RevPDP

Backlash on Strong Casts?

Rate this topic

22 posts in this topic

Hello y’all.  I’m posting this here since my problem is achieving distance with my baitcaster.  I'm not new to baitcasters, so I'm a little befuddled with this new combo I'm breaking in (Calcutta Conquest 400 & 7'10" rod, 30# Samurai braid). I'm using this combo in South Florida's inlets for snook, etc., but it is basically a swim bait combo.  The bait is Live Target Mullet (1.5 oz.). I've adjusted the spool control knob and breaks according to standard. I can good casts with no backlash with moderate casts, and achieve moderate distance. The problem is when I really want to put some zip into the cast to get some extra distance. The extra zing gets me nasty backlash early on in the cast cycle. I've tried tightening the spool control knob but with limited success. Yes it'll stop the backlash, but it also limits the casting distance. I do use my thumb to "feather" the spool, but it is not that well trained. Is there a remedy to this other than more practice? Someone mentioned they thought my line diameter was too small for the heavy baits I intend to cast (1-3oz). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don’t see a problem with your setup. I use a similar setup in the gulf for the same and greater weights. Until you get your thumb better trained, your best recourse is to use a more progressive power cast, one that starts slow and builds until the release. Snap casts will virtually always create problems. Your better off setting your gear up for the longest controlled power cast. You can protect yourself from the birds nests by establishing your best cast and maybe adding another 20 yards or so of line and applying a strip of painters tape across your spool. The tape prevents the over run. As you increase your confidence change the position of the tape until you can remove it altogether. It’s very effective for developing better cast control without the worry of line replacement after a nasty birds nest. Above all though, practice and train that thumb to eliminate the need for the tape!

 

The only other way to address this problem is to add magnets or mag strength if you already have magnetic cast control. If you don’t want to go that route then use heavier viscosity oil like 3in1 sewing machine oil, replacement of your rod with a longer rod, replacement of the current brakes with heavier weights (easy to do with some brands like Shimano, like the red for green brakes they sell), or lastly, go with a thicker line. All of these will ultimately reduce your distance (except for the rod and brake replacement) but will help maintain your cast control. 

 

Give these methods a try! One is bound to help you achieve your goals without the risk of reel over runs. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, RevPDP said:

Is there a remedy to this other than more practice?

This is not a distance casting outfit. :)

I bought a used surf rod.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Loosen the spool a bit, start with full 8 pins brakes engaged and work your way down. If that doesn’t work, I would use 15lb braid for the lure you’re using. Don’t overfill the spool and use finger nails to thumb the sidewall of the spool.

good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Calcutta is a tough reel to blow up

Long and smooth through the release is key - just like hitting a golf ball with the driver

The short rod could be playing a role, certainly more difficult than a longer rod, especially if it's a fast action

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now I have three of the eight brakes on. I went all the way up and had them all on, and all the way down where I had only one on. The casting distance is virtually unchanged. Of course I had to use more thumb control with the lesser brakes.  Either way, I cannot get beyond 40 to 42 yards. When I really try to zip it out there, the overrun occurs midway through the cast, about 20-25 yards out. Does this make sense?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the idea Swimbaiter mentioned - put a piece of painters tape on the spool under the first 70 yards of line. That way the spool won’t blow up :idea:

 

As far as distance goes, try casting a 1 1/2oz sinker instead of the swim bait. Also as Swimbaiter mentioned, your casts need to be smooth and the acceleration steady - don’t gloss over that - it’s the solution to not blowing up your reel :) 

 

Lures with any kind of air resistance get harder to cast with conventional gear - a little breeze in the face makes it even harder - jerky or snap casting makes it close to impossible. 

 

TimS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you could try cleaning all oil off bearing and spool and go with a heavier grade lube it might just slow down the spool enough If you are in Florida the heat maybe making your current lube just to thin and the reel is running fast. I do this in new jersey with the season changes with my abu thicker oil in summer and thinner in fall and early spring   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

3 hours ago, TimS said:

I love the idea Swimbaiter mentioned - put a piece of painters tape on the spool under the first 70 yards of line. That way the spool won’t blow up :idea:

 

As far as distance goes, try casting a 1 1/2oz sinker instead of the swim bait. Also as Swimbaiter mentioned, your casts need to be smooth and the acceleration steady - don’t gloss over that - it’s the solution to not blowing up your reel :) 

 

Lures with any kind of air resistance get harder to cast with conventional gear - a little breeze in the face makes it even harder - jerky or snap casting makes it close to impossible. 

 

TimS

I was thinking about the air resistance of the lure as well...

If my overruns are occurring midway through cast, isn't that an indication that the lure is slowing down quite a bit?  Maybe this mullet does have too much drag? 

Edited by RevPDP
adding more info

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been contemplating the idea of using tape on the spool as was mentioned, however I have a few concerns.  First, what happens to the tape if I get a fish that strips out a lot of line? 

 

The other concern is more of me not understanding how that will prevent the overrun.  Say I place the tape 60 yards into my spool.  Right now my max cast is about 40-42 years.  When I really put some zing into the cast, the overrun is occurring about mid way into the cast, about 20 yards in.  How does the tape at 60yd. help with a backlash at 20? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RevPDP said:

I've been contemplating the idea of using tape on the spool as was mentioned, however I have a few concerns.  First, what happens to the tape if I get a fish that strips out a lot of line? 

 

The other concern is more of me not understanding how that will prevent the overrun.  Say I place the tape 60 yards into my spool.  Right now my max cast is about 40-42 years.  When I really put some zing into the cast, the overrun is occurring about mid way into the cast, about 20 yards in.  How does the tape at 60yd. help with a backlash at 20? 

The smaller the bulk of the spool the better, the brakes works effectively if there is less mass in the spool to stop. That is why I advise not to spool the line to much. you can try half spooling it and see if improves your distance. Now that I looked closely (& apologise) at your reel setup, I think its in the heavier side. I recommend a Daiwa coastal reel spoiled w/ 15-20lbs braid of your choice. Even the 50bucks Abu baitcaster will do the trick just wash it every outing and will serve you well.

Swimbaiter is spot on his suggestion ns but I rather half spool the reel than putting tape on it.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember, the key is to work from your best controlled cast then add your additional distance and the tape. If you have reservations about fishing with the tape on then you might want to just practice with the tape on the spool. I’d also practice with the casting weight I typically use most frequently while fishing. I have a series of different weight casting tennis balls that I work with when I’m practicing. I use screw-eye type bolts that I add washers to for the weights I need. Works great and is easy to assemble. I drill two starter holes for the bolt to pass through in the tennis ball. I also use a small section of thin cord I tie to the bolt eye to prevent wear on my line. You may want to plan on using a good heavy duty 30# braid which should cut through the air and wind well to maximize your distance. Don’t forget to use a good 12-18” mono shock leader between your main line and leader of at least 30# mono, I usually use 60# mono just to eliminate the risk of abrasive damage from creating break offs which typically occur with lighter duty shock leaders. Yeah I know, the rule of thumb is 10# per ounce of casting weight but when using light main lines, you’ll be replacing shock and main leaders way more often than you want to. At least this way you’re cutting your losses by half not having to replace your shock leader when you replace your main leader if you use a 60# shock leader regardless of the weight (weights less than 4 oz.). Don’t be afraid to use a barrel swivel also between your main line and your shock leader which I swear by. Eliminates another unnecessary knot from the system you don’t have to deal with. 

 

Well I hope some of this has helped a bit. Ask questions for clarification if needed. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try more brakes, less spool tension. I’m not familiar with the conquest but If possible cast when the LW is in the middle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try a more aerodynamic lure or plain lead weight of same weight 1.5oz . If it doesn't backlash like the mullet lure then the answer may be that the mullet is just not suited to extreme distance and lacks the aerodynamic design to achieve it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Second Update

Well I heeded the advice of several on here and removed the 30# Samurai.  I had some 50# J-Braid laying around, so I spooled the reel up half way just for kicks and giggles.  This morning I headed out to a nearby canal to test this theory.  I played with both the spool control and brakes, with heavy thumb and without, and still could not see any difference.  The longest cast was about 42 yards, with 38-39 being the average.  

 

Right now the spool tension is set a few clicks (2-3) looser than the recommended starting point, and I have 3 of the 8 brakes on.  I did try going up all the way with the brakes, as well as taking them all off.  The only noticeable difference was shorter casts when using maximum brakes.  Right now, I think this rules out the problem being thin line, no?  

 

The other option I see is to change the lure.  Maybe 1.5 oz mullet is catching too much wind and creating too much drag?  This afternoon I'll get back out there and try a standard 1.5 oz. bucktail jig.  

 

A last option would be to learn to cast. lol.  But really, maybe I need to remove all brakes and just practice training my thumb using Swimbaiters tape method...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.