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Seven Great Whites Spotted Today In Cape Cod Bay

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1 hour ago, capequahog said:

Seals do not need to be culled for great whites but for every other fish out there as well as for the pollution from their crap

These are great words of wisdom on the seal population that has been allowed to grow to where it is today and is not turning the corner to make another rookery inside Cape Cod Bay. Some seals have all ready set up on some of the far reaching beach sand . Once they establish the rookery it will not be to long before we see the same type of population in the bay as well and more devastation to the bottom species of fish that inhabit-at these areas..  

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12 hours ago, Aaron Barmmer said:

I will poke em in the eyes with my Lami! 

Aaron believe me when you do actually see a great white in a feeding mode coming at you with his jaws wide open , you will never ever get a chance to poke it in the eye . They have one of the most impressive surges when attacking and there mouth is so wide when open that the chances of even seeing his eyed I would question. . You would be better off sticking the rod in his mouth and hope he closes it before he reaches where you are holding it. Good thought however to being prepared, . They fear nothing , especially if they have tasted seals and other prey . The guys in the small boats with black wet suits on are really in danger. Changing the colors from black to some other one may save a life at some point , which is worth experimenting among the Kiak fleet

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14 hours ago, Clubcarib said:

Went diving off of Plymouth today for work. I saw this post about 20 minutes before jumping in.  That was one of the most unnerving dives I've ever had. 

Where in Plymouth?

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There is a company that has developed a material with a unique pattern that sharks actually turn away from. Though I think I seem to recall that it was less effective with GW sharks.

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Just now, JEFFSOD said:

There is a company that has developed a material with a unique pattern that sharks actually turn away from. Though I think I seem to recall that it was less effective with GW sharks.

if you are thinking of the Australian company with the lion fish pattern it doesn’t really work.  i had an opportunity and asked a leading senior PhD shark expert “is there anything” and he replied “unknown millions have been spent researching shark deterrents (think the government starting heavy in ww2 concerning downed pilots continuing all the way to modern times) and nothing has really come of it”.

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8 mins ago, John O' said:

As part of the closing?

Part of a continuous monitoring program that’s been going on for years. I usually do all my work off the coast of Hampton NH in less sharky waters

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Another distinction without a difference? The marine Mammal protection act, which protects the seals is a law of the United States, legally passes by congress and signed into law by the President. The "protection" of Great White Sharks is a fiat regulation of NOAA/NMFS not a law. So if push comes to shove which do you think might be changed first?

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Been seeing seals in NJ for years now too, there are a lot of them hanging around Sandy Hook.

3 years ago I had one come up in front of me with a Bluefish and start munching on it. It was during a big blitz so I think it was a fish that was just released.

Last year we were coming around the Hook from a Tog trip during really calm conditions and you could see a bunch of "dog heads" sticking up. They'll be over populated by the Hook soon and more will work their way south.

 

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The potential for a new problem in NJ might actually be a good thing for Massachusetts.  

How you ask?

Massachusetts has always been a copy cat state.   Once they see another state having success, they then copy said state.

I hope NJ has a seal and shark problem soon and then fix it!   :poopfan:

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14 hours ago, bob_G said:

If the gubmint even hinted at a seal cull the public outcry would be worldwide. For that reason alone it will never happen. 

Interesting situation. Both species are protected. One, doe-eyed and cute, the other a mean eating machine.

 

Just for the sake of discussion. Lets  say the biologists are right, and the seal colony is 30,000 animals strong. How many would have to be culled to effectively deter the GWs?

Personally I believe the damage has be done. The outer Cape and CCB has already been imprinted on the GWs DNA. These guys are here to stay.

Agreed.  Nothing will ever be done to the seals. Animal rights activists would go crazy with any seal cull. Seals have more rights than humans on the beach. We can’t approach them, disturb them or even make eye contact with them. It will take large numbers of humans being killed by sharks before anything is even thought about being done to control the seal population. Telling people to stay out of the water will be the only solution for now. 

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16 hours ago, BrianBM said:

  As for bathers ... GWs munch on a couple of southern California almost every year. It doesn't seem to discourage them one bit. 

care to back that up with some statistics? I have not read about many CA shark attacks but that may just be because the media doesn't cover it.

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