plugger 41

Following Sea

25 posts in this topic

If it gets bad where you may tumble you have to lay off the drive and grab the paddle to get through it. That's when you can easily roll a Hobie.....any Hobie...especially with a taller seat. Even a 1/2" higher in a Revo 13 makes a difference. It's one of the reasons why I canned the Vantage seat.

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5 hours ago, The Riddler said:

If it gets bad where you may tumble you have to lay off the drive and grab the paddle to get through it. That's when you can easily roll a Hobie.....any Hobie...especially with a taller seat. Even a 1/2" higher in a Revo 13 makes a difference. It's one of the reasons why I canned the Vantage seat.

I  agree 100%.  The only thing for me is the older seat kills my back. 

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7 hours ago, The Riddler said:

If it gets bad where you may tumble you have to lay off the drive and grab the paddle to get through it. That's when you can easily roll a Hobie.....any Hobie...especially with a taller seat. Even a 1/2" higher in a Revo 13 makes a difference. It's one of the reasons why I canned the Vantage seat.

I don't have a lot of experience with following seas.  Are you better to go straight with it or "jibe"  back and forth at an angle to the waves?  I got into it a little bit in my Tandem Island, we were surfing along and then the entire front of the boat went under a wave.  Scared the crap our of me.  In the TI with the amas, jibing seemed much more controllable then just going straight with it.  Just wondering how it works with a kayak?

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Transfer as much weight as possible to the back.

Take out drive and use paddle.

Lift rudder.

Legs over the sides.

Spend as much time on the back of the wave as possible ie. paddle like hell to keep on the back of the wave, then stop paddling and use blade for balance during the corkscrew and surf part of the wave.

Swear to never get caught in a following again.

 

The last time I've been caught was off Block Island and I put a couple of blues on shortish stringers on either side. Definately helped but was disconcerting to have the yak jerked back as it started down the face of every wave, did impede speed on the back of the wave ... press and cons I guess

 

 

Edited by Africaster

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Posted (edited) · Report post

In my opinion,

 

The problem is going straight and side ways in unfavorable conditions. Once the wave lifts the stern and the rudder hops out of the water even for a second that's when you go out of control. If you are on the drive without the rudder in the water the boat will naturally go side ways that's when the wave will push you over and it can happen easily.

 

Hobie hulls or any pedal kayak are not made to track like it's on rails.  We need to turn easily and fast. Trade-offs. The Adventure is the best out of the lot because it has some length but it is still vulnerable to tumbling in following seas.  Someone brought up the idea of larger rudder that is used on the Island package. I like that idea. I would think it would give you some lateral resistance. It can't hurt.

Edited by The Riddler

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Posted (edited) · Report post

Yap, Johnson Outdoors hit it out of the ball park with that P13 and then the soggy ass folks started whining and the fresh water crowd wanted to stand and bring 100lbs of gear to slam a 3lb LMB with 65lb braid on the deck with 4 camera rolling and a Large Dunkin Donuts ice in the other hand while doing a wind mill breakdance...and the choices for the salty dogs went down hill...and now we have this thread. :laugh:

Edited by The Riddler

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Just keep an eye on what’s following you,  and keep it all straight with the rudder and or paddle. If you have the toe straps on the pedals they help to keep you connected to the yak.

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Following seas or rough water is when I don't like pedal yaks so much, it is nice to have the paddle in your hand when you need to brace, but would not see a problem having it in one hand while travelling. My OK ultra 4.3 was very nice in following seas, my last kayak a 13' Slayer Propel , was a wider stern and seemed to be controlled more so by the waves, I have not encountered  a following sea in my new yak a Liquid Logic Manta Ray, which has a very pointy bow and stern,  shorter but still wide in middle, still won't be as nice as the OK......Jack

 

  

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I think hull design makes a big difference. My C-14 hates a following sea, or any sea for that matter, while my Scupper Pro (14') handles it well, because it was designed as a salt boat not a pond boat.

 

BTW, that nose diving on a surf is called "pearling" (spelling is debated so lets not go there). I was one on a friend's Hobie Cat when we went over that way. Not to mention a thousand times surfing on whitewater.  With a paddle what you do is brace to create drag so you don't slide down the wave. 

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Yes, the hull is important. The flattish Revo hull with the rudder swinging in the breeze can be sketchy. The Scupper Pro is known to be a good surf kayak. Isn’t the Scupper Pro closer to 15’?

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1 hour ago, cheech said:

Isn’t the Scupper Pro closer to 15’?

I guess it is, something like 14' 8".  I was thinking of taking it out today with forecasts over 10, but then they went higher and I chickened out. Of course they didn't hit the high numbers. What I really need to figure out on that boat is a good way to keep the cooler bag secure on the deck & hatch. It's so rounded it always slides off.

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If the boat broaches on the wave face, stick the paddle into the wave on the up-wave side with the blade horizontal and lean on it...you will side surf down the wave. This works even on breaking waves. If you brace on the down-wave side, you'll almost certainly capsize.

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