jjdbike

Electric cord warm????

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Hey everyone, I’ve got a question.

I noticed that the electric cord on my dehumidifier in my basement is warm. Not hot, just slightly warm.

What does that mean? Is it normal or should I be concerned?

Now, it’s been topping out close to 90 degrees & pretty darn humid so I’m sure it’s working hard & drawing maximum juice.

What do you folks think?

Respectfully,

JD

 

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Thanks,

it’s the stock cord that was on it outta the box from the factory.

That being said, this thing has been running for years (approx 5 or 7).

JD

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I have two Dyson vacuums that the cords get warm within minutes of being on. They've been that way since new. I've also come across a number of appliances with warm cords over the years. When I say warm, I mean like warm. Not much more than that. 

 

I wouldn't worry about it too much but if it's getting warmer than that, change out the cord or pull an amperage reading. 

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9 mins ago, Scallywag said:

I have two Dyson vacuums that the cords get warm within minutes of being on. They've been that way since new. I've also come across a number of appliances with warm cords over the years. When I say warm, I mean like warm. Not much more than that. 

 

I wouldn't worry about it too much but if it's getting warmer than that, change out the cord or pull an amperage reading. 

 Thanks for that reply.

 Both things you suggested are beyond my skill set.

Its been running w/ out issues for years so probably okay. 

I’m guessing it might have something to do w/ us being in a heat wave (temps & humidity from hell). I hate this weather. I’ll take a cool crisp Spring of Fall day anytime, this is miserable. I feel badly for those who must work outside.

Best Regards,

JD

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I'm with you on the temps. I hate the heat. If the thing is running non stop, try turning down the settings. The fan draws far less power than the compressor. Allow the fan to run more and compressor less. 

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jj, with cords best bet is go minimum length needed and larger gauge. The longer the cord and the smaller the gauge with a given load the greater amount of resistance in the wire and that wire will get warm. Take that same load and give it a shorter cord and larger gauge the resistance goes down and the temp will too. 

 

 

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On 7/3/2019 at 7:06 AM, jjdbike said:

Thanks,

it’s the stock cord that was on it outta the box from the factory.

That being said, this thing has been running for years (approx 5 or 7).

JD

If you've got a sloppy fit at the outlet " slightly loose plug, not snug" the cord or plug will sometimes heat up. You may need to replace the outlet.

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7 hours ago, SB59 said:

If you've got a sloppy fit at the outlet " slightly loose plug, not snug" the cord or plug will sometimes heat up. You may need to replace the outlet.

Interesting you said that. 

Yesterday while rearranging   my basement to accommodate my new larger chest freezer, I plugged the dehumidifier into a heavy duty outdoor orange extension cord. Too long I know (like 20’). I figured it was for a short time so any risk would be minimal. Wrong! I bought a 6’ 14 gauge “appliance extension cord” and tried to replace the orange cord. It was stuck. I had to pry them apart and they one prong pulled out of the dehumidifiers plug. 

Now I wonder if I need to replace the entire dehumidifier or if I can have the plug replaced. If so, shall I have it replaced w/ a slightly longer & heavier gauge cord?

Or, is the reason prong pulled out same reason cord was warm?  Could it have fused together? If so does that mean the whole unit is bad?

I don’t really want to buy a new unit but will if it’s safest choice.

What do you guys think?

ID

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8 mins ago, ted527 said:

Just put a new plug on humidifier cord.

Thanks.

My original concern was a warm electric cord. I also need the cord to be longer or a short extension cord, which I know isn’t optimal.

I wonder if it’s possible to replace whole cord   W/ a longer one & thinker gauge. Might eliminate need for extension & thicker gauge might eliminate or decrease warm cord issue?

It possible & is my logic correct?

Thanks!

JD

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Posted (edited) · Report post

5 hours ago, jjdbike said:

Now I wonder if I need to replace the entire dehumidifier or if I can have the plug replaced. If so, shall I have it replaced w/ a slightly longer & heavier gauge cord?

Or, is the reason prong pulled out same reason cord was warm?  Could it have fused together? If so does that mean the whole unit is bad?

I don’t really want to buy a new unit but will if it’s safest choice.

What do you guys think?

ID

You will only be guessing until you determine the current draw while just the fan is running and then again what the reading is when the compressor is running.  The plug in meter I posted below can be had for $20 - $30.  HF has one for $25.

 

 

 

20190705_085216.jpg

Edited by illrepute
uploaded wrong file

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18 mins ago, illrepute said:

You will only be guessing until you determine the current draw while just the fan is running and then again what the reading is when the compressor is running.  The plug in meter I posted below can be had for $20 - $30.  HF has one for $25.

 

 

 

20190705_085216.jpg

Thanks Brother,

I wish I’d done that before the plug got broken.

JD

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A broken or compromised plug will drive up the amp draw as much as the appliance itself.

 

You can certainly replace the entire cord, but doing so will depend on how it is connected inside the unit and what your skill levels are. sometimes it can be as simple as taking off some wire nuts and untwisting the old connection and twisting on the new one. Other times there may be a terminal board with screws for the cord wires. Both fairly easy. Harder is if it is soldered directly to a circuit board.

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