bantis

Has your Fishfinder Ever Shorted out?

Has your Fishfinder Shorted out?   17 members have voted

  1. 1. Has your Fishfinder ever Shorted out?

    • Yes, and I had the fuse installed
      2
    • Yes, and I had no fuse installed
      1
    • No, I follow instructions and use the fuse
      8
    • No, and I don't use a fuse!
      7

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15 posts in this topic

Another friendly poll to see real world results.  Please share if you ever had a fish finder short out and stop working.

 

Please exclude incidents where your Fish finder was submerged in water.  This poll is in regards to battery fuses in kayaks and the possible protection they provide.

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If a new out of box sonar unit that is under warranty & the manufacturer says to install a fuse, you would be foolish not to do so, unless you have something to prove to yourself or others about fuses not being necessary, or not really caring about your warranty ....

 

The manufacturer will also tell you that they are not responsible for over voltage or over current failures due to not following their installation instructions when you call in for a warranty claim should such happen.....

 

Same thing with new car warranties & not following scheduled maintenance procedures during the warranty period, fail to do it & have a problem, its not their problem. its yours....

 

As rare as a ff blowing a fuse may be, you're on the hook for replacing the unit yourself, id rather replace a 30 cent fuse than a 600.00 sonar unit.......or maybe all the folks tossing this great no fuse wisdom around will be kind enough to cover the cost of the unit for you out of their own  pockets...:wave:

 

 

 

 

 

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I have fuses on every accessory off my battery. Lights, FF, charging outlets for phone/GoPro. No issues in 2 years of being a tech yakker. At the same time I do a lot of wiring for other hobbies and have no issue with electrical work. Can’t see why anyone would consider an inline fuse a failure point unless you have a cheap holder or have no clue how to make a good connection. All soldered, heat shrunk here no wire nuts or quick connects.

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Although mine was only being used for ice fishing, but I use a fuse for the 12v battery.

Mine crapped out due to a problem with the transducer plug failure.

Had it fixed and now it's been fine for the past few years.

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3 hours ago, Africaster said:

Multiple yaks with multiple FFs, one with fuse, others without, no shorts ... so selected both in survey

I made sure to allow multiple selections for admirals of fleets like yourself.

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19 mins ago, bantis said:

I made sure to allow multiple selections for admirals of fleets like yourself.

This calls for another survey ... do you have:

1. 1 kayak

2. 2 kayaks

3. 3 kayaks

4. More than 3 kayaks

 

I’d hazard a guess that the ratio of singles to multiples would be surprising ...

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this must be in light of my post from last night :rav:still havent decided to use a fuse or not. i dont get how the fuse gets installed after the battery but before the lowrance power cable. 

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I've had 2 Lowrance units simply stop working. Did they "short out"? How are you defining it, how do you know if a short was the cause of it's demise? Seems unlikely. Fuses and breakers in general, even in your house, don't protect the devices, they protect the wiring and batteries. Properly working devices never draw more power than they're supposed to, and a fuse won't usually keep it from letting out the magic smoke if they do you, since something has already failed if it's drawing too much current. Unless of course it's something like a VOM meter that you simply exceeded it's current range. Wiring on the other hand can get crimped and shorted, which leads to very hot wires and, if battery powered, a very hot battery. That's the reason to use the fuse. 

 

An occasional part of my business is building battery powered widgets for theater and such. You can bet I build fuses right into the battery packs so I never hear that a rig of mine has melted down from a wire short. And they have managed to short them.  You can't make stuff foolproof, the fools are so damn clever!

 

Use the inline fuse holder and give it a good shot of dielectric grease before installing the fuse,

Edited by gellfex

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9 hours ago, gellfex said:

I've had 2 Lowrance units simply stop working. Did they "short out"? How are you defining it, how do you know if a short was the cause of it's demise? Seems unlikely. Fuses and breakers in general, even in your house, don't protect the devices, they protect the wiring and batteries. Properly working devices never draw more power than they're supposed to, and a fuse won't usually keep it from letting out the magic smoke if they do you, since something has already failed if it's drawing too much current. Unless of course it's something like a VOM meter that you simply exceeded it's current range. Wiring on the other hand can get crimped and shorted, which leads to very hot wires and, if battery powered, a very hot battery. That's the reason to use the fuse. 

 

An occasional part of my business is building battery powered widgets for theater and such. You can bet I build fuses right into the battery packs so I never hear that a rig of mine has melted down from a wire short. And they have managed to short them.  You can't make stuff foolproof, the fools are so damn clever!

 

Use the inline fuse holder and give it a good shot of dielectric grease before installing the fuse,

 

My electrical knowledge is very basic.  Are you suggesting that a fuse in a setup involving a battery and a device is more so to prevent an electrical fire from wires getting too hot than to protect the device itself?

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I always run my battery cables to a fuse panel and and run my devices to the panel. In my mind its easier to secure and "waterproof" the panel and there aren't as many connections.

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The only way to get an over voltage is if your battery basically blows up. maybe from a charger that went bad with bad diodes Your fish finder cant draw enough power  from the battery  to blow itself up either. On a boat its different you have starters and alternators and a power system that's hooked together that can feed back and blow up electronics.

Gellfex is correct . If your going to use a fuse holder make sure its a good one and use grease, the added connection points can cause week points in your electrical system and  a failure  of your fish finder and nav system while at sea 

I also don't recommend splicing an inline fuse in the fishfinder power wire its thin cheep wire.

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I have the fuse housed in with the battery in one of those small orange waterproof boxes from Walmart. Then the trailer hitch power cable connector sticks out of a hole in the box. That way the fuse wiring is protected and so is the battery from getting banged around. 

Edited by drmevo

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