dbjpb

kayak safety

44 posts in this topic

Aqua-Bound BilgeMaster Pump

How many people take a pump with them on a normal trip ? It could save your life.  Perhaps the most over looked safety item.

Keep in mind we are floating around miles from shore on a thin piece of plastic ?   I suspect less then 10 % of the people bring one with them ? 

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i dont yet. but its in the mail. i will say, i kayak fished for 2 years without one. now that i got back into it and im a little more wise i bought one. its a piece of mind thing. also its like a snow blower. you hope you dont have to use it, buts its there when you need it. 

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If you have a leak in your hull that is so bad it require a pump because a sponge or cup can't keep up with it, then you aint gonna make it back to shore regardless. :laugh:

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I have a pump and some pool noodles in the hull. I paddle a Viking reload however and the center hatch does not open to the hull. Id have to pump from the bow, hopefully it never comes to that. 

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Goggle manual hand bilge pump, permanently mounted on boat,  hose to inside of hull 12gpm. I have not carried a pump yet but something  like this or something someone could make as kayak specific would be neat, opening a hatch to stick a pump in could be a big mistake when you are taking on water already. Having a pump mounted that would be easy to reach or even a port for the type pictured might be cool......Jack

 

ps: Come on Kinghong get on this!

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7 mins ago, Bulldog said:

Goggle manual hand bilge pump, permanently mounted on boat,  hose to inside of hull 12gpm. I have not carried a pump yet but something  like this or something someone could make as kayak specific would be neat, opening a hatch to stick a pump in could be a big mistake when you are taking on water already. Having a pump mounted that would be easy to reach or even a port for the type pictured might be cool......Jack

 

ps: Come on Kinghong get on this!

Googling now!

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Many touring kayakers carry a pump to empty out the cockpit after a capsize. A pump is a great idea to address a slow leak, or a leaky hatch on a SOT. I like a pump that will accept a length of hose to the suction side. In the event of a large split or catastrophic failure a radio or swimming skills may be more valuable.

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The Pump is nice but don't shy away from a manual bilge pump either installed inside with a one way plastic valve. Easy to do and put in a switch on your FF battery. Jim Sammons did a nice video on the Nocqua connector and a quick set up and he tested both.

 

 

 

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Cheap safety from nature. To check for leaks tie off a dry sponge and toss it below deck. Pull it topside to gauge any infiltration, or to clean up, cool off, etc.

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17 hours ago, Flip n Dip said:

If you have a leak in your hull that is so bad it require a pump because a sponge or cup can't keep up with it, then you aint gonna make it back to shore regardless. :laugh:

 

This ^^^^^^^

 

I question the sanity of people who venture far from shore in them.  I'll fish the bay and backwaters behind my house but vast open water, no thanks.  That's what real boats with real safety, navigation and communication equipment are for.

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18 hours ago, Flip n Dip said:

If you have a leak in your hull that is so bad it require a pump because a sponge or cup can't keep up with it, then you aint gonna make it back to shore regardless. :laugh:

Wrong.  Their are videos of people  getting back to shore after being miles out with a crack and it was all thanks to a bilge pump.

 

My pump is somewhere in my hull,  I want to secure it somewhere so in an emergency i dont loose time looking for it.  Or even worse be unable to get it.  Kayaks take awhile to sink completely so even if you're 80% submerged you stand a good chance to recover depending on water conditions.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

People in sea kayaks have been using hand pumps for years. They work well. Nothing works in every situation. If you develop a big hole while out in the water you are in trouble. Much more likely to happen in a power boat that struck some floating debris then in a kayak. I guess we could stay on land and surf fish to be safe. I think you are more  likely to get run over by a power boater then sink your Kayak from a big hole? Maybe if a shark mistakes the kayak for a seal? I think a whale caused  power boat to  flip over last year in NJ. That is some serious bad luck?

Edited by dbjpb

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