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Learning to diagnose and repair reels (mainly spinning)

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I see a lot of the guys on here know what parts cause a particular issue. Does that come with experience? Was wondering if repair shops would ever consider letting new people shadow or their work and learn from them?

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Disassemble a few, figure out what the parts do, and put it back together. While doing so, take a lot of pictures. I use notes on Iphone, you can take a photo in notes and add text to it. Read a few tutorials on relubing, and Join Alan Tani’s sight for advice if you get stuck. 

If you have a favorite brand, you are in luck, since most reel manufacturers do things a little different.

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Years of experience and learning by doing helps. As do reading and remembering different solutions posed by others. .

Parts lists and diagrams are an immense help. Proper quality and well fitting tools are required. Average Home Deport/Lowes tool just do not cut it. 

Web sites like SOL etc are a big help.

As for repair shops in Philadelphia except for Penn factory there are none left. Even tackle shops except for three left are no more".

Edited by george6308

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If you have a mechanical background or experience you can pick up on it pretty easy.  Reels have gears, bearings, springs washers, shims, etc. just like many other mechanical things.  Or as others said, buy a few broken reels on eBay or the local flea market and diagnose the problem, take it apart, order parts and repair.  It's the only way you can learn.

 

tony

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I started my "reel" experience converting a Penn 185 (no star drag) into a 180 in the waiting room at the Penn plant in the later 60's. Gave the receptionist a list of the needed parts gleaned from the catolog Penn included in their reel boxes. .Used the Penn reel tool and the rest is history. I still have the reel. Changed the handle to a 24-155, upgraded to HT-100 drag system, and added a 29-100L spool over time. It is stil a great  back bay reel.

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Thanks for the advice and input guys. I appreciate it. Just easier on the wallet to learn to do it myself rather than having to go to someone and service a bunch  of reels for a fee. Good skill set to have too. 

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Drag: Get a hold of two types of spinning reels. One type is driven by a main gear which is attached to the handle and drives another gear (pinion) with similar teeth. The other type is where the main gear (attached to handle, again) drives a "worm" gear which is hollow and has the axle (which the spool engages) moving laterally inside it as the worm gear spins around the axle, as the handle is cranked. Once you've seen both styles, you can adapt to other minor changes. Always check for shims whenever a part is removed so you don't lose them (don't ask me how I learned that). Some tools you must have are listed below.

 

micrometer

high quality screwdriver bit set having a 1/4 inch adapter for a ratchet wrench

penetrating oil

dentist's pick

order all shims found in a Michell 300

artist's paint brush about 3/4 inch wide bristles

white or yellow pipe cleaners

high quality 1/4 inch drive socket sets, metric and standard

utility knife razors

SOS steel wool containing soap

fine grit sandpaper 1500, 800 and 600 grit for WET sanding

strong flashlight to find the parts you drop on the floor

sedatives, for when you still can't find the parts

 

 

 

 

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On 8/6/2019 at 0:21 PM, PENN Fishing said:

If you have a mechanical background or experience you can pick up on it pretty easy.  Reels have gears, bearings, springs washers, shims, etc. just like many other mechanical things.  Or as others said, buy a few broken reels on eBay or the local flea market and diagnose the problem, take it apart, order parts and repair.  It's the only way you can learn.

 

tony

Pretty simple really.

Most issues are contaminated bearings.

Gears don’t wear out,at least not in our lifetime.

As others have said pay attention to the very thin shims when you take a reel apart. They are there for a reason,gear mesh,side play etc.

Have fun....

Edited by olvart

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