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Boater-Shore Angler Etiquette

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31 mins ago, Portland Bill said:

 the boat guy wins every time

Not every time. Only if you walk away with your tail between your legs. 

50% of the boaters will move after you yell to them,

90% out of the remaining 50% will move after first warning shots that you lend in front or to the side of them.

99% of the remaining 10% will leave after you snag their lines with your jigs.

And only 1% of the remaining 10 would be that hard headed idiot who just won't budge until he gets it in the hull. 

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Why not stand your ground and fish just as you were, but be mindful of your cast? The last thing I ever want to do while fishing is waste fishing time. We've all been in this situation with the boater encroaching on our spot. It flat out sucks, especially since there is so much ocean to go around. I've wanted to chuck sinkers at boats, I won't lie about that, but then I also wouldn't want to waste my fishing time on some jack*** boater who doesn't get etiquette.

 

My favorite thing to do is to keep fishing and be mindful of that boater's line. Chances are if the boater is coming that close to a jetty or beach, he's either a really bad fisherman or really is desperate. I've already established it's someone I wouldn't care to have a conversation with. With that, I watch my line, watch his line, and stand my ground. If they don't leave, then I keep fishing.  

 

Work around the boater, catch a fish in his/her face, and maybe keep the sinker chucking to thoughts only; not ones to be acted on. Flex your muscles in an intelligent way. 

 

If all else fails, aim for the motors. Nothing sucks more than braid around lines, hoses, and a prop. Once you've connected, yank like you're setting the hook on a tarpon. That'll really dig in the braid.  :rav:                (just kidding for those who don't get it)  

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I've been on both sides of this.   When in a boat, I never go near any shore fisherman, jettys, etc.  First of all, one bad wave or wake and you are now a shore fisherman.

 

If I am on shore/jetty and some numbnutz who can't fish decides to pull up too close, I'll typically yell  "fish are in tight, you should see them all just under the surface".  Typically they will either get my sarcasm or they are dumb enough to actually come in closer.  

 

I do agree, jetskis are the WORST!  Lost a monster Jack Crevalle in FL several years back to a stooge who  was literally watching me real it in then wanted to get a closer look and drove right over my line

 

C

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I must admit i'm thinking more about what often happens to me is when a commercial netter or potter comes along and drops a net or a string of pots along the shore 30 yards out.  Usually ends up in a shouting match and "i'm only trying to make a living" type remarks (yeh, the pimp and the pusher on my street corner say the same - and gets the same reply - f off somewhere else!).  Even more infuriating is turning up after dark or in the early hours and casting and losing a couple of lures and even a fish before realising that a bl**dy net's been set 30 yards out!

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what about the boaters navigating an inlet that wrap around the jetty like a dime rather than stay in the channel....

 

or a certain long island western facing SS inlet where the "fleet" of party boats will come in where you are wading after pulling in a 11" fluke 

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1 hour ago, misha said:

Not every time. Only if you walk away with your tail between your legs. 

50% of the boaters will move after you yell to them,

90% out of the remaining 50% will move after first warning shots that you lend in front or to the side of them.

99% of the remaining 10% will leave after you snag their lines with your jigs.

And only 1% of the remaining 10 would be that hard headed idiot who just won't budge until he gets it in the hull. 

You've got some time invested in this, huh? Do you have a logbook?

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General rule of thumb for me is if I'm fishing a dock or pier or popular area with shoreline access from a boat, and someone walks in to fish, I'll move or lay off even though I "got there first."  You've got more options with a boat so why be an a_hole?  At the very least, boaters (to include yakkers) should lay off double the casting distance from any shore fisherman.  Only exception is navigating a narrow channel.  In that case, common courtesy usually means coming off plane to give the shore fisherman the chance to pull in his gear, then proceed slowly as far off the shore as you safely can until you're clear.  It amazes me just how ignorant and selfish people are both on boats and on the shoreline as far as the rules of the road, general etiquette and courtesy these days.  Don't even get me started on the yahoos who anchor up in busy marked channels or shore bound noobs who throw their rigs across busy navigable waterways and think that constitutes Title, not to mention the dopes who throttle down but squat their boats throwing a huge wake and think they're doing you a favor. 

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8 mins ago, bmac said:

General rule of thumb for me is if I'm fishing a dock or pier or popular area with shoreline access from a boat, and someone walks in to fish, I'll move or lay off even though I "got there first."  You've got more options with a boat so why be an a_hole?  At the very least, boaters (to include yakkers) should lay off double the casting distance from any shore fisherman.  Only exception is navigating a narrow channel.  In that case, common courtesy usually means coming off plane to give the shore fisherman the chance to pull in his gear, then proceed slowly as far off the shore as you safely can until you're clear.  It amazes me just how ignorant and selfish people are both on boats and on the shoreline as far as the rules of the road, general etiquette and courtesy these days.  Don't even get me started on the yahoos who anchor up in busy marked channels or shore bound noobs who throw their rigs across busy navigable waterways and think that constitutes Title, not to mention the dopes who throttle down but squat their boats throwing a huge wake and think they're doing you a favor. 

 

That's funny stuff about the plane/offplane wake stuff. I behave similar on the beach. When surfers show up I'll move out of their way as I can fish whole beach but they only have a tiny area to surf in. Some surfers though prefer to not wait for the courtesy and when they see you fishing their break they will come up behind you and launch into the water right next to you to show you disrespect, signal they want you to get lost. 

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5 hours ago, misha said:

You can stay whenever you want. But next time you on your boat - remember what people say in this thread.

Easy Misha, easy

My point , exactly. No need to go on the jetty. People get slammed just being in this thread.

 

You need to read posts again to see who is having a boat.

LOL

 

 

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17 hours ago, Beastly Backlash said:

 

Agreed, playing beam lead is just not smart if you value fishing, you can't fish if you are in prison.

 

But, if you are actively fishing and an accident happens because some boater went in front of you while you were casting, that is the boaters fault for putting themselves in harms way.

I suspect that you failed Torts class in law school.

 

If a person engages in conduct that a reasonably prudent person should understand could cause injury to another, that person will be held liable for the injuries that result.  Injuring a boater with a cast lure/sinker because the boater happened to venture i9nto your casting range is no more excusable than running someone over rather than stopping when they cross against the light.

 

In most states, including New York, there is a comparative negligence standard, which would allow a jury to allocate blame between the tortfeasor and the injured party,.  But I'd have to be on the defense side of that claim, when my client was asked whether he could have just refrained from casting at or near the boat in which the injury occurred.

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5 hours ago, bmac said:

General rule of thumb for me is if I'm fishing a dock or pier or popular area with shoreline access from a boat, and someone walks in to fish, I'll move or lay off even though I "got there first."  You've got more options with a boat so why be an a_hole?  At the very least, boaters (to include yakkers) should lay off double the casting distance from any shore fisherman.  Only exception is navigating a narrow channel.  In that case, common courtesy usually means coming off plane to give the shore fisherman the chance to pull in his gear, then proceed slowly as far off the shore as you safely can until you're clear.  It amazes me just how ignorant and selfish people are both on boats and on the shoreline as far as the rules of the road, general etiquette and courtesy these days.  Don't even get me started on the yahoos who anchor up in busy marked channels or shore bound noobs who throw their rigs across busy navigable waterways and think that constitutes Title, not to mention the dopes who throttle down but squat their boats throwing a huge wake and think they're doing you a favor. 

This tends to be my approach to life.  I run a boat, so I'll give the surf folks room, because they're stuck on the beach while I have other options.

 

But as you noted, the exception to that is a marked channel.  That's my road, and folks ought not to play in the road; if they do, they have an obligation to stay clear of traffic and not interfere with free transit of the channel.  Yes, it's good to back off the throttle and not wake the folks in the water, but when you're running an inlet, you're generally not looking at who's on the beach; you're trying to pick up the next set of buoys, looking for breakers if the inlet is rough, looking for boats that might pose a collision risk, etc.,  

 

And as you note, the boats fishing in the channel can be very problematic.  Was running a narrow section in my local inlet a couple of weeks ago, with shoals on both sides.  An outboard decided to drift for fluke right at a turn, with the drift perpendicular to the inlet.  I chose to drop my throttle to dead slow, and pass fairly close by the boat on the up-drift side, because if I passed on the other side, the slot was narrow enough that the boat could have drifted into me if I passed by too closely, while if I gave it what I was sure was enough room, I could have ended up on a sandbar (which is a particularly bad outcome when you have inboards).  The guys in the boat started yelling "Thanks" after I passed them, so I wouldn't be surprised if I picked up a like or two, but if it's a choice between cutting a line or running aground, the line is going to lose every time.

 

 

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On 8/13/2019 at 4:52 PM, Theseeker66 said:

While i do agree it's not smart,  there isn't a way to handle it properly.  Few weeks ago a guy lost $1000 plus dollar setup to a boat.  He's sol, the boat is effectively gone forever.  

No recourse for the surfcaster,  boat guys get away with whatever. 

Even if it's only losing your braid, that happens a few times people start taking matters into their own hands.

I’m assuming the $1000 loss was an idiot throwing his plug at the boat, hooked up and his drag was to tight so pole ripped out of his hands and into the water. If so good I’m glad he lost his set up. Don’t throw at boats, it’s stupid and you can really injure someone 

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2 hours ago, CWitek said:

I suspect that you failed Torts class in law school.

 

If a person engages in conduct that a reasonably prudent person should understand could cause injury to another, that person will be held liable for the injuries that result.  Injuring a boater with a cast lure/sinker because the boater happened to venture i9nto your casting range is no more excusable than running someone over rather than stopping when they cross against the light.

 

In most states, including New York, there is a comparative negligence standard, which would allow a jury to allocate blame between the tortfeasor and the injured party,.  But I'd have to be on the defense side of that claim, when my client was asked whether he could have just refrained from casting at or near the boat in which the injury occurred.

 

I guess I stand corrected.

 

It seems like boaters pretty much have the right of way.

 

Boat anglers can fish on top of shore anglers and if the shore angler attempts to continue fishing and they accidently hit the boater or accidently damage the boat with a cast then it is the shore angler's fault and the shore angler can be held liable for injuries to person and damages to property.

 

Is my understanding correct?

Edited by Beastly Backlash

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