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In between some axe work to split wood (gasp) (wheeze) I am snelling hooks.  First up are a bunch of blackfish hooks. Puppy drum and big drum next.

 

Never mind the claims that fluorocarbon is less visible.  I am not convinced it matters for blackfish or triggerfish or any other critter that sticks close to rocks; I don't think it matters for drum, either.

Abrasion resistance does matter ... so which is more abrasion resistant; the old hard Mason mono sold in 47" lengths, or fluorocarbon?  I think it's the Mason, but I'm not sure.

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Back to the axe, wheeze wheeze.  Now I see why serious boxers spend a lot of time chopping wood; shoulders, sixpack (not that I have one) and lower back. 

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I usually go to a heavier weight mono as leader in an abrasive underwater area...Normally I leader hooks with 30 pound test mono. So for fishing for Black fish I would leader the hooks with 50 pound test... And for Blue fish I leader the hooks with 100 pound test mono...

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50 lb. Mason mono has been my default snelling material for decades, for blackfish.  Bluefish don't concern me, I don't fish for them with bait, just jigs or plugs.  Tilefish, wreckfish, barrelfish, I'd go to 80 lb. leader material for the snell. 

 

OK, so there's enough of a consensus that I don't need to change my habits. 

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mason by far for abrasion resistance. agreed on fluoro not being needed for bottom fish. I think the bigger issue is those fish are feeding by scent more than sight, not like a tuna or striper.

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Now I have to figure out how to use a Du-Bro gadget I bought for snelling.  50 lb. I do by hand, 80 gets a little squirrely, and I have some 150 lb leader I want to snell to big circle hooks for drum.  The instructions make no sense.  Off to YouTube, I'm sure someone put a video together on one snelling gadget or another. 

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Mason more abrasion  resistance as is any hard type leader material !

Anything over 100 # if your doing a lot of hooks I would crimp , a few Snelling no big deal go with that !

I prefer eye up for Snelling  for most of my hooks , except for tile where circle seem to be the ticket in the depths .

Lighter leaders I would use 8-10 turns heavier 5-6  works Ok ! 

When Snelling use moderate tension wraps so when you pull leader they to tighten you don’t scrap  or heat leader , seat snell by tightening back end first .  

If memory serves Dubro tool was better for wire applications , but don’t quote me on that one , I do all mine by hand .

The tool I like for fancier knots is the aluminum tapered knot tool u see on internet once in awhile ! Very simple to use for nails or other big game smells !  

 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

What type & # line would you guys recommend for lightweight stuff, like kingfish and puffers? Maybe even porgies, triggers. etc

Edited by Sheisty

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There was an extended discussion of making rigs for red drum in the OBX/Hatteras Forum, awhile ago. The posters to whom other posters deferred were usually snelling their circle hooks and crimping a swivel on the other end of the snell (anywhere from 2" to 12" long).  I'm going to follow the lead of the apparent drum experts.

 

When last down in Buxton, I bought rigs from Red Drum, and those rigs were snelled also.  

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On 8/12/2019 at 0:39 PM, BrianBM said:

Back to the axe, wheeze wheeze.  Now I see why serious boxers spend a lot of time chopping wood; shoulders, sixpack (not that I have one) and lower back. 

I hope you are swinging a Fiskars x27. 

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Circle hooks must be able to obtain an initial stick, before it can then penetrate. The two best ways to tie circles on are snell and loop. Snell cocks the hook and that presents the tip in an aggressive posture, where it obtains the stick easily and quickly. Loops allow the hook freedom to move and that also works to obtain that initial stick.

 

You are using heavy mono, which when snelled might make the hook too stiff and rigid. Go with loop knots or crimped loops.

Edited by FishinMortician

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18 hours ago, Maine Guide said:

I hope you are swinging a Fiskars x27. 

Close, Fiskars X25.  I like it. 

 

9 hours ago, FishinMortician said:

Circle hooks must be able to obtain an initial stick, before it can then penetrate. The two best ways to tie circles on are snell and loop. Snell cocks the hook and that presents the tip in an aggressive posture, where it obtains the stick easily and quickly. Loops allow the hook freedom to move and that also works to obtain that initial stick.

 

You are using heavy mono, which when snelled might make the hook too stiff and rigid. Go with loop knots or crimped loops.

On the smaller hooks, I'm snelling with 80 lb.  On the 10/0, I will snell with 80 or 150, if my fingers can manage it. For drum, the snells are short, and a crimped loop at the far end should allow adequate movement. 

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