R.R. Bridge Fisher

Lead pot question

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My lead pot has a small hair line crack in it. After long use the lead will drip thru it. 

I'm wondering if i can put a small piece of steel or stainless over it and melt lead on top of piece of steel i put in there?

This is temporary until i find the right size pot for my old burner.

Thanks for any input provided......

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jb wield makes an extremeheat putty stick for temps to 2400*..they make another to 500* but I think your lead maybe higher then that.

 

they fill that gas tank ?...

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1 hour ago, capesams said:

jb wield makes an extremeheat putty stick for temps to 2400*..they make another to 500* but I think your lead maybe higher then that.

 

they fill that gas tank ?...

Thank you, I will look into that. I love the original j-b weld. 

The guy told me if I paint that tank he would fill it.  I painted it and It was looking new. I did one more pour its not shinny new and I'm waiting for the gas  to run out. 

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2 hours ago, capesams said:

I have that same set up....they won't touch the tank..to old they said and it's not tested...your lucky.

My Father in law gave it to me,i need to get it filled after one more pour.

How long does a full tank last you?

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19 hours ago, capesams said:

jb wield makes an extremeheat putty stick for temps to 2400*..they make another to 500* but I think your lead maybe higher then that.

 

they fill that gas tank ?...

Lead begins to melt around 630 degrees F.  The 500 degree stuff won't do the job.  I'd be dubious of the other higher temperature epoxy too.  Metal movement from thermal expansion would likely break the epoxy bond.  Large quantities of molten lead is nothing to be fooling around with.  Replace the cracked pot.

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3 hours ago, Dan Tinman said:

Lead begins to melt around 630 degrees F.  The 500 degree stuff won't do the job.  I'd be dubious of the other higher temperature epoxy too.  Metal movement from thermal expansion would likely break the epoxy bond.  Large quantities of molten lead is nothing to be fooling around with.  Replace the cracked pot.

Thank you Dan

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never ready paid a lot of attention as to how long a tank lasted....not long...we use to pour hundreds of   scallop drag leads for our use and others,then sinkers of all kinds,cod jigs, etc....once we got it fired off there was no stopping we just kept going .

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On 7/12/2019 at 7:46 AM, R.R. Bridge Fisher said:

Screenshot_20190712-074603_Gallery.jpg

take the top off and make metall stand for that and conect to the tank with hose,this way you can exchange the tank.or refill.

you can melt lead in any old stainles pot or aluminum pot with heave wall.

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1 hour ago, Wire For Fire said:

That things looks shady as hell .. can’t say I’d feel all warm and fuzzy melting lead over that old ass tank , even a new tank , that burners to close for me .. 

Sounds like a jet engine 

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1 hour ago, snag777 said:

take the top off and make metall stand for that and conect to the tank with hose,this way you can exchange the tank.or refill.

you can melt lead in any old stainles pot or aluminum pot with heave wall.

I wouldn't be too sure about an aluminum pot.  Goos pouring temperatures for lead is often in the 800 degree + range.  Aluminum begins to weaken long before that.

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                                   NOTE 

 

Alum. pot is not good , most stainless pans are to light will not hold the heat like the iron ones ,

 working with hot led ?? be careful no second chance ,  

   NOTE     do take the pot off the tank  not a good idea there is a seal between the tank an the shut off valve 

  that could give way  [ melt ] , an you will a big problem , not worth the chance ,,               AS I see it 

 

Edited by jsid6g

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1 hour ago, jsid6g said:

                                   NOTE 

 

Alum. pot is not good , most stainless pans are to light will not hold the heat like the iron ones ,

 working with hot led ?? be careful no second chance ,  

   NOTE     do take the pot off the tank  not a good idea there is a seal between the tank an the shut off valve 

  that could give way  [ melt ] , an you will a big problem , not worth the chance ,,               AS I see it 

 

+1

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