Rockawayjb

Kayak Recovery Drills

4 posts in this topic

I finally completed drills to right and get back in my outback. I foolishly waited over 2 years to do these drills. A friend and I went to a calm area that was deep enough for realistic recovery drills.  We basically stripped our kayaks down to nothing - seat, tethered drive, and paddle.  We started by taking turns getting out and then just getting back in.  One person stayed in their kayak while the other was in the water just in case a boat got away. We did this 3-4x each.  Next, we moved to shallower water to turn the kayak over and then push it out into deeper water.  Once over our heads, we practiced turning the boat back over and getting back in.  2x was enough for me.  Despite being really tired, we geared up and headed out for some fluke. I got one 17.5 and then the wind and tide picked up.

 

I learned a lot from these drills. It would be very difficult to get in the boat on the fishfinder side with the kayak fully rigged.  Even without the finder, the mounting ball got caught on my shorts causing me to fall back into the water.  I have a small handle attached to my rudder that I got hung up on as well.  It got bent.  

 

I think the most important thing to me about these drills was gaining the confidence that I could get back in the boat if I had to, even if there was some nasty weather.  Being patient, resting when necessary, and of course, not panicking is key to survival in a bad situation. Not practicing this until now was idiotic, but I'm glad it's done. We'll be refreshing this skill every summer, and maybe even with the drysuit in the spring.

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Great idea! I need a refresher, and in less than ideal conditions too.  Dressed in a dry suit is part of my plan for this fall.

Edited by CharlieB

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13 hours ago, Rockawayjb said:

I finally completed drills to right and get back in my outback. I foolishly waited over 2 years to do these drills. A friend and I went to a calm area that was deep enough for realistic recovery drills.  We basically stripped our kayaks down to nothing - seat, tethered drive, and paddle.  We started by taking turns getting out and then just getting back in.  One person stayed in their kayak while the other was in the water just in case a boat got away. We did this 3-4x each.  Next, we moved to shallower water to turn the kayak over and then push it out into deeper water.  Once over our heads, we practiced turning the boat back over and getting back in.  2x was enough for me.  Despite being really tired, we geared up and headed out for some fluke. I got one 17.5 and then the wind and tide picked up.

 

I learned a lot from these drills. It would be very difficult to get in the boat on the fishfinder side with the kayak fully rigged.  Even without the finder, the mounting ball got caught on my shorts causing me to fall back into the water.  I have a small handle attached to my rudder that I got hung up on as well.  It got bent.  

 

I think the most important thing to me about these drills was gaining the confidence that I could get back in the boat if I had to, even if there was some nasty weather.  Being patient, resting when necessary, and of course, not panicking is key to survival in a bad situation. Not practicing this until now was idiotic, but I'm glad it's done. We'll be refreshing this skill every summer, and maybe even with the drysuit in the spring.

As a fitting line quoted from the movie "first man"
 
“We need to fail. We need to fail down here so we don’t fail up there,”

 

This is so true.... you need to fail in the shallows, when the time comes that you need to use that knowledge you gained, you'll be that much more prepared & know what you're up against

 

Well done! :th:

 

Now go practice the same in rougher, choppy water where it really counts....

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