Steve in Mass

Commercial Steamer Bed Closures?

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2 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

Here ya go, from Market Basket. $5/lb.....

 

steamers.jpg.13ce9637e556c606a6c32b124c916372.jpg

Typical ugly back water clams. 

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Read this thread earlier, and was just at Stop and Shop in Framingham so as a test asked guy at the counter where the quahogs were from, he said they don’t have any, so asked where the little necks were from and he said “either the US or Canada”. :banghd:

Edited by PlumFishing

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13 hours ago, PlumFishing said:

Read this thread earlier, and was just at Stop and Shop in Framingham so as a test asked guy at the counter where the quahogs were from, he said they don’t have any, so asked where the little necks were from and he said “either the US or Canada”. :banghd:

See what I mean? :laugh:

 

 

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On 7/7/2019 at 6:37 PM, robc22 said:

That's a good rule of thumb.

Iron rich mud like Mt Hope Bay produces very, very dark quahogs. Mt. Hope bay is where all the relay quahogs come from that are used in the various town's propagation programs. They look pretty when they come out of the water. Shiny and jet black and can be tinged with orange and even a slight gold colour. They do tend to dry to an ugly brown colour. They have large meats in them which are somewhat orange in colour. One market refused to by them from me because she thought they were too ugly for her customer's display cases.

You can also have local black quahogs. Anywhere an iron ore deposit is close to the surface is all it takes.

These are relay quahogs.

 

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That red pattern sounds like notata quahogs. Notatas are a cultured clam designed for aquaculture but for all intents and purposes they are a northern quahog. They are just designed to grow faster. They can spawn so you can find their offspring in the wild. The red pattern disappears with age and breeding with wild quahogs.

These are Notata's......Planted by our own Bob.g

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Hopefully I’ll find the black ones or a mix tomorrow at one of the open spots

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Rob - your post mentioned Mt Hope Bay. I am hoping and think it has come back a lot, as I kinda remember some 15+ years ago it was considered a kinda "dead sea" with all the industry in Fall River. Was that true?, and if so, I hope it has come back strong. :)

 

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4 hours ago, Steve in Mass said:

Rob - your post mentioned Mt Hope Bay. I am hoping and think it has come back a lot, as I kinda remember some 15+ years ago it was considered a kinda "dead sea" with all the industry in Fall River. Was that true?, and if so, I hope it has come back strong. :)

 

Well Mt. Hope Bay is loaded with quahogs so yes there shellfish beds are doing great, However, the bay has very poor water quality. 

The state contracts a couple of dredge boats to fish the area. The quahogs are cheaply sold to the various towns who then plant the quahogs in a good water area to flush themselves out.

The area is closed to harvesting.  The quahogs sit for a few months in there new home and clean out. The state then does meat tests and as long as everything is good that area is open to harvest.

It's a great program. 

The thing about MT hope bay quahogs is they tend to have a very distinct look about them. Once you have harvested them a few times you can spot them a mile off in a fishmonger's display case.

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