Birdsnester

The amazing Sand Shark (Dogfish) experiment

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She fought like a beelzebub. Hit her with the ..357 took 3 rounds to ro pur her down. 

 

 

Edited by the3fishheads

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Do you bleed them first, I have a problem filleting something alive, I prefer to dispatch whatever I harvest as quickly as possible

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3 hours ago, Dave T. said:

Do you bleed them first, I have a problem filleting something alive, I prefer to dispatch whatever I harvest as quickly as possible

Dead is Dead   You can bleed them I guess but better to get the act done quickly rather then a slower death from blood loss and suffocation 

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Posted (edited) · Report post

U got to slit their throat immediately while the hearts still pumping. Straight on ice. Grill when u get home.

Example bft.

 

 But they need closer attention. 

 

20160408_202344_001-1.jpg

Edited by the3fishheads

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The Italian fishmonger always had "pesce canne" (sp?) aka dogfish.

Big tails that they'd steak for you.

Rolled in flour and a little corn meal, lightly fried in olive oil with a little butter.

Good stuff. Like a little hamsteak with that round bone in the middle.

My son in law didn't eat fish. Dogfish is how we got him started.

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54 mins ago, Captain Ahab said:

Dead is Dead   You can bleed them I guess but better to get the act done quickly rather then a slower death from blood loss and suffocation 

No offense and I am far from a “bleeding heart” ( pun intended) but to me quickly dispatching whatever I am harvesting is a must. Slicing the fillets off of a still live fish to me is akin to cutting off the fins and releasing to die. Properly bled fish expire in minutes, and to me seems more respectful of the resource than the alternative. My .02

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2 hours ago, Dave T. said:

No offense and I am far from a “bleeding heart” ( pun intended) but to me quickly dispatching whatever I am harvesting is a must. Slicing the fillets off of a still live fish to me is akin to cutting off the fins and releasing to die. Properly bled fish expire in minutes, and to me seems more respectful of the resource than the alternative. My .02

Bleed ice and grill. Story ticket.

Even applys to moose.

And everything else.

,

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On ‎7‎/‎6‎/‎2019 at 7:52 PM, DeepBlue85 said:

They need to be killed quickly and skinned as soon as possible.  They piss through their skin which retains alot of the smell. 

This ^^^^^ I have a guy that comes in my B & T everyday for bait ,he loves these things. He said in England where he's from ,cod is non-existent and everyone uses Dogfish now for fish and chips.

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3 hours ago, AlwaysWading said:

This ^^^^^ I have a guy that comes in my B & T everyday for bait ,he loves these things. He said in England where he's from ,cod is non-existent and everyone uses Dogfish now for fish and chips.

I fed them to quite a few people this past weekend.  Everyone and I mean everyone absolutely loved them.  I may have gone overboard a bit by soaking them in milk for 24 hours but I had to get rid of the smell.  We do have picky fish eaters in my family.  The meat was very mild to say the least and fairly firm.    These suckers are not throw a ways any longer.  Most people preferred them over my southern fried Bluefish which I think  is pretty great.

Edited by Birdsnester

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On 7/9/2019 at 3:02 PM, Great Egg said:

Anybody try eating the wings from the 3' to 6' cow nose rays?  Prep suggestions?

I've never had them, but a few years ago, Virginia tried to encourage anglers to eat them, as they were considered an "underutilized species" and, at the time, were wrongly thought to be harming Chesapeake Bay shellfisheries.  

 

Supposedly, the effort never caught on because the rays' flesh is reddish and more like meat than fish.  However, if you want to try, you can google "Virginia ray recipes" and find some to give you a start.

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