. 

1st question was asking for a comparison of (even subtle) differences in general, of advantage/disadvantage of 9' vs 10' rod. 

 

2nd question was if a lightweight lure that is affected by wind resistance could actually be thrown farther by a longer rod. NOT chunking heavy weights! Just light lures. A short rod can be whipped quite fast. 

Dammit... Ima gonna have to compare my 7' rated 3/8-1oz against the new 10' rated 3/4—3oz out on the football field with an SP Minnow minus hooks, huh? 

 

... I DID say i'm learning the hard way, by myself... so this test will tell me what i need to know, without needing to ask "the internet" first. :)

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