OutdoorLover

Frog Gigging

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New on the forum here, not sure if this has been addressed or if anyone even has answers for me. Wondering if anyone knows any ponds/lakes to go frog gigging at in Suffolk County, preferably the North Fork of LI? 

 

Thank you in advance for anyone giving info!

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There are quite a few frogs in a number of shallow, weedy East End ponds.  Be careful of cyanobacteria blooms; there are a lot of those out there, too.

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2 hours ago, CWitek said:

There are quite a few frogs in a number of shallow, weedy East End ponds.  Be careful of cyanobacteria blooms; there are a lot of those out there, too.

Thank you for that info, definitely helpful and geographically it works out perfect. I am going to use google maps to look for these ponds and then scout them out in person, unless you have another suggestion????

 

Thanks!

 

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Check the DEC website; it lists Suffolk County ponds with public access.  Also, take a look at the ponds at Otis Pike, which is a multiple-use recreational area owned by DEC.

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Also, check the DEC regulations on taking bullfrogs, just to make sure that you’re doing everything right

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19 hours ago, Popasilov said:

Why frog?

Out of other things?

Practice for something?

Why not frog?

 

If you can find enough, they make a good meal.

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22 hours ago, Popasilov said:

Why frog?

Out of other things?

Practice for something?

In fact, I have almost run out of everything new to try. So I thought it would be cool to get in to something new. I’ve fished in and out of the LIS, fished freshwater ponds all around the North Fork. Hunted and trapped all over LI as well. 

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So if you have done all of these things, you would most likely have noticed how few frogs really remain here on Long Island.  Their are some places that have healthy populations but most are severely limited.  Lawn chemicals and mosquito spraying have knocked the populations for a loop.  Don't see any toads around your lawn if you put down crabgrass killer, right? Want to spear something that would be beneficial to sportsmen, go spear hunt feral cat populations.  They consume everything, rabbits, birds, chipmunks, frogs, baby quail and pheasant...pretty much anything that moves.  It would be more challenging and beneficial to the mammal, bird and amphibian populations and satisfy your stated need for a new outdoors rush.   They've got to be tougher to get near than a bullfrog and would probably taste the same.

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I appreciate that insight, don’t notice many frogs, but also even when I’m out of state (normally PA) I don’t even notice the frogs until the sun goes down.

Edited by OutdoorLover

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Speaking of consuming everything. Once introduced, they typically become dominant. Because of their large size and voracious appetite, bullfrogs outcompete and prey upon many indigenous species. Bullfrogs directly predate indigenous frog species,which has lead to numerous frog declines. And they are delicious. You can fish for them with flys or stick them. Either way have fun and don't pay any attention to the naysayers.

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Well Gentlemen, I just had my first experience frog gigging and it was quite the experience. So much fun and major adrenaline rush. Got a good amount, but made sure that they were of size before gigging them. Going to use a Franks Hot Sauce wash and then dredge in flour and deep fry. Can’t wait for them. 

 

I clearly am not an expert on this, but this is something anyone can do and can have a lot of fun with. With young kids or being an adult. Lots of fun and hopefully great tasting!

 

Thanks for for all the help!

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Apparently, they are native to Long Island

 

Wikipedia

Quote

This frog is native to southern and eastern parts of the United States and Canada, but has been widely introduced across other parts of North, Central and South America, Western Europe, and parts of Asia, and in some areas is regarded as an invasive species.

 

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