codfish

Commercial season starts Monday

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1 hour ago, Aaron Barmmer said:

**** commercial fishing.  It’s not all about the amount of fish they kill but there tactics.  You will see hundreds of boats at some bay side beaches at night right on the beach in casting distance from shore.  Just marking fish on there electronics and dropping eels on there heads.  I’ve watched fleets of commercial scum kill whole schools of fish that real anglers like me would have been catching from shore!   

Aaron you have to be kidding . Commercial taking of fish occurs from both the shore and boats. You speak about hundreds of boats fishing a location and how does that compare to the hundreds that are fishing one of the only hot spots left from shore the Cape Cod Canal. Look at all of the hundreds trying to find a spot to park along the canal at night . Granted in both situations it is not clean fishing, but that is what it has been transformed into given the mentality of those who participate in such events. Both are killing the fish by what ever tactic they choose to fish by . In another time the beaches would be loaded with those fishing for bass and many sold the catch in many cases with out proper permits to do so , just like we have some who fish the canal stacking fish of all species to be sold on the open market. You may have commercial scum as you call them, but no more so that the recreational ones you do not mention.

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Gamefish status? yeah that'll make a big difference :laugh:

 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Division of Marine Fisheries 

April 25, 2019 
MarineFisheries Advisory 
NEW STRIPED BASS CONSERVATION REGULATIONS 
The Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries has implemented two new striped bass 
conservation regulations aimed at reducing release mortality: 
 Effective immediately, it is unlawful for any fisherman to gaff or attempt to gaff striped bass 
measuring less than 28 inches total length, and for a commercial fisherman fishing on an 
open commercial striped bass fishing day to gaff striped bass measuring less than 34 inches 
total length. 
 Effective next year (2020), recreational anglers not fishing aboard for-hire vessels will be 
required to use inline circle hooks when fishing for striped bass with whole or cut natural 
baits. This will include fishing with whole or cut natural baits while in possession of striped 
bass as well. This circle hook mandate will not apply to natural baits attached to an artificial 
lure to be trolled, jigged, or casted and retrieved (e.g., tube and worm). Nor will the mandate 
apply to any natural bait affixed to a treble hook and fished using the snag and drop 
technique. A hook is considered to be an in-line circle hook only if it is manufactured so the 
barb of the hook is in-line with the shank and bend of the hook and is turned perpendicularly 
back to the shank to form a circular or oval shape (see image below). 
The most recent striped bass stock assessment found the species was overfished with overfishing 
occurring. In addition, it demonstrated that release mortality from the recreational fishery is the 
single largest source of fishing mortality (48%).
Accordingly, these actions have been taken to 
reduce release mortality in our fisheries. The prohibition on gaffing undersized striped bass (as 
opposed to all striped bass) takes into consideration safety concerns associated with expediently 
removing large striped bass from the water. In-line circle hooks are proven to substantially reduce 
striped bass release mortality compared to other hooks (e.g., j-hooks or offset circle hooks) by 
being far more likely to hook the fish in the lip or the mouth and not the gut or the gills. The circle 
hook mandate is targeted at private recreational anglers because this segment of the fishery is 
primarily hook-and-release and accounts for the vast majority of striped bass catch in 
Massachusetts. We expect the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission will also take action 
this year to implement coastwide conservation measures for 2020 aimed at reducing overall 
fishing mortality. 
 

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2 mins ago, fishracks said:

Gamefish status? yeah that'll make a big difference :laugh:

 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Division of Marine Fisheries 

April 25, 2019 
MarineFisheries Advisory 
NEW STRIPED BASS CONSERVATION REGULATIONS 
The Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries has implemented two new striped bass 
conservation regulations aimed at reducing release mortality: 
 Effective immediately, it is unlawful for any fisherman to gaff or attempt to gaff striped bass 
measuring less than 28 inches total length, and for a commercial fisherman fishing on an 
open commercial striped bass fishing day to gaff striped bass measuring less than 34 inches 
total length. 
 Effective next year (2020), recreational anglers not fishing aboard for-hire vessels will be 
required to use inline circle hooks when fishing for striped bass with whole or cut natural 
baits. This will include fishing with whole or cut natural baits while in possession of striped 
bass as well. This circle hook mandate will not apply to natural baits attached to an artificial 
lure to be trolled, jigged, or casted and retrieved (e.g., tube and worm). Nor will the mandate 
apply to any natural bait affixed to a treble hook and fished using the snag and drop 
technique. A hook is considered to be an in-line circle hook only if it is manufactured so the 
barb of the hook is in-line with the shank and bend of the hook and is turned perpendicularly 
back to the shank to form a circular or oval shape (see image below). 
The most recent striped bass stock assessment found the species was overfished with overfishing 
occurring. In addition, it demonstrated that release mortality from the recreational fishery is the 
single largest source of fishing mortality (48%).
Accordingly, these actions have been taken to 
reduce release mortality in our fisheries. The prohibition on gaffing undersized striped bass (as 
opposed to all striped bass) takes into consideration safety concerns associated with expediently 
removing large striped bass from the water. In-line circle hooks are proven to substantially reduce 
striped bass release mortality compared to other hooks (e.g., j-hooks or offset circle hooks) by 
being far more likely to hook the fish in the lip or the mouth and not the gut or the gills. The circle 
hook mandate is targeted at private recreational anglers because this segment of the fishery is 
primarily hook-and-release and accounts for the vast majority of striped bass catch in 
Massachusetts. We expect the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission will also take action 
this year to implement coastwide conservation measures for 2020 aimed at reducing overall 
fishing mortality. 
 

Sooooo protecting fish from an act 100% fatal (keeping fish) would not be helpful to the species? 

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19 mins ago, Angler #1 said:

Aaron you have to be kidding . Commercial taking of fish occurs from both the shore and boats. You speak about hundreds of boats fishing a location and how does that compare to the hundreds that are fishing one of the only hot spots left from shore the Cape Cod Canal. Look at all of the hundreds trying to find a spot to park along the canal at night . Granted in both situations it is not clean fishing, but that is what it has been transformed into given the mentality of those who participate in such events. Both are killing the fish by what ever tactic they choose to fish by . In another time the beaches would be loaded with those fishing for bass and many sold the catch in many cases with out proper permits to do so , just like we have some who fish the canal stacking fish of all species to be sold on the open market. You may have commercial scum as you call them, but no more so that the recreational ones you do not mention.

I don’t like any of them! Canal non catch and release Rec guys but the commercial boat fleets are the worst! 

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I commercial fish occasionally and it's all in the way fish are handled. Dont blame the fisherman blame the quota department. I fish and handle the fish with respect. I see many gaff and release shorts

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22 mins ago, Angler #1 said:

Aaron you have to be kidding . Commercial taking of fish occurs from both the shore and boats. You speak about hundreds of boats fishing a location and how does that compare to the hundreds that are fishing one of the only hot spots left from shore the Cape Cod Canal. Look at all of the hundreds trying to find a spot to park along the canal at night . Granted in both situations it is not clean fishing, but that is what it has been transformed into given the mentality of those who participate in such events. Both are killing the fish by what ever tactic they choose to fish by . In another time the beaches would be loaded with those fishing for bass and many sold the catch in many cases with out proper permits to do so , just like we have some who fish the canal stacking fish of all species to be sold on the open market. You may have commercial scum as you call them, but no more so that the recreational ones you do not mention.

And this topic is about the start of commercial season!  Go somewhere else and rant about how the canal guys and Rec guys kill more fish! They all suck and that’s  not what is thread is about! 

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Qbout 5000 seals around the Cape.... Each one eats around 50 lbs of fish a day. This adds up to about 1.75 million lbs. of biomass per week removed from the ecosystem.....Provided the 5000 and 50 numbers are reasonable, I think the fishery is in big trouble from seals alone.

Let's see where the commercial numbers land this year and next year.

Just my 02....

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33 mins ago, fishracks said:

It is it's called a quota

There was a "quota" on Halibut and cod too.   How did that work out for the recreational angler.   :banghd:

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And dont even get me started on the BS that is the Massachusetts Recra-Mercial fishery.    Virtually NONE of the participants are true Commercial anglers.   

 

How many have:

Captains credentials 

Commercial boat insurance 

Commercial Safety gear 

The list goes on

 

They just PLAY Commercial to cover fuel costs and beer.  You want a COMMERCIAL  share of the fishery then pony up and be a REAL Commercial angler.    Screwing those of us with real skin in the game so you can play pretend is bull**** and EVERYONE knows it.  

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3 mins ago, Riptide said:

There was a "quota" on Halibut and cod too.   How did that work out for the recreational angler.   :banghd:

There was a time in the not so distant past when cod were readily caught from shore in tbe canal. Year round! We'd catch cod in our canal lobster traps. As stated by Capt Nugent, how did that quota work out?

 

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56 mins ago, Riptide said:

And dont even get me started on the BS that is the Massachusetts Recra-Mercial fishery.    Virtually NONE of the participants are true Commercial anglers.   

 

How many have:

Captains credentials 

Commercial boat insurance 

Commercial Safety gear 

The list goes on

 

They just PLAY Commercial to cover fuel costs and beer.  You want a COMMERCIAL  share of the fishery then pony up and be a REAL Commercial angler.    Screwing those of us with real skin in the game so you can play pretend is bull**** and EVERYONE knows it.  

I really hate this argument of “real commercial fishermen” bull sh*t. I’m not a “real comm fishermen” but I take part in the fishery from shore and I will not shed a single tear for any real commercial fishermen. I got a permit when I was in between jobs and every fish went a long way in helping me not fall behind. That relatively little amount of money from a few fish a week meant more to me at that time than any boat load of bass for a real comm guy.

 

I and many “recramercial” fishermen have skin in the game. Besides money, most of us have loved this fish for our entire lives and want these fish to be here for our children. 

 

If you are going to beat your drum about the destruction of the stocks due to commercial bass guys than you should really stop bringing your sports to any seafood restaurant after a hard day of sticking hooks into stripers faces. As far as I’m concerned, if you are against the harvest of a limited amount of fish (in my case 2) twice a week for 2 months a year by hook and line than you should really be against all commercial fishing for any wild stock. Draggers , Gill nets, dredges, purse seines, etc are all much more harmful than a limited bass fishery. In my opinion, we are all to blame for the current decline. But the biggest factor is the noticeable increase in recreational anglers and mostly c&r ones at that. More fish are being caught and released and there is undoubtedly a certain mortality rate no matter how careful you are.

 

With all that being said, I would sign on to a moratorium today for both comm and rec fishermen. I’d rather act too early than too late. So maybe we can at least agree on something.

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Commercial fish report from today, I splashed my boat in CCB to pull my lobster traps, the ramp was closed until 9 AM then a few spots opened up, I talked to quite a few guys at the dock when I was going and leaving all said the same thing "short fish not one keeper" as far as lobster fishing goes "I suck at it:mad:"

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