JButts

Sick of Sawdust And Wood

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I've decided I don't like dealing with sawdust. I like making plugs, but I'm tired of sawdust. 

 

I want to make a go at using a 3-D printer and perhaps figuring out how to pour hard plastic plugs.

 

Have seen some on utube. 

 

Any thoughts?

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5 hours ago, JButts said:

I've decided I don't like dealing with sawdust. I like making plugs, but I'm tired of sawdust. 

 

I want to make a go at using a 3-D printer and perhaps figuring out how to pour hard plastic plugs.

 

Have seen some on utube. 

 

Any thoughts?

Unless you're willing to make peace with a lot of texture in your plugs, RP is not going to eliminate the dust problem...RP items usually take a goodbye bit of sanding to get a smooth surface.

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Thanks Kent. Well I have a lot to learn like what's RP mean? I could handle sanding 3-d blanks from which I would make molds to pour plastic. But if the sanding is extremely intense for the molded plastic plugs after coming out of the mold I would not be excited about that. 

 

While I like to experiment I really only have like 3 or 4 plugs that I use most of the time and would like to be able to duplicate in quantity. That's another reason to make a switch. I find it hard to duplicate my designs in wood. And it's hard to find decent wood...always have to adjust to what I can find.   

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I wonder if there are shops you can take a design to and ask them to make 20 lures or something from your blank? Someplace that could either 3-D print using a particular density plastic (like to replicate a wood type for a darter) or that could make a mold and pour plastic in differing densities.

 

Superstrikes cost $20. They last until you lose them. I'd be willing to spend that same money on like 20 spooks. 

 

Although it would be nice to be able to do most of this at home and keep experimenting with a variety of custom designs which is the part I like about plug making. 

 

Of course I also love the look of a wooden plug as it sits there after being sealed. But I don't like sawdust. Also tired of throughdrilling failures. 

Edited by JButts

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2 hours ago, JButts said:

 Also tired of throughdrilling failures. 

Do what I do. Drill the blanks before you spin them so you're just ruining lumber and not a turned plug.

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2 hours ago, JButts said:

Thanks Kima. I throughdrill first too. It's so hit and miss. One day I'll go 5/5 the next I net 2 useable blanks for 8 attempts. 

Hah, I've been there!  I have a couple of plugs that look like Swiss cheese because I was too stubborn to give up on the blank.

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9 hours ago, JButts said:

Thanks Kent. Well I have a lot to learn like what's RP mean? I could handle sanding 3-d blanks from which I would make molds to pour plastic. But if the sanding is extremely intense for the molded plastic plugs after coming out of the mold I would not be excited about that. 

 

While I like to experiment I really only have like 3 or 4 plugs that I use most of the time and would like to be able to duplicate in quantity. That's another reason to make a switch. I find it hard to duplicate my designs in wood. And it's hard to find decent wood...always have to adjust to what I can find.   

RP means "Rapid Prototyping". Essentially, there is a tradeoff between speed and surface quality. Because the parts are made by slicing the cad model into thin layers, and each layer is laid down sequentially, there is a slight step in the model for each layer, and the time it takes to make the model is dependent on how many steps there are, so if you have steps that are .005" thick, it takes more or less twice as long to produce than if the steps are .010 thick, but the .010 step model obviously will have a coarser surface than the model with .005 steps. The last time I looked, the maximum resolution was .002" thick steps, but nobody used it because it takes too long, which is a big deal because the shops that do this stuff charge by the hour of machine time. Most RP shops offer finished model services, where the model comes already sanded smooth but it's expensive. 

I saw a posting by a guy from the Netherlands who was printing GT poppers, and his plugs were simply left with the texture the machine produced. His weren't painted...the color came from the color of the plastic he used, and the texture didn't seem to be a problem. There are many plugs that are intentionally textured, and the fish probably don't distinguish one texture from another. Anyway, this seems to be a sensible approach, unless you just have to have a fancy paint job.

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Kent I really appreciate the explanation. I have seen some of the protos of models printed at the library and they exhibited the layering that you describe. I wouldn't really have a problem with sanding that down as that's the easiest part of a build for me although I guess it would require a mask and everything. That's why I'd like to get into pouring plastic in molds. That would be ideal. I see these great super strike poppers and darters and it's like why bother with maple or whatever when perfection once reached can be repeated without worrying about mother nature's changing ways in terms of different qualities of wood. 

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Look up acetone Treatments to get a smooth texture on 3D prints. the tube has some great examples using Acetone Vapor to achieve a gloss finish without the need to sand. Acetone will melt the surface of the plastic which is how the process works. I am in no way saving to do this as i would assume those vapors might not be the best to inhale :eek: and a fume vent or working outside should be used.

 

 

 

I have been looking into this a bit but have not thrown my money down to gear up or spend the time to learn the modeling software. Lots of possibilities to make masters for molds though.

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On 8/11/2019 at 6:18 PM, JButts said:

Thanks Kima. I throughdrill first too. It's so hit and miss. One day I'll go 5/5 the next I net 2 useable blanks for 8 attempts. 

It limits your loop placement

You really need to develop that through drilling skill

You can, I did. Had the same issues, did the drill first thing but decided it wasn't allowing me the options I was looking for.

I use the pin on the base of the drill press method, now I can't even remember the last time I missed on a through-drill

Lots of threads on it already so I'm not going to go into details, use the search

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^ What he said.

 

I have also had good success drilling after the plug is turned. Use a chuck and drill bit in the lathe to go from the front of the plug, and place the rear of the plug on the tailstock live center. Slowly slide the tailstock toward the headstock. The through hole sould line up great unless you hit a knot in the wood.

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I went by the library. They have two of these Ultimakers. On the rolling rack with the printer they had a bin of pieces--discards maybe or something. Lots of different shapes and textures. Interesting to feel the weight of them and see how the printer honeycombs things. Also was able to observer the texture of the layering. It seems totally acceptable to me, particularly if it could be sanded but even without sanding I don't think I would mind at all.

 

I wonder about whether these printers can make large watertight compartments that could be injected with water. Might require printing a plug in two halves and then removing the honeycombing from parts of it.  

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