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JButts

Get Extra Season Out Of Waders

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They sell a huge tube of aquaseal for $30. Keep it in the freezer to prevent curing between uses. Before putting it away, close the cap on it and then open it slightly and squeeze it to remove air from the cap area before putting it in freezer--prevents the tube opening from curing over. 

 

Get a 50pack of latex gloves for working with the aquaseal. And some popsickle sticks. Will also need some nylon like ripstop nylon or maybe something thicker. Haven't found best material yet.   

 

My evolving theory on wader repair is basically: use a fabric backing for all repairs other than pin prick holes. Do a big preventitive repair for a high leak probability area rather than just fixing the leak. So if you get a leak near where the boot meets the wader inspect the whole area and if it look like it's highly worn all aroudn you can assume you'll get many more leaks there. So just patch the entire area.

 

Aquaseal will come off of rubber boots ventually but I think using the nylon fabric on top of the aquaseal gives it some protection from sun and also added strength. Run a popsicle stick over the nylon to ensure aqauseal gets in there evenly.

 

On boots make a patch that totally covers a high wear area. If you end a repair patch in middle of high wear area you'll just get a leak at where the repair ends.  

 

I have some other ideas but these are the big ones.  

 

Curious if other people have better ideas especially on how to patch boots. Boots leak the worst I find. Spiderweb cracking of rubber wherever it flexes--ankle area. 

 

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I started experimenting with plasti dip (rubber spray and dip) during the spring run. Resealed all of the seams in my stocking foot waders as a preventive measure. Noticed that it’s a little harder to slide the boots on. Maybe during the fall run I’ll reseal remaining seams. It’s too early to judge but i figured it will add an extra protection to the high wear areas. So far no leaks. 

Edited by SurfNY

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2 hours ago, JButts said:

They sell a huge tube of aquaseal for $30. Keep it in the freezer to prevent curing between uses. Before putting it away, close the cap on it and then open it slightly and squeeze it to remove air from the cap area before putting it in freezer--prevents the tube opening from curing over. 

 

Get a 50pack of latex gloves for working with the aquaseal. And some popsickle sticks. Will also need some nylon like ripstop nylon or maybe something thicker. Haven't found best material yet.   

 

My evolving theory on wader repair is basically: use a fabric backing for all repairs other than pin prick holes. Do a big preventitive repair for a high leak probability area rather than just fixing the leak. So if you get a leak near where the boot meets the wader inspect the whole area and if it look like it's highly worn all aroudn you can assume you'll get many more leaks there. So just patch the entire area.

 

Aquaseal will come off of rubber boots ventually but I think using the nylon fabric on top of the aquaseal gives it some protection from sun and also added strength. Run a popsicle stick over the nylon to ensure aqauseal gets in there evenly.

 

On boots make a patch that totally covers a high wear area. If you end a repair patch in middle of high wear area you'll just get a leak at where the repair ends.  

 

I have some other ideas but these are the big ones.  

 

Curious if other people have better ideas especially on how to patch boots. Boots leak the worst I find. Spiderweb cracking of rubber wherever it flexes--ankle area. 

 

 

I don't disagree with you, but question how the waders will be perceived if they are ultimately returned within or near a warranty period.   I can see the store or manufacturer saying all the treatments are what made them fail.   I remember once preventively covering the area where the material meets the boot with Aquaseal and being asked by Cabela's what I had done to them when they failed completely.      Fortunately, I'm now an LL Bean credit customer and spend a lot there, so I have little trouble with returns.  

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That's a good point Marty. I don't know what the deal is with LL Bean these days. But this is something to think of. I believe that sealing part of the waders will induce failure where the repair ends if the repair ends in a highwear/high-creasing area. So...caveat emptor

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Flex seal. My 2nd pair of waders this year is mostly flex seal now, like you said more is better. 

 

One day somebody should try flex seal right over their entire lower half

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23 mins ago, Sir Defyable said:

Flex seal. My 2nd pair of waders this year is mostly flex seal now, like you said more is better. 

 

One day somebody should try flex seal right over their entire lower half

Might try this on a leaky pair.

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Flex seal looks like it might be great for rubber boots as well. I;ll try some. I have these LL Bean superseam waders. The seams don't fail. But the fabric wears through at abrasion points. Also the boots get the spiderweb cracking at flex points. 

 

A couple questions about flex seal: 1) does flex seal adhere well to cured flex seal? 2) Does sun degrade flex seal? 3) how long does it take to cure

 

One thing I love about aquaseal: it's an overnight cure so you can patch the night a leak opens up. But you can also accelerate the cure using a tiny amount of cotol-13 which allows you to be back out fishing an hour after patching the wader, if that is necessary. There's also a UV aquaseal which I haven't tried. 

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3 hours ago, JButts said:

They sell a huge tube of aquaseal for $30. Keep it in the freezer to prevent curing between uses. Before putting it away, close the cap on it and then open it slightly and squeeze it to remove air from the cap area before putting it in freezer--prevents the tube opening from curing over. 

 

Get a 50pack of latex gloves for working with the aquaseal. And some popsickle sticks. Will also need some nylon like ripstop nylon or maybe something thicker. Haven't found best material yet.   

 

My evolving theory on wader repair is basically: use a fabric backing for all repairs other than pin prick holes. Do a big preventitive repair for a high leak probability area rather than just fixing the leak. So if you get a leak near where the boot meets the wader inspect the whole area and if it look like it's highly worn all aroudn you can assume you'll get many more leaks there. So just patch the entire area.

 

Aquaseal will come off of rubber boots ventually but I think using the nylon fabric on top of the aquaseal gives it some protection from sun and also added strength. Run a popsicle stick over the nylon to ensure aqauseal gets in there evenly.

 

On boots make a patch that totally covers a high wear area. If you end a repair patch in middle of high wear area you'll just get a leak at where the repair ends.  

 

I have some other ideas but these are the big ones.  

 

Curious if other people have better ideas especially on how to patch boots. Boots leak the worst I find. Spiderweb cracking of rubber wherever it flexes--ankle area. 

 

 

I just return them to Beans for another pair or a heavy discount

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5 mins ago, GuiltyAsCharged said:

I just return them to Beans for another pair or a heavy discount

When was the last time you did this? I tried that a year ago. I was told: 1) mail them in at your cost 2) wait for them to be reviewed ~4-6 weeks 3) get new pair OR get "defective" pair returned to you at your cost. 

 

Also, I feel like if I'm getting three seasons out of waders that was worth the cost although they are a little more expensive than I'd like, considering how cheap the boots on these things are. They are raelly crappy. 

 

But my main point is they can be repaird pretty easily and well. But it's best to do repair like a huge part of the wader rather than go leak by leak. Leak by leak is a huge waste of time and even leads to more leaks. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

5 mins ago, JButts said:

When was the last time you did this? I tried that a year ago. I was told: 1) mail them in at your cost 2) wait for them to be reviewed ~4-6 weeks 3) get new pair OR get "defective" pair returned to you at your cost. 

 

Also, I feel like if I'm getting three seasons out of waders that was worth the cost although they are a little more expensive than I'd like, considering how cheap the boots on these things are. They are raelly crappy. 

 

But my main point is they can be repaird pretty easily and well. But it's best to do repair like a huge part of the wader rather than go leak by leak. Leak by leak is a huge waste of time and even leads to more leaks. 

It's a 15 minute drive. Sometimes they say where is it leaking and try to find the leak. I say have at it, but I need them for tonight. Usually they just get you a new pair or at their cost. Doesn't work now if they are 2-3 years old, but my waders always start leaking halfway through the season.

Edited by GuiltyAsCharged

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Keep in mind that waders that leak beyond repair make the perfect pair of waterproof bibs for a boat, or whatever else you need true waterproof rain pants for.  Just cut off the sock foot (or don't)

 

      few pin hole leaks won't matter in the rain.... only when submerged

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One thing I'm saying is that a lot of these leaks can be fixed, prevented, and avoided with a program of careful but also frugal preventitive patching. 

 

This is better than relying on the handshake satisfaction guarantee of LL Bean which no longer works if you are not near a store, as far as I can tell. 

 

Another problem is finding leaks. A lot of leaks turn out to be coming in the boots not the wader pants. But until you make this realizaiton, you will search in vain for leaky parts of the pants. 

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Most of the leaks I encountered have been in the area were the boot is joined to the wader for both stocking foot and boot foot waders.

 

 

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2 mins ago, Slaptail said:

Most of the leaks I encountered have been in the area were the boot is joined to the wader for both stocking foot and boot foot waders.

 

 

Not most in my case, ALL of them on my bootfoots.  

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