Slowpoke Kid

Set up recommendation for a person with disability

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Hello everyone,

 

I recently got diagnosed with a neurological disease with, among other things, cause my right hand to be very slow.  On my last fishing trip, my hand was so slow that I constantly get snatched up on the rocks along the jetties because I can't reel in the line fast enough.

 

I don't get to go fishing often before because of my job, but at the rate of my disease progress, I might find myself unemployed soon and need to look for a new job that I can do with my medical condition.  It means that I might have a lot more free time to go fishing.  I find fishing very therapeutic and don't want to give fishing even if I am not good at it. 

 

I fish on shore (beach, jetties, pier).  I am looking for recommendations for a new setup, I am willing to spend more money for quality gear to make up for my disability.  I am  thinking about getting a really surf rod and reel that can do well on the pier.  I mostly bait fish before, but I want to get into artificial lures.

 

Please help me choose a quality setup.  I am willing to spend time $500 or more.  Thank you.

 

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I’m sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis, but it’s great that you’re still committed to fishing. There are many options out there, and you can get a nice setup for $500. They make a high speed model of the penn slammer III that can help with the issue of not being able to reel fast enough. Add in an appropriately sized tsunami airwave (~$150) and you have a nice setup in your price range.

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This might be a good resource for you to refer to when purchasing some adaptive equipment.

https://www.disabledsportsusa.org/sports/adaptive-equipment/fishing-equipment/

 

Not sure what your disease is, but I remember OTW had something that was a rod/reel combo that you could manage with a single hand, designed specifically for a person with a disability.

 

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1 hour ago, C.Robin said:

I’m sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis, but it’s great that you’re still committed to fishing. There are many options out there, and you can get a nice setup for $500. They make a high speed model of the penn slammer III that can help with the issue of not being able to reel fast enough. Add in an appropriately sized tsunami airwave (~$150) and you have a nice setup in your price range.

I agree. I'm glad that you are out there fishing. It truly is one of the best medicines you can have. 

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I feel for you, as we have a 27 yr old son with many disabilities. I’m going to be realistic, all the quality and new gear in the world is not going make your body work any differently. It will not “ make up for my disability “ If you feel that you can surfcast, then your condition can’t be too bad, and lightweight gear may indeed benefit you. If your condition worsens, you can consider charters and party boats to get your fix. Best of luck.

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I know both Shimano and Daiwa make electric retrieve reels, but very little else about them. Those might be meant for use on boats, I really don't know much more. Worth looking into!

 

Good luck, perseverance is a reward in itself. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Stick to the beach keep it simple. You can try fishing conventional and reel in with your left hand. Some very good reels and rods 500 is a good budget. Stick around this place there’s a buy and sell forum once you get some time you can buy and sell. You can find some used higher end gear for better prices in very good condition.  

Edited by hydraman

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4 hours ago, Slowpoke Kid said:

Hello everyone,

 

I recently got diagnosed with a neurological disease with, among other things, cause my right hand to be very slow.  On my last fishing trip, my hand was so slow that I constantly get snatched up on the rocks along the jetties because I can't reel in the line fast enough.

 

I don't get to go fishing often before because of my job, but at the rate of my disease progress, I might find myself unemployed soon and need to look for a new job that I can do with my medical condition.  It means that I might have a lot more free time to go fishing.  I find fishing very therapeutic and don't want to give fishing even if I am not good at it. 

 

I fish on shore (beach, jetties, pier).  I am looking for recommendations for a new setup, I am willing to spend more money for quality gear to make up for my disability.  I am  thinking about getting a really surf rod and reel that can do well on the pier.  I mostly bait fish before, but I want to get into artificial lures.

 

Please help me choose a quality setup.  I am willing to spend time $500 or more.  Thank you.

 

Welcome to the site slowpoke. I too suffer from a neurological disease that mostly effects my legs so I understand where you're coming from. I haven't fished in many years because of my disease, I'm also quite a bit older than you I believe. The first thing I suggest is listen to what others suggest and use common sense. What I did the last few years I fished was go light, ultra light. I fished from a boat so that was easy. I used a 7' ultra lite St Croix Surf rod and either a Stradic 2500 or a Stradic 3000, I found the Stradic 4000 to be too heavy and tired me too quickly. 95% of my fishing was with 9" sluggos. Easily caught stripers up to 41" with that set up. Hope I helped and good luck.

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Thank you everyone for the kind response.  I am 36 years old this year and I have Parkinson's disease.  It's very rare for someone my age.  Right now I can still do many things, however, it is scary when I think about the symptoms of people who are at more advanced stages of this terrible disease.  

 

I want to go out and enjoy fishing as much as as I can before the disease get worse.   This is why I am willing to spend more money so I can enjoy my favorite outdoor activity.  

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Posted (edited) · Report post

 

Start fishing docks in a lake and make sure you're wearing a life vest.

The outfit is a little over budget. You can try the second one too.

 

 

Edited by SandSpike1

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18 mins ago, Slowpoke Kid said:

Thank you everyone for the kind response.  I am 36 years old this year and I have Parkinson's disease.  It's very rare for someone my age.  Right now I can still do many things, however, it is scary when I think about the symptoms of people who are at more advanced stages of this terrible disease.  

 

I want to go out and enjoy fishing as much as as I can before the disease get worse.   This is why I am willing to spend more money so I can enjoy my favorite outdoor activity.  

I was right, you are much younger than me, you're even younger than my kids.. Are you married or have someone who can help you get out?

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What is your location slowpoke? A fishing partner also might help. Lots of guys around here. Let us know and good luck with everything. I’m jus a couple of years older than you and always willing to give a hand to a fellow fisherman. 

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2 hours ago, hydraman said:

What is your location slowpoke? A fishing partner also might help. Lots of guys around here. Let us know and good luck with everything. I’m jus a couple of years older than you and always willing to give a hand to a fellow fisherman. 

Thank you for the offer.  I am currently going to school in Monterey, CA.  I should graduate in December, after that I either go to DC area, Houston, or McAllen, TX, depending on whether or not I find a job in those area. 

 

I am originally from Houston.  I joined the Navy and have been traveling around the world for the past 12 years. I am still in the military, currently waiting to find out if they want to keep me around or not because of my disease.  I am married and have 2 young ones.  My wife is very supportive of me going fishing for therapy.

 

Oh, just to clarify, my disability is mild right now, but expected to get worse later, just don't know when.

 

Thank you.

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Slowpoke:

 

While not as bad as Parkinson's in terms of speed of progression, I have Entrapped Nerve (exiting the Lumbar and Cervical Spine) Sensory and Motor Peripheral Polyneuropathy, which affects my arm and leg function.  As regards my hand function, my solution is to have, for a given fishing rod type (for example, a 10 -10.5 ft rod rated 1-4oz) three different setups - left hand retrieve spinning, left hand retrieve conventional and right hand retrieve conventional. I have not yet had a need for right hand retrieve spinning...I take a lot of S*** from people for carrying so many outfits in my Buggy, but my friends know why I do it. 

 

To accommodate the leg sensory/motor issues, I stick to "solid ground fishing" from the shore, i.e., flat locations along the Point Pleasant Canal, Piers jutting into the Barnegat Bay, and the beach.  On the beach, I never wade in, as I learned the hard way that lacking sensation of the ground in your feet does not lend itself to recovery after being hit by a wave any higher than mid-calf.  I do wade in behind IBSP, but I converted a ski pole to a wadding staff to prevent stepping in the wrong area.  I find that this is therapeutic for my constant leg pain, and the water pressure reduces the edema that is a side effect of the anti-spasmodic Rx I am on.

 

Since 2005, I have learned to Long Cast from the flat sand, only going down the sloped sand to release a fish.  Also, my shortest surf rod is 10.5 feet, and all my surf rods have a stout butt that doubles as a cane, and a hook keeper for the lure when I use the rod as such (prevents snagging the leg). I find that Carbon Fiber Blanks provide the best but configuration for my needs, as they have a high strength to diameter ratio, as compared to graphite or graphite composite.  Rods/Blanks I use that are still in production are ZZiplex, Century (Slingshot Series), and Shimano Tiralejo.  I'm sure there are others suitable for my "dual use", but I only make recommendations based on personal use.  I find the Century and Shimano rods to be light enough in the hand for plugging, as well.

 

In terms of spinning reels, I have found that the Daiwa BG (4000 and 5000 only), Shimano Ultegra and Van Staal VR series are light enough to allow for sufficient time plugging before I have to change the loading on my right hand.  I divested myself of all my comparatively heavy Penn and Van Staal VS series reels, as my hand would go numb very quickly, and I can no longer feel braid in the dark, so manual pickups have been replaced by Manual Close Bails. Note that although the Ultegra's have a slow to super slow oscillation, their line pickup per handle turn is significant.

 

In terms of conventional reels, I use the Shimano Calcutta B and Cardiff (left Hand retrieve) level wind reels, and the Daiwa Millionaire Tournament M7HT Mag Surf Reel.  Not sure of the Shimano retrieve ratios, but the Daiwa is 5.8 - 1.

 

Some final tips - reduce your plugs to one belly hook and one tail hook - I currently use a treble on the belly and a single Siwash or Inline hook on the tail, and a single hook on all my metals.  I have also, for years, crushed all my barbs right out of the package ( artificial and bait hooks), as I stick myself with hooks with a frequency that would be perhaps alarming to others.  Also, it is extremely important to stay current with your tetanus shots.

 

Hope this helps.

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A higher geared reel would help get your rig up a little quicker. What is your current setup?  

 

 

Another component to consider is that if your on medication for your PD, there will likely be a window when your movement is optimal. Perhaps try to time fishing and other physical activities around that. You may also not be thinking meds yet as your symptoms may not warrant it. 

 

Im also curious of your location.  Theres a lot of gear heads on here to hopefully help guide you to a more advantageous setup.

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