drmevo

Trouble casting Airflo Ridge intermediate

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115 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

 

 

So why do some of us like to cast them over short heads.

They do perform better casting into a head wind where line shooting is not an option as wind is too strong.

They are thinner and more sensitive when fishing a current as they cause less drag.

The other reasons are more subjective in my case I love the way they cast.

 

Just another thought. If these lines were only ever good for experts we would need to question the marketing decisions of line companies. Not going to sell very many.

Maybe they did just that and came out with SH ones.

 

Mike

 

 

 

 

This kinda what I mean.  These advantages are subtle for an intermediate and not at all important for a beginner.  Whereas being able to easily load the rod and get off a decent cast using a minimum number of false casts (with a int. shooting head) would be very important. This may be a great line but there is something better out there for the OP. I can certainly see how someone with thousand of hours of seat time would put priority on tactile feel that a certain piece of gear gives him.  But a non expert just wants to get the fly to the fishes face.

 

As for marketing, F the fly line companies. Their goal is to make you buy 17 fly lines before you figure out which is the right one for you.  Rio still doesn't mark their fly lines.  I have a thousand dollars worth of flylines sitting on my bench that I can't figure out what the hell they are.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Cpalms said:

As for marketing, F the fly line companies. Their goal is to make you buy 17 fly lines before you figure out which is the right one for you.  Rio still doesn't mark their fly lines.  I have a thousand dollars worth of flylines sitting on my bench that I can't figure out what the hell they are.

 

 

If you have trust numbers what was writen to the box you have not known what you have put to your reels too good because manufacturers do not follow line standard. Only Cortland seems to follow AFFTA and Scientific Anglers used too but lately some lines have come overweight.

 

It is very easy and fast to measure fly lines. Measure 30ft from the tip, coil it and put to a cardboard cup which weight you tare to zero. Hold the rest of line in your hand at same level the cup rim is and six inches away so that 30ft length mark comes three inches out of cup rim. This weight define the line weight so compare it to AFFTA standard and you know easily within tenths what line weight you have.

 

Measure also full head length and take its weight too because that is what we often cast. Line length is very fast to measure when five feet mark is put to the table edge from table corner and line is pulled thru hands counting 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30... Then only what comes in between needs to be measured using tape measure.

 

Line sink rate is more complicated and volume calculation is needed and it begins using using caliper but if you have few different line weights comparing just diameters can give quite good idea of sink rate. Also color when faster sinking line usually is darker. Weighing rear and front half weights give very good measure how line behaves. Especially for Spey lines this "weight balance" is very good measure.

 

Esa

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Line weights, tapers, and length/weight profiles for a given "X" weight marking - not standard.

 

Rod performance characteristics for a given "X weight marking - not standard.

 

User characteristics and casting abilities - not standard. 

 

Result:  crap shoot.

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6 hours ago, Cpalms said:

This kinda what I mean.  These advantages are subtle for an intermediate and not at all important for a beginner.  Whereas being able to easily load the rod and get off a decent cast using a minimum number of false casts (with a int. shooting head) would be very important. This may be a great line but there is something better out there for the OP. I can certainly see how someone with thousand of hours of seat time would put priority on tactile feel that a certain piece of gear gives him.  But a non expert just wants to get the fly to the fishes face.

 

As for marketing, F the fly line companies. Their goal is to make you buy 17 fly lines before you figure out which is the right one for you.  Rio still doesn't mark their fly lines.  I have a thousand dollars worth of flylines sitting on my bench that I can't figure out what the hell they are.

 

 

Ok we are on same page now after thinking this through a lot more. I am not a quick learner.

 

I have to buy a set of digital scales to. In same boat with a mess of lines .

 

I coded them with sharpie marks but I forgot what my own code means.

 

Frustrating.

 

Why did all of a sudden fly line prices move from around 50 to 90.

 

mike

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My basement is full of lines that are not marked and I don't know what they are or do as well. I never overload a rod, so I can at least narrow it down to being either an 8,9 or 10 but that's about it. I've never used a short head line like those described, I only use 2-3 false casts anyway but I do see the advantage of not needing backcast room. Would love to try one but like many ain't gonna put down $90 for something I might not like...

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I went out in the yard with the Airflo last night for some practice. Nice night with minimal wind.  I have an archery target set up where I can stand at 20 yards with another 20 yards to work with behind me. I was able to get my fly within about 10 feet of the target fairly regularly (5 foot leader). So maybe 40-50 foot casts, with the occasional 60 footer. As I think about it, I think the big difference has really been that I've been able to punch through the wind with the Rio and get the line to lay out straight more consistently. I guess this makes sense given the difference in line types? I don't know about you guys, but there is pretty much always some wind in the places I fish.

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4 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

 

 

Why did all of a sudden fly line prices move from around 50 to 90.

 

mike

I guess the industry just figured out a place where they can charge more now that fly rods and reels are cheaper than they used to be.

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I wish they would make that line in a 11 and 12wt to. It's kinda amazing that with all the different fly lines on the market right now that there's a lack of intermediate lines with a longer taper on them that don't require  100degrees of heat to make them work. 

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4 hours ago, Mike Oliver said:

 

I coded them with sharpie marks but I forgot what my own code means.

 

Frustrating.

 

 

 

38 mins ago, stormy monday said:

My basement is full of lines that are not marked and I don't know what they are or do as well. 

Rio and any other fly line company should have service where you can send them a line and they can tell you exactly what the line is - free of charge. When they send it back they include candy bar as restitution.

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6 hours ago, crunch said:

 

It is very easy and fast to measure fly lines. Measure 30ft from the tip, coil it and put to a cardboard cup which weight you tare to zero. Hold the rest of line in your hand at same level the cup rim is and six inches away so that 30ft length mark comes three inches out of cup rim. This weight define the line weight so compare it to AFFTA standard and you know easily within tenths what line weight you have.

 

Measure also full head length and take its weight too because that is what we often cast. Line length is very fast to measure when five feet mark is put to the table edge from table corner and line is pulled thru hands counting 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30... Then only what comes in between needs to be measured using tape measure.

 

Line sink rate is more complicated and volume calculation is needed and it begins using using caliper but if you have few different line weights comparing just diameters can give quite good idea of sink rate. Also color when faster sinking line usually is darker. Weighing rear and front half weights give very good measure how line behaves. Especially for Spey lines this "weight balance" is very good measure.

 

Esa

 

Rio has 15 different flyline models designed for flats fishing - all floaters -  each offered in 3 or 4 different weights.  So to round, call it 50 lines are all floaters all designed for flats fishing.  All unmarked. 

 

Outbound shorts come in 6 different sink rates in 5 or so line weights each.  All unmarked.

 

Ridiculous

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22 hours ago, crunch said:

 

 

If you can access internet on practice field search "Fly Casting Video Masterclass" and follow the lessons. .

 

Esa

Who is is by?   

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2 hours ago, drmevo said:

I went out in the yard with the Airflo last night for some practice. Nice night with minimal wind.  I have an archery target set up where I can stand at 20 yards with another 20 yards to work with behind me. I was able to get my fly within about 10 feet of the target fairly regularly (5 foot leader). So maybe 40-50 foot casts, with the occasional 60 footer. As I think about it, I think the big difference has really been that I've been able to punch through the wind with the Rio and get the line to lay out straight more consistently. I guess this makes sense given the difference in line types? I don't know about you guys, but there is pretty much always some wind in the places I fish.

Really come back to the first base. The short  head you are  finding easier to cast so it is also going to be the line that casts best into the wind for you.

 

You would need to get more head outside rod top with the Airflo. If you could do that then the story might be reversed . But line speed would also come into the equation.

Wind can be our friend and enemy.

 

mike

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2 hours ago, jabster said:

I wish they would make that line in a 11 and 12wt to. It's kinda amazing that with all the different fly lines on the market right now that there's a lack of intermediate lines with a longer taper on them that don't require  100degrees of heat to make them work. 

This.  I keep looking for older (new old stock or lightly used) SA tarpon intermediate lines in 11wt to 13/14wt.   You would think that some company would figure it out and provide a surf line for us that doesn't need stretching every 10 min.

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1 hour ago, ccb said:

Who is is by?   

Sorry, I don't understand what you mean?

 

Paul Arden has made them. He is hardest core fly fisherman I know and Paul has had biggest influence to distance casting knowledge spreading all over the world thru sexyloops forum and big influence what comes to teaching and certitying fly line casting instructors. FCVMC did originally cost money but now they are free!

 

Esa

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