dieselgrady

Something fishy about my 2019 Avalon.

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Ehhh look at it this way; your engine is getting a fresh replenishment of new oil every so many thousand miles.

 

My BMW burns about a quart between changes and that's normal for an inline engine... 

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40 mins ago, DEM Parking Lot said:

Ehhh look at it this way; your engine is getting a fresh replenishment of new oil every so many thousand miles.

 

My BMW burns about a quart between changes and that's normal for an inline engine... 

My buddies x5 burned oil like crazy. 

 

My explorer sport and wife’s Tahoe never burns any. These new cars are great with oil

changes. I think the Tahoe is like every 7000 miles. 

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22 hours ago, dieselgrady said:

So I added another quart of 0-20W at about 5K and just brought the car in for the yearly service. The 2 quarts of oil I replaced were poo-pooed, by a service manager as acceptable. I expected that kind of response, so I basically just wanted my oil changed, tire rotation , etc. First 2 years of maintenance are on Toyota.  After sitting in the waiting room for 4 hours, I was told the plugs were being pulled and there was a problem! "DUH"  I don't think they gave a damn about my complaint, but I guess they ran an emissions check, and found the new AvalonI was burning oil. (REALLY) So I left Staten Island in a new Avalon (loaner) and they suspect the valve seals, but they'll let me know, after they (probably) pull the engine. Not my idea of a good experience for a new car. 

I agree with you on your last point.

this should not be going on.

one thing a lot overlook is the pcv system.

that sucks oil vapors and some amounts of combustion fumes out and into the intake to be burned.

now,that oily mess will pile up in the intake after a while.

that will make the engine ping and cause oil to leak into the engine through the topside.

on older engines I had I swapped out a 2 bbl for a 4bbl,I stood the 2bbl on end and leaned it on the tables leg.

when I looked a few minutes later,there was a pool of motor oil that was pooled up inside it and that made me add a catch can.

anyhow,,I hope they get your baby right for you.

keep us posted. 

HH

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Posted (edited) · Report post

HH,as important as it is to remove combustion by products from crankcase,the PCV systems main job is to keep the crankcase in a slight negative pressure and this is determined for particular engines by size of orifice in PCV valve. It’s essentially a calibrated vacuum leak to achieve negative pressure in crankcase.

 

Inop or partially clogged PCV system will build a positive pressure in crankcase and that can make front crank seal,rear main seal,oil pan and valve cover gaskets leak. They don’t seal well with positive crankcase pressure and can make engine leak like a sieve. More importantly positive crankcase pressure will force oil last rings on intake stroke as piston/rod descend into cylinder and lessen crankcase volumeThis oil is burned in combustion chamber.

Engines that have marginal ring sealing will develop a lot of blow by and this will pressurize crankcase and overwhelm the volume of PCV system as designed.

PCV system is meant to pull vapors from crankcase,not a highly concentrated mist of oil.

The mist of oil developed by worn rings and crankshaft churning thru oil on performance engines that turn a lot of rpm will eventually make its way up thru oil drains in cylinder head and both get sucked up by PCV valve into intake and blown out of breather into air cleaner.

 

If you’ve ever found oil in the bottom of an air filter housing,this is why,same reason oil is making its way into intake manifold.

Power adders,blowers,turbos on an engine with miles on it will generate a LOT of blow by and magnify this scenario. This is the main reason you would find considerable oil in an intake manifold and being burned in combustion chamber.

 

If you’ve ever seen serious bracket racers engines,you would see a large belt driven vacuum pump. It’s there to pull a high vacuum from crankcase to make rings seal tighter for more power.

some dragsters run a different setup. They run a cap on each valve cover with a nipple on it and run a hose from cap down to a bung on header collector. The high speed of hot exhaust gases rushing out of header creates a vacuum in bung on engine strong enough that it creates a large vacuum in crankcase that does same thing as vacuum pump.

Called free horsepower.

Edited by modelcitizen

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15 hours ago, modelcitizen said:

HH,as important as it is to remove combustion by products from crankcase,the PCV systems main job is to keep the crankcase in a slight negative pressure and this is determined for particular engines by size of orifice in PCV valve. It’s essentially a calibrated vacuum leak to achieve negative pressure in crankcase.

 

Inop or partially clogged PCV system will build a positive pressure in crankcase and that can make front crank seal,rear main seal,oil pan and valve cover gaskets leak. They don’t seal well with positive crankcase pressure and can make engine leak like a sieve. More importantly positive crankcase pressure will force oil last rings on intake stroke as piston/rod descend into cylinder and lessen crankcase volumeThis oil is burned in combustion chamber.

Engines that have marginal ring sealing will develop a lot of blow by and this will pressurize crankcase and overwhelm the volume of PCV system as designed.

PCV system is meant to pull vapors from crankcase,not a highly concentrated mist of oil.

The mist of oil developed by worn rings and crankshaft churning thru oil on performance engines that turn a lot of rpm will eventually make its way up thru oil drains in cylinder head and both get sucked up by PCV valve into intake and blown out of breather into air cleaner.

 

If you’ve ever found oil in the bottom of an air filter housing,this is why,same reason oil is making its way into intake manifold.

Power adders,blowers,turbos on an engine with miles on it will generate a LOT of blow by and magnify this scenario. This is the main reason you would find considerable oil in an intake manifold and being burned in combustion chamber.

 

If you’ve ever seen serious bracket racers engines,you would see a large belt driven vacuum pump. It’s there to pull a high vacuum from crankcase to make rings seal tighter for more power.

some dragsters run a different setup. They run a cap on each valve cover with a nipple on it and run a hose from cap down to a bung on header collector. The high speed of hot exhaust gases rushing out of header creates a vacuum in bung on engine strong enough that it creates a large vacuum in crankcase that does same thing as vacuum pump.

Called free horsepower.

yes,I know that.

I built several of my own some years ago.

I also saw several intakes with oil in them that made me use a catch can too.

it came from the fog that it sucks up.

I did a check awhile afterwards and no more was present in the intake,,as I was told there would not be,the builder was right.

HH

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Ive owned 2 toyotas a 2011 camry and now a recent purchase a 2017 tacoma. They aren’t burning oil at the 5k mark when i change my oil. Although I’ve heard from a couple of my co-workers (used to work in autoshop) say that yotas tend to burn oil every 3k? Ive never had that problem though :shrug: 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

On ‎10‎/‎2‎/‎2019 at 7:48 PM, dieselgrady said:

So I added another quart of 0-20W at about 5K and just brought the car in for the yearly service. The 2 quarts of oil I replaced were poo-pooed, by a service manager as acceptable. I expected that kind of response, so I basically just wanted my oil changed, tire rotation , etc. First 2 years of maintenance are on Toyota.  After sitting in the waiting room for 4 hours, I was told the plugs were being pulled and there was a problem! "DUH"  I don't think they gave a damn about my complaint, but I guess they ran an emissions check, and found the new AvalonI was burning oil. (REALLY) So I left Staten Island in a new Avalon (loaner) and they suspect the valve seals, but they'll let me know, after they (probably) pull the engine. Not my idea of a good experience for a new car. 

so,DG,fill us all in on how she is doing now,,,,

we await!

HH

Edited by Heavy Hooksetter

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I looked into the NY lemon law and besides the $250 filing fee(I guess they want you yo be serious)  it requires multiple long tern loss of the car. The light drips that were in my driveway (after pulling the engine and replacing the valve seals, and putting on lift to do final check or so they say) seem to have slowed, but still there. And the 50+ miles of testing the car seems to have been unmentioned by Toyota, on the other hand the driver did not get a camera generated red light or speeding violation. Not to mention the cup of quarters my wife left in the console that went missing. So will keep the car for a few years, and will now become a car leaser. Probably not a Toyota, Thanks for your input 

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Keep good records and copies of dealer work orders.  You may find one day having to invoke a lemon law.  I've had dealers do work under warranty and not show the problem on the work order they gave me.  Had to ask for an order with the problem, and the fix, stated.

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On ‎12‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 5:30 PM, dieselgrady said:

I looked into the NY lemon law and besides the $250 filing fee(I guess they want you yo be serious)  it requires multiple long tern loss of the car. The light drips that were in my driveway (after pulling the engine and replacing the valve seals, and putting on lift to do final check or so they say) seem to have slowed, but still there. And the 50+ miles of testing the car seems to have been unmentioned by Toyota, on the other hand the driver did not get a camera generated red light or speeding violation. Not to mention the cup of quarters my wife left in the console that went missing. So will keep the car for a few years, and will now become a car leaser. Probably not a Toyota, Thanks for your input 

I have heard that Toyota's quality has gone down the drian,not sure why or actually know because I am not a yota guy.

my wifes 2010 Tacoma has been solid and now with the tranny pan replaced it is doing good so far.

I'm a ford guy and not the new stuff,the old stuff.

always loved the LTD and still have one now.

anyhow,good luck with yours and hope it all works well for you DG.

HH

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