Steve in Mass

Torn On Whether I Sent the Right Impression.....

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Earlier this week, I heard the following news story on the radio, as I guess the bill finally went thru:

 

Lemonade Freedom!' Bill Letting Children in Texas Legally Run Their Own Lemonade Stands Passes
BY RACHEL E. GREENSPAN 
 MARCH 21, 2019


Kids in Texas can soon lawfully run lemonade stands on their block, all thanks to their state’s legislature.

 

Now that a bill passed in the legislature on Wednesday, according to the Dallas News, it will move to the Texas state Senate.

Sponsored by Rep. Matt Krause, a Republican representing Fort Worth, the very important bill makes it illegal for children under the age of 18 to be required any kind of license to sell their lemonade “or other nonalcoholic beverages.”

 

At present, it’s illegal for children to hold lemonade stands in the Lone Star State due to health concerns over homemade and unregulated drinks. The law, if instated, would overturn the ban from the Texas Food Establishment Rules from the state’s health department.


“Lemonade freedom” is apparently a very big deal in Texas, and Krause made his feelings on the matter heard. “Today is lemonade freedom day,” Krause said on Tuesday, the Dallas News reports. “It’s a great day for our Texas entrepreneurs.” Some of those mini-entrepreneurs demonstrated their passion outside government offices on Tuesday as the bill was considered.

 

About 6 hours later after work I was driving down a semi-rural road here in Sharon Mass, and lo and behold there are two kids perhaps 5-7 years old, standing at the curb in front of their house with a sign "Lemonade".  I laughed and thought "How ironic!"

 

And while I don't drink lemonade (or any other sugar containing beverage), I made it a point to circle around the block and gp back. The kids were all excited as I pulled up (mom sitting there in a beach chair reading a book, yes an actual BOOK not her stupid iPhone). I told her briefly about the above story, and she was "Really, they tried to make this illegal? How stupid!" I laughed and agreed.

 

The lemonade was $0.50 a cup (small Dixie cup). I asked for two of them. The one kid hands me the two cups, says "Thank you" and walks away....I said 'hold on there, you forgot the MOST IMPORTANT THING!" He looked ta me puzzled, and then I said "Um, you have to collect the money!"

 

We all laughed and I handed him 3 one dollar bills, saying "I know there is extra there, but you keep it, good for you for doing this." The two kids were all excited.

 

I waved and drove away, and I actually drank about half a cup of the lemonade, and surprisingly it was pretty good, not overly sweet. But half a cup was enough for me.....

 

A little while later it came to me that perhaps I did the wrong thing. I mean, by giving them the $2 extra, my intent was to reward them for taking the initiative to do this and encourage their entrepreneurship.

 

But then I thought perhaps it was such a good idea, as I am wondering if it sent a message that they can always expect to be rewarded beyond what their product or service is worth, and in the future they will feel it unfair if they aren't.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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15 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

Earlier this week, I heard the following news story on the radio, as I guess the bill finally went thru:

 

Lemonade Freedom!' Bill Letting Children in Texas Legally Run Their Own Lemonade Stands Passes
BY RACHEL E. GREENSPAN 
 MARCH 21, 2019


Kids in Texas can soon lawfully run lemonade stands on their block, all thanks to their state’s legislature.

 

Now that a bill passed in the legislature on Wednesday, according to the Dallas News, it will move to the Texas state Senate.

Sponsored by Rep. Matt Krause, a Republican representing Fort Worth, the very important bill makes it illegal for children under the age of 18 to be required any kind of license to sell their lemonade “or other nonalcoholic beverages.”

 

At present, it’s illegal for children to hold lemonade stands in the Lone Star State due to health concerns over homemade and unregulated drinks. The law, if instated, would overturn the ban from the Texas Food Establishment Rules from the state’s health department.


“Lemonade freedom” is apparently a very big deal in Texas, and Krause made his feelings on the matter heard. “Today is lemonade freedom day,” Krause said on Tuesday, the Dallas News reports. “It’s a great day for our Texas entrepreneurs.” Some of those mini-entrepreneurs demonstrated their passion outside government offices on Tuesday as the bill was considered.

 

About 6 hours later after work I was driving down a semi-rural road here in Sharon Mass, and lo and behold there are two kids perhaps 5-7 years old, standing at the curb in front of their house with a sign "Lemonade".  I laughed and thought "How ironic!"

 

And while I don't drink lemonade (or any other sugar containing beverage), I made it a point to circle around the block and gp back. The kids were all excited as I pulled up (mom sitting there in a beach chair reading a book, yes an actual BOOK not her stupid iPhone). I told her briefly about the above story, and she was "Really, they tried to make this illegal? How stupid!" I laughed and agreed.

 

The lemonade was $0.50 a cup (small Dixie cup). I asked for two of them. The one kid hands me the two cups, says "Thank you" and walks away....I said 'hold on there, you forgot the MOST IMPORTANT THING!" He looked ta me puzzled, and then I said "Um, you have to collect the money!"

 

We all laughed and I handed him 3 one dollar bills, saying "I know there is extra there, but you keep it, good for you for doing this." The two kids were all excited.

 

I waved and drove away, and I actually drank about half a cup of the lemonade, and surprisingly it was pretty good, not overly sweet. But half a cup was enough for me.....

 

A little while later it came to me that perhaps I did the wrong thing. I mean, by giving them the $2 extra, my intent was to reward them for taking the initiative to do this and encourage their entrepreneurship.

 

But then I thought perhaps it was such a good idea, as I am wondering if it sent a message that they can always expect to be rewarded beyond what their product or service is worth, and in the future they will feel it unfair if they aren't.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lol...drive by their stand again and see if they raised their prices to a dollar fifty a cup.  Then you will know you taught them that the difference between making a modest profit and greed to making the most profit will contribute to their success as entrepreneurs when no one else buys their drinks.

 

 

Now if they are charging the same price see if they upgraded their stand in any way and you will know you have true entrepreneurs who know the value of reinvesting.

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A true capitalist would have offered them $5 for a 50% equity stake in the business.

You could have came back the next day and demanded your cut.

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We live in a tourist community that also has an ordinance banning lemon aid stands.  Most law enforcement look the other way unless some adult males a complaint.  Before the ordinance 25 years ago my kids decided to offer lemon aid and bottled water near a tourist attraction.  They made up a sign “Free water and lemonade - donations accepted “.   Well some of the local businesses about a mile away started complaining and the cops came and told the kids to beat it.  Tourists loved it as there was no where else to get a cold drink on a hot day.  All it took was some adults to squash a great learning experience in managing a small business - the kids used funds gathered as donations to buy more supplies.  I supplied the cooler and ice.  

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2 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

Earlier this week, I heard the following news story on the radio, as I guess the bill finally went thru:

 

Lemonade Freedom!' Bill Letting Children in Texas Legally Run Their Own Lemonade Stands Passes
BY RACHEL E. GREENSPAN 
 MARCH 21, 2019


Kids in Texas can soon lawfully run lemonade stands on their block, all thanks to their state’s legislature.

 

Now that a bill passed in the legislature on Wednesday, according to the Dallas News, it will move to the Texas state Senate.

Sponsored by Rep. Matt Krause, a Republican representing Fort Worth, the very important bill makes it illegal for children under the age of 18 to be required any kind of license to sell their lemonade “or other nonalcoholic beverages.”

 

At present, it’s illegal for children to hold lemonade stands in the Lone Star State due to health concerns over homemade and unregulated drinks. The law, if instated, would overturn the ban from the Texas Food Establishment Rules from the state’s health department.


“Lemonade freedom” is apparently a very big deal in Texas, and Krause made his feelings on the matter heard. “Today is lemonade freedom day,” Krause said on Tuesday, the Dallas News reports. “It’s a great day for our Texas entrepreneurs.” Some of those mini-entrepreneurs demonstrated their passion outside government offices on Tuesday as the bill was considered.

 

About 6 hours later after work I was driving down a semi-rural road here in Sharon Mass, and lo and behold there are two kids perhaps 5-7 years old, standing at the curb in front of their house with a sign "Lemonade".  I laughed and thought "How ironic!"

 

And while I don't drink lemonade (or any other sugar containing beverage), I made it a point to circle around the block and gp back. The kids were all excited as I pulled up (mom sitting there in a beach chair reading a book, yes an actual BOOK not her stupid iPhone). I told her briefly about the above story, and she was "Really, they tried to make this illegal? How stupid!" I laughed and agreed.

 

The lemonade was $0.50 a cup (small Dixie cup). I asked for two of them. The one kid hands me the two cups, says "Thank you" and walks away....I said 'hold on there, you forgot the MOST IMPORTANT THING!" He looked ta me puzzled, and then I said "Um, you have to collect the money!"

 

We all laughed and I handed him 3 one dollar bills, saying "I know there is extra there, but you keep it, good for you for doing this." The two kids were all excited.

 

I waved and drove away, and I actually drank about half a cup of the lemonade, and surprisingly it was pretty good, not overly sweet. But half a cup was enough for me.....

 

A little while later it came to me that perhaps I did the wrong thing. I mean, by giving them the $2 extra, my intent was to reward them for taking the initiative to do this and encourage their entrepreneurship.

 

But then I thought perhaps it was such a good idea, as I am wondering if it sent a message that they can always expect to be rewarded beyond what their product or service is worth, and in the future they will feel it unfair if they aren't.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A modest tip is appropriate as the kids age a little more. 

 

Youngsters like 5, 7... thinking you toss em some cash is fine.   10-11, they get more modest change.

 

Actual volume is what makes ti fun.  Go back, as for more "guys that was good!" tell others to swing by.  Volume makes it.  one creepy old guy tipping $38, pint missed.

 

;-)

 

thats just my 2 cents.  

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You're overthinking this. The kids were being self reliant instead of texting on a maxipad! I got plenty of overpayments when I had my business. It just taught me that quality work and being nice to people pays well.

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2 hours ago, saltydawg said:

But it’s untaxed...we need to move the wealth from these successful lemonade stands to the federal government!

:laugh:

 

Back in the late 60's and early 70's, I lived in a "development" neighborhood in Clifton NJ. A bunch of houses built back in the 40's after the war, nearly all the same design on 50' x 100' foot lots. There were easily 200 houses on the 3 block cul de sac.

 

Among other things I did to make money (mowing lawns, shoveling snow, delivering papers), come Christmas time I would make wreaths and grave blankets, a talent I learned from my Grandfather that did it that time of year on a larger scale (and I would help him for cash as well.)

 

I would display them on our front lawn with a sign saying "For Sale" and most all the neighbors loved it and I did a pretty good business. Over the course of 5 -6 weeks between T'Day and Christmas I could make $200 or more, which back then to a 12 year old kind, I was rolling in gold.

 

One year a cop knocks at our door and said he got a complaint from a neighbor that I was doing this. My Mom agreed to take down the sign, but the display would remain. The cop laughed and knew this all was silly, and later that evening he actually came back and bought 2 wreaths from me....... :)

 

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6 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

Earlier this week, I heard the following news story on the radio, as I guess the bill finally went thru:

 

Lemonade Freedom!' Bill Letting Children in Texas Legally Run Their Own Lemonade Stands Passes
BY RACHEL E. GREENSPAN 
 MARCH 21, 2019


Kids in Texas can soon lawfully run lemonade stands on their block, all thanks to their state’s legislature.

 

Now that a bill passed in the legislature on Wednesday, according to the Dallas News, it will move to the Texas state Senate.

Sponsored by Rep. Matt Krause, a Republican representing Fort Worth, the very important bill makes it illegal for children under the age of 18 to be required any kind of license to sell their lemonade “or other nonalcoholic beverages.”

 

At present, it’s illegal for children to hold lemonade stands in the Lone Star State due to health concerns over homemade and unregulated drinks. The law, if instated, would overturn the ban from the Texas Food Establishment Rules from the state’s health department.


“Lemonade freedom” is apparently a very big deal in Texas, and Krause made his feelings on the matter heard. “Today is lemonade freedom day,” Krause said on Tuesday, the Dallas News reports. “It’s a great day for our Texas entrepreneurs.” Some of those mini-entrepreneurs demonstrated their passion outside government offices on Tuesday as the bill was considered.

 

About 6 hours later after work I was driving down a semi-rural road here in Sharon Mass, and lo and behold there are two kids perhaps 5-7 years old, standing at the curb in front of their house with a sign "Lemonade".  I laughed and thought "How ironic!"

 

And while I don't drink lemonade (or any other sugar containing beverage), I made it a point to circle around the block and gp back. The kids were all excited as I pulled up (mom sitting there in a beach chair reading a book, yes an actual BOOK not her stupid iPhone). I told her briefly about the above story, and she was "Really, they tried to make this illegal? How stupid!" I laughed and agreed.

 

The lemonade was $0.50 a cup (small Dixie cup). I asked for two of them. The one kid hands me the two cups, says "Thank you" and walks away....I said 'hold on there, you forgot the MOST IMPORTANT THING!" He looked ta me puzzled, and then I said "Um, you have to collect the money!"

 

We all laughed and I handed him 3 one dollar bills, saying "I know there is extra there, but you keep it, good for you for doing this." The two kids were all excited.

 

I waved and drove away, and I actually drank about half a cup of the lemonade, and surprisingly it was pretty good, not overly sweet. But half a cup was enough for me.....

 

A little while later it came to me that perhaps I did the wrong thing. I mean, by giving them the $2 extra, my intent was to reward them for taking the initiative to do this and encourage their entrepreneurship.

 

But then I thought perhaps it was such a good idea, as I am wondering if it sent a message that they can always expect to be rewarded beyond what their product or service is worth, and in the future they will feel it unfair if they aren't.

 

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I think it's stupid to harass or stop a kid from selling lemonade, but 16 is not a kid, that's an adult. I think the oldest kid I ever saw selling lemonade was about 12. That law should be for kids under the age of 16 (or younger), not 18.

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27 mins ago, Bass Ackwards said:

I think it's stupid to harass or stop a kid from selling lemonade, but 16 is not a kid, that's an adult. I think the oldest kid I ever saw selling lemonade was about 12. That law should be for kids under the age of 16 (or younger), not 18.

Well, that is a bit of nit picking, but frankly, as  Libertarian, I think if you are 23 or 35 or 43 or 78 you should be able to sell lemonade from your property.

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1 hour ago, Steve in Mass said:

:laugh:

 

Back in the late 60's and early 70's, I lived in a "development" neighborhood in Clifton NJ. A bunch of houses built back in the 40's after the war, nearly all the same design on 50' x 100' foot lots. There were easily 200 houses on the 3 block cul de sac.

 

Among other things I did to make money (mowing lawns, shoveling snow, delivering papers), come Christmas time I would make wreaths and grave blankets, a talent I learned from my Grandfather that did it that time of year on a larger scale (and I would help him for cash as well.)

 

I would display them on our front lawn with a sign saying "For Sale" and most all the neighbors loved it and I did a pretty good business. Over the course of 5 -6 weeks between T'Day and Christmas I could make $200 or more, which back then to a 12 year old kind, I was rolling in gold.

 

One year a cop knocks at our door and said he got a complaint from a neighbor that I was doing this. My Mom agreed to take down the sign, but the display would remain. The cop laughed and knew this all was silly, and later that evening he actually came back and bought 2 wreaths from me....... :)

 

That’s cool, Steve. Love to see innovation and drive in kids

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54 mins ago, Steve in Mass said:

Well, that is a bit of nit picking, but frankly, as  Libertarian, I think if you are 23 or 35 or 43 or 78 you should be able to sell lemonade from your property.

I don't think it's nit picking, I just don't think kids should have the same rules/laws as adults for minor stuff like this. If my neighbors kids sold lemonade or veggies they grew I would have no objection and support them, if their father was selling stuff from his hardware store from his house I would have big objections to the traffic.

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1 hour ago, Bass Ackwards said:

I don't think it's nit picking, I just don't think kids should have the same rules/laws as adults for minor stuff like this. If my neighbors kids sold lemonade or veggies they grew I would have no objection and support them, if their father was selling stuff from his hardware store from his house I would have big objections to the traffic.

Just FYI most state have laws which allow "farms" to sell their produce on site, regardless of the local zoning. However, the definition of "farm" does vary a little.

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WTG Steve, MAGA! If we don't check ourselves, America that is, we can become a people who need to be micromanaged instead of just doing the right thing. Lemonade is good for the soul!

Now the rest of the story...........

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