FishermanTim

skeeters and EEE on the south shore

Rate this topic

32 posts in this topic

9 hours ago, alpha baiter said:

Pesticides have a bullseye on their back just look at the massive law suits with the Roundup (glyphosate) claims. I think municipalities don't want to have the liability. I also think the voting public especially in woke MA are opposed to wide spread sprays. 

I was talking to a doctor friend of mine when I was coaching a EEE "survivor". He had treated a young woman who did not survive, he said if people had any idea what this disease is like we'd be demanding DDT. I have beekeeper friends who are very anti spraying, I say nuke the bastids until you can get that British company over here to hit them with the gene approach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I gotta be honest, I don’t think I’ll be taking an unnecessary risk.   I was planning on crabbing and quahogging during the low tides at the end of this week.  Unless I can go hogging by boat, I’m not risking a walk through skeeter-infested woods.   Crabbing in low, muddy marshes doesn’t sound worth it, either.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited) · Report post

2 hours ago, stormy monday said:

I was talking to a doctor friend of mine when I was coaching a EEE "survivor". He had treated a young woman who did not survive, he said if people had any idea what this disease is like we'd be demanding DDT. I have beekeeper friends who are very anti spraying, I say nuke the bastids until you can get that British company over here to hit them with the gene approach.

I agree 100%. DDT probably the best and safest pesticide ever created. Saves millions of lives from mosquito borne illness. P.s. colony collapse is cyclical and most likely caused by a fungus not pesticides (neonicitinoids specifically). You don't need them from Britain in Florida they sterilize and release large amounts of male mosquitos......does a great job at reducing populations. 

Edited by alpha baiter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, exactly where do these mosquitos get EEE from?

Surely if it came from a domesticate animal (horse) they could find "patient zero" (as it were).

If it can come from other "wild" animals, maybe something can be done to remove the "typhoid-Marys" from the area???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some species of mosquitoes bite both mammals and birds.  The EEE virus typically gets picked up from mosquitoes biting asymptomatic infected birds.  It is usually first detected in cedar and other freshwater swamps where this species of mosquito is prevailent.  Mosquito Control every year treat these known swamps with bti (a bacteria designed to kill mosquito larvae). I believe that the mosquitoes mainly found in backyards are less likely to contain EEE (those that like standing water in your yard).  However, as more birds are infected later in the summer the higher the likelihood that the more common "backyard" human biting species start carrying it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're spraying again for either the 3rd or 4th time in two and half weeks tonight.   Will be loading the yak up in oh dark dirty tomorrow, must remember to spray before hand.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, FishermanTim said:

So, exactly where do these mosquitos get EEE from?

Surely if it came from a domesticate animal (horse) they could find "patient zero" (as it were).

If it can come from other "wild" animals, maybe something can be done to remove the "typhoid-Marys" from the area???

They say it's songbirds and crows mostly. Female mosquito takes her first blood meal from an infected bird, lays eggs, then takes her second blood meal, which is when she passes the infection. My personal goal is to find a link to plovers, that'll do it ;-) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/26/2019 at 9:56 PM, Jonesy02719 said:

I gotta be honest, I don’t think I’ll be taking an unnecessary risk.   I was planning on crabbing and quahogging during the low tides at the end of this week.  Unless I can go hogging by boat, I’m not risking a walk through skeeter-infested woods.   Crabbing in low, muddy marshes doesn’t sound worth it, either.

I was going to fish Sunday night from a beach on the cape. Says light winds under 5mph. Not going unless the wind is going to be 10+ now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, flylikabird said:

They're spraying again for either the 3rd or 4th time in two and half weeks tonight.   Will be loading the yak up in oh dark dirty tomorrow, must remember to spray before hand.   

Any idea where they are spraying?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a weird sci-fi story line, where a bird is infected with a disease with a horse-based name, gets bitten by a mosquito which transmits the disease to people.

 

If this is truly the case, which birds are getting infected and from where? Surely there must be some way to track the origin of this disease?

 

Of course, with the obvious success we've had in controlling ticks and Lyme disease, I wouldn't expect an answer soon....

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

also southern and western middlesex cty. the spraying in my own town two days ago got my attention. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do they test deer and horse flies as well? (Just curious if more than one type of biting insect can transmit it.)

 

Thankfully the daytime activity is low (for skeeters) and the population of dragonflies is quite high, so pretty much ANYTHING small enough for them to eat gets eaten.

 

Now if the bat population would rebound.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.