John O'

Hummingbird feeders.

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We've got a ton... 12-20?... going through 20 oz. 3-1 sugar water a day... in 2 feeders... pretty neat seeing 8 or so trying to get to 4 petals...

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55 mins ago, Malsow said:

A few years ago I had a hummingbird moth hanging around my butterfly bush. Those are real cool if you've never seen one.

 

 

20190813_201113.jpg

AKA hawk moth

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Some feeders don't have a perch for the birds to sit on while feeding.  Get one that does have a place for them to rest while feeding.  They burn up a lot of energy flying.

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1 min ago, clambellies said:

Some feeders don't have a perch for the birds to sit on while feeding.  Get one that does have a place for them to rest while feeding.  They burn up a lot of energy flying.

 

I've got one of each up. Surprisingly (to me) they seem to feed at the one without the perch more often. Makes no sense to me. Could be the feeder color I guess, the non-perched one is solid red and the perched one has yellow swirls throughout the glass.  

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14 hours ago, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

They battle over my two feeders,they are vicious chasing each other around. 

One perches on the clothes line to see when the others feed they goes after them.

The chasing is mostly a male/female thing. Take a look at the coloring differences, the next time you see it happening. The males (brighter colored) are usually chasing the females. Go figure.

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A couple of things to keep an eye on are ants and bees.

Depending on where you hang the feeders, ants will find them if they're hungry.

I have mine on a clothes line between the back of the house near the door and a nearby tree.

The ants use the line as a trail from the tree to the house and had fed on the nectar in dry season.

 

Bees and yellow jackets will feed there as well, but only if there are no flowers around.

Dry summers mean fewer flowers, so we see more bees and birds.

One season, 2-3 years back, it was a drought season most of the summer, so there were fewer flowers for the bees to feed from. They mobbed, and I mean MOBBED the feeders in the hundreds. It got to the point where I was filling them daily. Finally, in an attempt to let the birds back into the mix I put out paper bowls filled with sugar water.

Now I knew what a swarm looked like! I figure that someone probably had a hive nearby and with honey bees being a big issue, I wanted to make sure that they could find some kind of food.

 

Haven't had that kind of gathering since.

 

The funniest thing was that you could walk right in the mix without getting stung/bothered.

Put a little puddle in your hand and they would drink from it. (It would tickle when they drank.)

Even the yellow jackets were cooperative. 

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On 8/14/2019 at 10:11 AM, clambellies said:

Some feeders don't have a perch for the birds to sit on while feeding.  Get one that does have a place for them to rest while feeding.  They burn up a lot of energy flying.

One hummingbird that regularly feeds at our feeders is always a sitter. Stops to eat. It's the only one as the rest just hover and eat. Pretty interesting behavior.

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I saw a hummingbird in the "wild" last year for the first time during turkey season.

It was pre-dawn and I heard something in the bush above me buzzing loudly.   I looked up and saw it buzzing around what must have been honeysuckle.

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On 8/13/2019 at 3:51 PM, Dieseldog13 said:

    Spent 18 summers on a lake in central Maine. Every year we put out a hummingbird feeder that was hung with a loop of mono. One day I look out and see a hummer had its head stuck in the mono loop. I carefully got him free but he was limp and did not seem to be breathing. My wife placed the tiny bird in her palm and very gentle pumped his chest. Soon he showed signs of life and 5 minutes later he flew off. I then hung the feeder with a single strand of mono.

Bev should have been a nurse!

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On 8/13/2019 at 0:43 PM, b-ware said:

We put them out around the middle of May, they usually last no more than 2 weeks and the bears walk off with them...……...

Same here, not worth the trouble.

 

But when the wife's gardens start blooming, we get a bunch of them.

 

Humming.jpg.0f73f3db1b66bba33ef94b424a5d95b8.jpg

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