Kanine Kleenup

A couple Mackerel questions

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Mackerel are notoriously difficult to cast net, as Jean noted, they are lightning fast - they'll form a net sized hole in the school as soon as you throw the net :freak:   It's pretty amazing :)  

 

Much easier to catch on sabiki rigs or tiny jigs.  No, I've never eaten one but they make great bait for just about everything :)

 

TimS

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1 hour ago, Kanine Kleenup said:

1) anybody eat them? I like to smoke bluefish,  is the taste similar? 

2) can u catch them with a throw net at the canal?

thanks for any answers..

Could have gotten a bucket full at my feet last time down. 

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Fresh mac is an excellent tasting fish, even the small ones.  Filet them immediately and broil a trayful for a couple minutes and serve them at a party as appetizers and you'll have people fighting over them..  But, like bluefish, FRESH is key.

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6 mins ago, shuyak said:

Fresh mac is an excellent tasting fish, even the small ones.  Filet them immediately and broil a trayful for a couple minutes and serve them at a party as appetizers and you'll have people fighting over them..  But, like bluefish, FRESH is key.

^^This. The key is they have to be fresh before cooking, preferably within an hour of catching. I've only had them pan fried, but would really like to try them smoked. 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

They are ok to eat and as bob_G and others mentioned, have to be fresh. I have friends that can them and not bad but not my favorite way to eat them. Very salty. I say favorite but more tolerant of eating them smoked. Wife is Portuguese and a was common food source for them. Well, until I told her about the amount of PCB's and warnings on the same. I think that bluefin tuna is likely higher in PCBs though so would not avoid turn down a bite or meal if time was spent on cooking it. 

Edited by NHAngler
typo

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From New York south, mackerel are bait.  From Boston on north, they're food, or they used to be. As noted above, they need fussy handling, off the hook and into the slush ice, use promptly (as in "immediately, or smoke them the next day.") I like them as sushi; I like them broiled; there are plenty of ways to prepare them, mostly with either tomatoes or with citrus fruits. 

 

I miss the mackerel run that once existed off Long Island. 

 

They don't freeze well for human consumption. The captain who wrote a book on giant bluefin liked them as bait; he caught as many as he could, dunked them in cheap maple syrup to reduce dehydration and oxygen damage, and used a blast freezer immediately. That's not a tool that most of us have at home.

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3 hours ago, BrianBM said:

) I like them as sushi; I like them broiled; there are plenty of ways to prepare them, mostly with either tomatoes or with citrus fruits. 

 

I miss the mackerel run that once existed off Long Island. 

 

I miss those runs as well.

 

But just a word of caution, Atlantic mackerel are known to carry parasites than can be transmitted to humans. The fish need to be treated one of several ways to be really safe for human consumption uncooked.

 

Seems we’re getting a little run of Chubb mackerel in R.I. just now.

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